slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
July 8 , 2014 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
July 8 , 2014

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 50

July 8 , 2014 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 114 Views
  • Uploaded on

Webinar: Explore patterns in space and time with the Visualization Tool. July 8 , 2014. Webinar Team. Phenology. The science of the seasons Blooms and buds Hibernation, migration, emergence Easy to observe.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'July 8 , 2014' - elpida


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Webinar:

Explore patterns in space and time with the Visualization Tool

July 8, 2014

slide3

Phenology

  • The science of the seasons
  • Blooms and buds
  • Hibernation, migration, emergence
  • Easy to observe

…it is the study of the timing of recurring plant and animal life-cycle stages, or phenophases, and their relationship to environmental conditions.

Photo credit: L. Barnett

slide4

USA National Phenology Network

Primary goal

Create a standardized dataset for use in multiple types of research.

Mission

Make phenology data, models and related information available.

Encourage people of all ages and backgrounds to observe and record phenology.

Understand how species and landscapes are responding to climate change.

Photo credit: C. Enquist

slide5

USA National Phenology Network

Nature’s Notebook

for scientists, naturalists, volunteers, land managers, park rangers, and YOU!

Photo credit: L. Romano

Poll

slide6

Observing change over time

I observed an unusual circumstance this spring on the foothill of Moscow Mountain, northern Idaho, elev. 3000‘.I have been monitoring the arrival of hummers for many years here--they range in arrival from early to late April. Usually the Calliope is first, followed by the Rufous. Over the last few years, the Rufous have been either arriving at the same time or before the Calliope. This year the two were nearly simultaneous on Apr. 23. About a week later I spotted the Black Chinned--usually not often seen, and never before late June/July (followed in late summer by the Broadtailed).

slide8

Publications

Models leaf budburst across the eastern U.S. under climate scenarios; by the end of the century, species like red maple will leaf out 17 days earlier.

Develops more precise models for changes in ecosystem function in Alaska, accounting for the phenology of individual species, rather than estimating an average day of year across species.

Cloned plants had a more consistent response to warming spring temperatures than natural populations

slide10

Questions – Map Interface

Where are most sites located?

Where is my site located?

Where are people observing Trillium?

Exploring the green wave, with spring warming in 2014

slide11

Questions – Map Interface

Where are most sites located?

Where is my site located?

slide12

Questions – Map Interface

3. Where are people observing Trillium?

Photo credit: Paul Donahue

slide13

Questions – Map Interface

4. Exploring the green wave, with spring warming in 2014

slide14

Questions – Graph Interface

  • Comparing across scales: How does red maple phenology compare across: individual tree, site, state and region?
  • Management: When do Siberian elm (invasive) and Cottonwood (native) fruit?
  • Species Interactions:
    • Monarch and milkweed
    • White-winged doves and Saguaros
slide15

Questions – Graph Interface

Comparing across scales: How does red maple phenology compare across: individual tree, site, state and region?

slide16

Questions – Graph Interface

2. Management: When do Siberian elm (invasive) and Cottonwood (native) fruit?

Photo credit: Erin Posthumus

slide17

Questions – Graph Interface

3. Species Interactions: Monarch and milkweed

Photo credit: Marty Nevils Davis

slide18

Don’t get tripped up!

  • Lots of sites with no data
    • Check plant and animal leaderboards, to see which species have a good amount of data
    • On the tool, filter by species first
  • Species box – filters just limit species list, you can’t limit data by partner (yet)
  • Long loading time, especially with climate data
slide19

Other tricks

Multiple site selection is key for looking at regional patterns

Plot data, and then change location in the graph tool to compare regions or years

Use direct URL to share your findings: http://www.usanpn.org/files/viz/index.html

slide20

What places, species or phenophases would you like to explore?

Poll – more mapping or graphing?

slide21

What is this tool good for?

  • Seeing which species and locations are data-rich
  • Finding potential patterns
    • for example, relationships between climate and phenology
  • Answering straightforward questions
    • for example, did my poppies flower earlier or later this year than last year?
slide22

What is this tool NOT good for?

  • Conclusively showing a relationship between two species
    • Negative data is not completely taken into account (yeses override no’s in the graph if both are present for day/site/species)
    • Animals are more likely to be seen if people spent longer looking for them, this is not accounted for in the tool
    • Statistical tests (comparison of means, correlations) not available
  • Conclusively showing a relationship between climate variables and phenology
slide23

Resources

Videos: http://www.usanpn.org/nn/connect/visualizations

Tutorial: https://www.usanpn.org/data/viz-tutorial

Training slides: https://www.usanpn.org/files/shared/files/VizToolTraining.pdf

slide24

Mark your calendars…

  • Upcoming webinars:
  • Tuesday, September 2, 2014:Special for Local Phenology Leaders: Partner showcase: Learn how other groups are using Nature's Notebook
  • Tuesday, September 23, 2014 Gaining 100% confidence in intensity estimates

www.usanpn.org/nn/connect/Webinars2014

slide25

You’re invited to

connect with USA-NPN…

Join the phenology community of practice, for research, education or management.

Use NPN protocols, tools or data to advance your mission.

Sign up for our quarterly newsletter.

Alyssa Rosemartin

alyssa@usanpn.org

Thank you!

slide26

Questions – Graph Interface

  • White-winged doves and Saguaros
slide27

Questions – Graph Interface

  • Acorns on Valley Oaks