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CSE111: Great Ideas in Computer Science. Dr. Carl Alphonce 219 Bell Hall Office hours: M-F 11:00-11:50 645-4739 alphonce@buffalo.edu. Announcements. No recitations this week or next. First meeting of recitations in week of 1/25-1/29. Extra copies of syllabus available at front of class.

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cse111 great ideas in computer science

CSE111: Great Ideas in Computer Science

Dr. Carl Alphonce

219 Bell Hall

Office hours: M-F 11:00-11:50

645-4739

alphonce@buffalo.edu

announcements
Announcements
  • No recitations this week or next. First meeting of recitations in week of 1/25-1/29.
  • Extra copies of syllabus available at front of class
today
Today
  • Course introduction
    • Algorithm
    • Incompleteness Theorem
    • Computing Machines
    • Abstraction
algorithm
Algorithm
  • informally: a sequence of steps to perform some task
incompleteness theorem
Incompleteness Theorem
  • Kurt Gödel
  • 1930’s
  • “in any mathematical theory encompassing our traditional arithmetic system, there are statements whose truth or falsity cannot be established by algorithmic means” [p. 4]
computing machines
Computing Machines
  • Abacus – data storage
  • Fixed algorithm machines
    • Pascal (1623-1662)
    • Leibniz (1646-1716)
    • Babbage (1792-1871) (difference engine)
  • General computation machines
    • Babbage (analytical engine)
    • Jacquard (1752-1834)
    • Stibitz (1940)/Mark I (Bell Labs, 1944) - electromechanical
    • Atanasoff-Berry (1941)
    • ENIAC (1946)
abstraction
Abstraction
  • Ignore unimportant details
  • Focus on a given level of granularity
  • Way of handling complexity
representing data
Representing data
  • Next class we will begin discussing how data is represented.
  • We will explain how all data is represented using sequences of just two symbols, ‘0’ and ‘1’.