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Sentence Unit. SUBJECT AND PREDICATE. Love stinks Do these two words make a sentence?. Subject/Predicate. A grammatical sentence contains a subject (who or what the sentence is about) and a predicate (what the subject is or does) and expresses a complete thought.

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slide3

Love stinks

Do these two words make a sentence?

subject predicate
Subject/Predicate
  • A grammatical sentence contains a subject (who or what the sentence is about) and a predicate (what the subject is or does) and expresses a complete thought.
  • “Love” is the subject of the sentence and “stinks” is the predicate.
    • These words have multiple meanings and can act as different parts of speech than they’re being used as here. It depends on their purpose. Here, though, love is a noun and stinks is a verb.
subject predicate1
Subject/Predicate
  • A sentence’s subject usually contains a noun and a sentence’s predicate always contains a verb.
  • New York Times Article
    • On your own paper please write a list of any nouns you find interesting or challenging and any verbs you find interesting or challenging (two lists).
    • T-Chart
subject predicate2
Subject/Predicate
  • Let’s discuss the article:
    • Do you believe that chess saved Shawn Martinez’s life? Why?
    • How could both perspectives from #1 be supported by quotes from the article? (specific quotes)
    • Do you think Shawn Martinez would say that chess saved his life? Why?
subject predicate3
Subject/Predicate
  • Groups (I’ll number you off)
  • In your groups you will show all of your lists and choose 2 nouns and 2 verbs.
  • Please write your 2 nouns and 2 verbs on the whiteboard (once a word is used it cannot be repeated).
  • Word Wall on board
subject predicate4
Subject/Predicate
  • Each group will now mix and match all of the words on the word wall to create 5 original sentences.
  • You will use the nouns as the subjects and the verbs as the predicates.
  • Add words and change tense in order to create challenging sentences.
  • Underline the subject with an “s” underneath, underline predicate with a “p” underneath!
  • Present your sentences on board.
subject predicate video
Subject/Predicate video!!!
  • ‪    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fdUXxdmhIsw‬
notes
Notes
  • Subject: Who or what the sentence is about.
    • TIP: To find the subject, ask whois doing something or about whom or what something is being said.
      • What is the subject in the following sentence?
        • The Grand Canyon is a well-known American landmark.
notes1
Notes
  • Predicate: tells something about what the subject is or does.
    • What is the predicate in the following sentence?
      • Dorothy ran home.
simple complete subject
Simple/Complete Subject
  • Simple Subject: the main word or word group that tells whom or what the sentence is about.
    • The simple subject is PART of the COMPLETE SUBJECT.
  • Complete Subject: all words that tell whom or what the sentence is about.
  • EXAMPLE: The Kabuki dancers’ costumes are beautiful.
    • Complete Subject: The Kabuki dancers’ costumes
    • Simple Subject: costumes
simple complete predicate
Simple/complete predicate
  • Simple Predicate (or the main verb): the main word or word group that tells what the subject is or does.
  • Complete Predicate: the main verb and all the words that describe that verb and complete its meaning.
  • EXAMPLE: The party for my grandparents’ fiftieth anniversary ended with a grand display of fireworks.
    • Complete Predicate: ended with a grand display of fireworks
    • Simple Predicate: ended
group practice
Group Practice
  • What is the SS, CS, SP, CP in the following sentences?
  • Justin washed Dad's car.
  • The garbage truck arrives very early in the morning.
  • Would they prefer chili or sauerkraut with their hotdogs?
  • Sixteen inches of snow fell in the Adirondacks last night.
  • I love to climb.
  • Reading often improves your vocabulary
workbook practice
Workbook Practice
  • Please complete the following practice in your workbooks:
    • Pages:
      • 5-7
      • Depending on our time, what you don’t finish will be HW.
subject predicate pop quiz
Subject/Predicate Pop Quiz
  • What is the SS, CS, SP, CP in the following sentences?
  • Justin washed Dad's car.
  • The garbage truck arrives very early in the morning.
  • Would they prefer chili or sauerkraut with their hotdogs?
  • Sixteen inches of snow fell in the Adirondacks last night.
  • I love to climb.
  • Reading improves your vocabulary
compound subjects
Compound Subjects
  • Many times a sentence may have more than one subject or more than one predicate (verb) or both!
  • A compound subject is when two or more connected subjects have the same verb.
  • Example: The doorbell and the telephone rang at the same time.
  • Can you tell what the two subjects are?
  • What verb do they share?
compound predicate verb
Compound Predicate (Verb)
  • A compound predicate or verb is when two or more verbs have the same subject.
  • Example: The Tigers won the first game of the double-header but did not win the second.
  • What are my verbs in this sentence?
  • What subject do they share?
practice
PRACTICE
  • Workbook pages 11-13
  • HW if not completed
slide24

