All figures taken from Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Dynamics , Beer and Johnston, 2004 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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All figures taken from Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Dynamics , Beer and Johnston, 2004

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  1. ENGR 214Chapter 13Kinetics of Particles: Energy & Momentum Methods All figures taken from Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Dynamics, Beer and Johnston, 2004

  2. Work of a Force • Particle displacement: • Work of force corresponding to displacement : Work is a scalar quantity of units [Nm] If and have same direction If and have opposite directions If is perpendicular to

  3. Work is represented by the area under the curve of Ft plotted versus s. Work of a Force Work of a force during a finite displacement: Ft = Tangential component If we use rectangular components:

  4. Work of a Force Work of a constant force in rectilinear motion: Work of the force of gravity: • Work done by weight = product of weight W and vertical displacement Dy • Work done by weight is +ve when Dy < 0, i.e. when body moves down

  5. Magnitude of the force exerted by a spring is proportional to deflection, • Work of the force exerted by spring, • Work of the force exerted by the spring is equal to negative of area under curve of F plotted against x, Work of a Force • Work of the force exerted by spring is positive when x2 < x1, i.e., when the spring is returning to its undeformed position.

  6. Work of a Force Forces that do no work: • Reaction at frictionless pin supporting rotating body • Reaction at frictionless surface when body in contact moves along surface • Reaction at a roller moving along its track • Weight of a body when its center of gravity moves horizontally.

  7. Consider a particle of mass m acted upon by force • Integrating from A1 to A2 , • Units of work and kinetic energy are the same: Particle Kinetic Energy: Principle of Work & Energy work of = change in kinetic energy Principle of Work & Energy

  8. Applications of the Principle of Work and Energy Determine velocity of pendulum bob at A2. Consider work & kinetic energy. Force acts normal to path and does no work: • Velocity found without determining acceleration and integrating. • All quantities are scalars • Forces which do no work are eliminated

  9. As the bob passes through A2 , Applications of the Principle of Work and Energy • Principle of work and energy cannot be applied to directly determine the acceleration of the pendulum bob. • Calculating the tension in the cord requires supplementing the method of work and energy with an application of Newton’s second law. W=mg

  10. rate at which work is done. • Dimensions of power are work/time or force*velocity. Units for power are Power and Efficiency

  11. Sample Problem 13.1 A car weighing 1814.4 kg is driven down a 5o incline at a speed of 96.54 km/h when the brakes are applied causing a constant total braking force of 6672 N. Determine the distance traveled by the car as it comes to a stop. Use the principle of work and energy.

  12. Sample Problem 13.1 v1=96.54 km/h v2=0 N 6672 N mg

  13. Sample Problem 13.2 Two blocks are joined by an inextensible cable as shown. If the system is released from rest, determine the velocity of block A after it has moved 2 m. Assume that the coefficient of friction between block A and the plane is mk = 0.25 and that the pulley is weightless and frictionless. Apply the principle of work and energy.

  14. x Blocks move by equal amounts x READ SOLUTION IN BOOK

  15. Sample Problem 13.3 A spring is used to stop a 60 kg package which is sliding on a horizontal surface. The spring has a constant k = 20 kN/m and is held by cables so that it is initially compressed 120 mm. The package has a velocity of 2.5 m/s in the position shown and the maximum deflection of the spring is 40 mm. Determine (a) the coefficient of kinetic friction between the package and surface and (b) the velocity of the package as it passes again through the position shown.

  16. SOLUTION: • Apply principle of work and energy between initial position and the point at which spring is fully compressed. Sample Problem 13.3

  17. Apply the principle of work and energy for the rebound of the package. Sample Problem 13.3

  18. Sample Problem 13.4 • A 2000 lb car starts from rest at point 1 and moves without friction down the track shown. Determine: • the force exerted by the track on the car at point 2, and • the minimum safe value of the radius of curvature at point 3.

  19. SOLUTION: • Apply principle of work and energy to determine velocity at point 2. • Apply Newton’s second law to find normal force by the track at point 2. Sample Problem 13.4

  20. Apply principle of work and energy to determine velocity at point 3. • Apply Newton’s second law to find minimum radius of curvature at point 3 such that a positive normal force is exerted by the track. Sample Problem 13.4

  21. Sample Problem 13.5 • D has a weight of 600 lb, and C weighs 800 lb. Determine the power delivered by the electric motor M when D: • is moving up at a constant speed of 8 ft/s • has an instantaneous velocity of 8 ft/s and an acceleration of 2.5 ft/s2, both directed upwards.

  22. In the first case, bodies are in uniform motion. Determine force exerted by motor cable from conditions for static equilibrium. Free-body C: Free-body D: Sample Problem 13.5

  23. In the second case, both bodies are accelerating. Apply Newton’s second law to each body to determine the required motor cable force. Free-body C: Free-body D: Sample Problem 13.5

  24. Work of the force of gravity : • Work is independent of path followed; depends only on the initial and final values of Wy. potential energy of the body with respect to force of gravity. • Units of work and potential energy are the same: Potential Energy • Choice of datum from which the elevation y is measured is arbitrary.

  25. Work of the force exerted by a spring depends only on the initial and final deflections of the spring, • The potential energy of the body with respect to the elastic force, Potential Energy • Note that the preceding expression for Ve is valid only if the deflection of the spring is measured from its undeformed position.

  26. Conservative Forces • A force is conservative if its work is independent of the path followed by the particle as it moves from A1 to A2. • Gravity forces and elastic spring forces are conservative. • Friction forces are non-conservative.

  27. Work of a conservative force: • Principle of work and energy: • It follows that: Conservation of Energy • When a particle moves under the action of conservative forces, the total mechanical energy is constant. • Friction forces are not conservative. Total mechanical energy of a system involving friction decreases. • Mechanical energy is dissipated by friction into thermal energy. Total energy is constant.

  28. Conservation of Energy • Particle moving along path. • In the absence of friction, total mechanical energy is constant. • Potential energy depends only on elevation. • Particle speed is the same at any given elevation (A, A', A")

  29. Sample Problem 13.6 A 20 lb collar slides without friction along a vertical rod. The spring attached to the collar has an undeflected length of 4 in. and a constant of 3 lb/in. If the collar is released from rest at position 1, determine its velocity after it has moved 6 in. to position 2.

  30. Position 1: Position 2: Conservation of Energy: Sample Problem 13.6 • SOLUTION: • Apply the principle of conservation of energy between positions 1 and 2.

  31. Sample Problem 13.7 The 0.5 lb pellet is pushed against the spring and released from rest at A. Neglecting friction, determine the smallest deflection of the spring for which the pellet will travel around the loop and remain in contact with the loop at all times. • For pellet to remain in contact, force exerted on pellet must be greater than or equal to zero. • Set force exerted by loop on pellet to zero & solve for the minimum velocity at D. • Apply principle of conservation of energy between A & D.

  32. SOLUTION: • Setting the force exerted by the loop to zero, solve for the minimum velocity at D. • Apply the principle of conservation of energy between points A and D. Sample Problem 13.7

  33. Newton’s second law: linear momentum Principle of Impulse and Momentum • Final momentum = initial momentum + impulse of force during time interval • Units of impulse is [Ns]=[kg m/s]

  34. Principle of Impulse and Momentum Principle of impulse & momentum: Can be resolved into components: When several forces act on a particle: When more than 1 particle is involved, we can either consider each particle separately, or we can add the momentum and impulse for the entire system of particles: Note: forces of action & reaction exerted by the particles on each other have impulses that cancel out. Only the impulses of external forces need to be considered.

  35. Principle of Impulse and Momentum For entire system of particles: If sum of external forces = 0 Total momentum is conserved Boats move in opposite directions

  36. Impulsive Motion Impulsive force: a force that acts on a particle during a very short time interval, but is large enough to cause a significant change in momentum When impulsive forces act on a tennis ball: Non-impulsive forces: forces for which is small, and therefore can be neglected (such as weight)

  37. Sample Problem 13.10 A car weighing 1814.4 kg is driven down a 5° incline at a speed of 96.54 km/h when the brakes are applied causing a constant total breaking force of 6672 N. Determine the time required for the car to come to a stop. Use the principle of impulse and momentum.