TREASURE HUNT

    • Placing the answers on your own paper, search in your workbook and find the definitions for the following topics (hint: the definitions are usually in red at the top of a page).
    • Sentence Fragment
    • Clauses
    • Independent Clause
    • Dependent (or Subordinate) Clause
what is a sentence
What is a Sentence??
  • BOTH DEFINITIONS ARE CORRECT, CHOOSE THE ONE YOU CONNECT WITH THE BEST:
  • Definition 1: A sentence is a group of words arranged to express a complete thought.  The arrangement of the words follows the rules of English grammar.
  • Definition 2: A sentence is a group of words that begins with a capital letter, has a subject and a complete verb (predicate), and ends with a period.
sentence fragments
Sentence Fragments
  • A word group that looks like a sentence but does not contain both a subject and a verb or does not express a complete thought.
  • THEY ARE DECEITFUL LITTLE MONSTERS
reasons for fragments
Reasons for Fragments
  • No main verb
    • Fragment: A story with deep thoughts and emotions. Possible Revision:
    • She told a story with deep thoughts and emotions.
  • No Subject
    • Fragment: Planted flowers in late summer.Possible Revision:
    • Farmer Hoggett planted flowers in late summer.
  • No Complete Thought
  • Fragment: because they had never snowboarded before.
    • This one has a subject and a verb, but isn’t a complete thought.
    • Possible Revision:
    • They were afraid because they had never snowboarded before.
fragment slip chaos convo activity
Fragment Slip Chaos Convo Activity
  • I am going to give each student a slip of paper. These slips have sentence fragments written on them. You are going to go up to a random person and read your sentence fragment like this:
    • “Before she hated giraffes, blank”