  38. Sample Problem 13.10 Principle of impulse and momentum: Taking components parallel to the incline:

  39. Sample Problem 13.11 36.6 m/s 24.4 m/s A 113.4 g baseball is pitched with a velocity of 24.4 m/s. After the ball is hit by the bat, it has a velocity of 36.6 m/s in the direction shown. If the bat and ball are in contact for 0.015 s, determine the average impulsive force exerted on the ball during the impact. Use the principle of impulse and momentum

  40. Sample Problem 13.11 Principle of impulse and momentum: 36.6 m/s x-direction: 24.4 m/s y-direction: 177.9 N 434.5 N 24.2° 396.4 N

  41. Sample Problem 13.12 Principle of impulse and momentum: A 10 kg package drops from a chute into a 24 kg cart with a velocity of 3 m/s. Knowing that the cart is initially at rest and can roll freely, determine (a) the final velocity of the cart, (b) the impulse exerted by the cart on the package, and (c) the fraction of the initial energy lost in the impact. Use the principle of impulse and momentum.

  42. Sample Problem 13.12 Apply the principle of impulse and momentum to the package-cart system: x-direction:

  43. Sample Problem 13.12 Apply the same principle to the package alone to determine the impulse exerted on it from the change in its momentum. x direction: y components:

  44. Sample Problem 13.12 To determine the fraction of energy lost, calculate initial and final energies: Initial energy: Final energy:

  45. Impact • Impact: Collision between two bodies which occurs during a small time interval and during which the bodies exert large forces on each other. • Line of Impact: Common normal to the surfaces in contact during impact. • Central Impact: Impact for which the mass centers of the two bodies lie on the line of impact; otherwise, it is an eccentric impact. • Direct Impact: Impact for which the velocities of the two bodies are directed along the line of impact. • Oblique Impact: Impact for which one or both of the bodies move along a line other than the line of impact.

  46. Direct Central Impact • Bodies moving in the same straight line: • Upon impact the bodies undergo aperiod of deformation, at the end of which, they are in contact and moving at a common velocity. • A period of restitution follows during which the bodies either regain their original shape or remain permanently deformed. • Wish to determine the final velocities of the two bodies. The total momentum of the two body system is preserved, • A second relation between the final velocities is required.

  47. Period of deformation: • Period of restitution: • A similar analysis of particle B yields • Perfectly plastic impact, e = 0: • Perfectly elastic impact, e = 1:Total energy and total momentum conserved. Direct Central Impact • Combining the relations leads to the desired second relation between the final velocities. e depends on materials, impact velocity, shape & size of colliding surfaces.

  48. Coefficient of Restitution In general, e has a value between 0 and 1. The two limiting conditions are: • Elastic impact (e = 1): In a perfectly elastic collision, no energy is lost and the relative separation velocity equals the relative approach velocity of the particles. In practical situations, this condition cannot be achieved. • Plastic impact (e = 0): In a plastic impact, the relative separation velocity is zero. The particles stick together and move with a common velocity after the impact. Some typical values of e are: Steel on steel: 0.5 – 0.8 Wood on wood: 0.4 – 0.6 Lead on lead: 0.12 – 0.18 Glass on glass: 0.93 – 0.95

  49. Coefficient of Restitution The quality of a tennis ball is measured by the height of its bounce. This can be quantified by the coefficient of restitution. If the height from which the ball is dropped and the height of its resulting bounce are known, we can determine the coefficient of restitution. How? During a collision, some of the initial kinetic energy will be lost in the form of heat, sound, or due to localized deformation.

  50. Problems Involving Energy and Momentum • Three methods for the analysis of kinetics problems: • Direct application of Newton’s second law • Method of work and energy • Method of impulse and momentum • Select the method best suited for the problem or part of a problem under consideration.