Or

    • “Blank, when pigs fly!”
  • Your partner will have to take that fragment and turn it into a complete sentence by doing two things: telling you where the comma should be added (if there needs to be one) AND finishing the sentence to make it complete.
  • DEMONSTRATION
practice1
Practice
  • Workbook pages 2-4
clauses
CLAUSES:
  • Independent Clause (Main Clause): expresses a complete thought and can stand by itself as a complete sentence (It has both a subject and a verb).
  • Examples:
    • The runner jumped.
    • The singer bowed.
    • The baby cried.
simple sentences
SIMPLE SENTENCES
  • Definition: Contains one independent clause and no dependent (subordinate) clauses.
  • Examples:
  • The runner jumped.
  • The singer bowed.
  • The baby cried.
  • Interesting Examples:
  • The girl ran into the kitchen.
    • This simple sentence has one independent clause which contains one subject, girl, and one predicate, ran into the kitchen. This example is distinct from the previous three in that its verb phrase consists of more than one word.
  • The dog barked and howled at the cat.
    • This simple sentence has one independent clause which contains one subject, dog, and one complete predicate, barked and howled at the cat. This predicate has two verbs, known as a compound predicate: barked and howled. This compound verb should not be confused with a compound sentence.
rules
Rules
  • Rule 1: Simple sentences can be short.
    • Jon laughed.
  • Rule 2: Simple sentences can be longer.
    • The funny, curly-headed boy laughed extremely hard.
  • Rule 3: Simple sentences can have a compound subject.
    • Simon and Garfunkel made one record that year.
  • Rule 4: Simple sentences can have a compound predicate.
    • Marianne sang, danced, and played at the recital.
  • Rule 5: Simple sentences can have both a compound subject and a compound predicate
    • Bill and John run and laugh everyday.
group activity for simple sentences
Group Activity for Simple Sentences
  • I will count you off into groups of 4-5.
  • Each group will receive a slip of paper with a topic on it.
  • You will take that topic and write a funny story using only simple sentences, one after the other.
  • You will do this by PASSING THE PAPER AROUND A CIRCLE and each group member adding a new simple sentence.
  • Go around the circle 3 times.
  • Share
practice2
Practice
  • Workbook pages: 120,139
compound sentences
Compound Sentences
  • A compound sentence is two or more simple sentences (independent clauses) that are joined together by one of these:
    • a conjunction and a comma
    • a semicolon
    • a semicolon, conj. adverb, and a comma.
  • THERE ARE NO DEPENDENT CLAUSES HERE!
3 ways to join ind clauses
3 ways to Join Ind. clauses
  • Comma, conjunction
  • Semicolon
  • Semicolon, conj. adverb, comma
  • Conjunctionsare: and, but, or, nor, so, for, yet.
  • For a compound sentence to be punctuated correctly with a comma, it must come before the conjunction.
  • Example:
    • Comma: Liz ran home, but first she stopped by Anna’s.
    • Semicolon: The kids ran in circles; they are hoping to make their parents proud.
    • Semicolon, conj. Adverb, comma: I remained dry; however, Sally was soaked.
comma splices
Comma Splices
  • A comma splice is the incorrect use of a comma between two independent clauses.
  • EXAMPLE: I like this class, it is very interesting.
    • How is that not correct!?
  • You can usually fix the error by:
    • Changing the comma to a period and therefore making the two clauses into two separate sentences
    • By changing the comma to a semicolon
    • By making one clause dependent by inserting a dependent marker word in front of it (such as also, however, therefore, etc…)
  • AVOIDING COMMA SPLICES: Make sure you have a conjunction after your comma, before your next independent clause!
compound sentence activity
COMPOUND SENTENCE ACTIVITY
  • Groups
  • Choose an APPROPRIATE picture from a magazine or newspaper to write a simple sentence about.
  • Cut out the picture and glue it on your printer paper.
  • Write the sentence directly underneath the picture.
  • Find a second picture to write a simple sentence about.
  • Cut that picture out and glue it on the printer paper as well.
  • Write the sentence directly underneath the picture.
  • NOW find a way to join the two simple sentences (independent clauses) into one larger sentence and write it LARGE at the bottom of the page! THIS IS A COMPOUND SENTENCE!!!
practice3
Practice
  • Workbook pg. 140-141
slide43

Dependent (or Subordinate) Clause: does not express a complete thought and cannot stand by itself as a complete sentence.

    • Remember our sentence fragment game?!
    • Examples:
    • As he prepared their meal
      • Make into a complex sentence by adding a simple sentence somewhere (Ind. Clause)
    • Before there were dinosaurs
      • Make into a complex sentence by adding a simple sentence somewhere (Ind. Clause)
complex sentences
Complex Sentences
  • Contains one independent clause and at least one dependent clause.
    • Examples: At the park, Jennifer fed the ducks and swans, which quickly swam toward her.
      • Where’s the Ind. clause? Dep. clause?
    • As she watched the fish and snails, she thought about a career in marine biology.
      • Where’s the Ind. clause? Dep. clause?
compound complex sentences
Compound-Complex Sentences
  • Contains two or more independent clauses and at least one dependent clause.
  • Example:
    • Although both were tired, Jerry went to his soccer practice, and Carl went to his piano lesson.
      • Where are the two or more independent clauses?
      • Where is the one dependent clause?
    • You should shut the gate whenever you leave the backyard; otherwise, the dogs may get out.
      • Where are the two or more independent clauses?
      • Where is the one dependent clause?
practice4
Practice!
  • On the following slide there are 5 pictures. I want you to write a complex sentence for 1 and 2.
  • Write compound-complex sentences for 3-4.
  • In your sentences describe the picture or set the scene with a story.
pair and share
Pair and Share
  • Turn to a neighbor and trade papers. Look over each others 5 sentences.
  • Did they do the activity correctly?
  • Write tips and pointers on their paper if they confused the sentence types.
  • Discuss how to write compound-complex sentences correctly.
practice5
Practice!
  • Workbook practice:
    • Pages 142-145