a picture of health highlights from the 2008 british columbia adolescent health survey northwest n.
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McCreary Centre Society mcs.bc

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McCreary Centre Society mcs.bc

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  1. A Picture of Health: Highlights from the 2008 British Columbia Adolescent Health SurveyNorthwest McCreary Centre Society www.mcs.bc.ca

  2. Survey Administration • Administration took place in Grade 7-12 classes in 50 of the 59 BC School Districts. • Over 29 000 surveys were collected in 1,760 classrooms between February and June 2008. • Northwest “I am happy to see a survey like this one. It’s about time questions were being asked. Now I am hoping to see some positive actions.” BC Youth Participant

  3. Provincial Key Findings A Picture of Health www.mcs.bc.ca

  4. Provincial Key Findings • Most students are doing well; nearly all 84% report good or excellent health • Serious injuries have declined • 18% of females, 7% of males did not get mental health services they needed • At least half of youth did not eat the recommended servings of fruits or vegetables yesterday

  5. Provincial Key Findings • No change in physical activity: only 1 in 4 males, 1 in 10 females exercise every day • Suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts are lower for the first time since 1992 • More than 1 in 5 females, 1 in 10 males reported deliberate self-harm

  6. Provincial Key Findings • Far fewer youth smoke than a decade ago, and those who do started at older ages • Alcohol and marijuana use lower • Fewer students had ever used cocaine, amphetamines, or mushrooms, continuing declines since 1998 • But use of some other drugs, including hallucinogens like LSD, rose

  7. Provincial Key Findings • Relationship violence is unchanged since 2003; 9% of males, 6% of females • Pregnancy rates also stable, less than 2% • Reversing trends in physical and sexual abuse, after declines since 1992 • Protective factors can help even the most vulnerable youth overcome risks

  8. Provincial Key Findings Most BC teens are doing well, and report healthier behaviours than students 10 years ago

  9. Home and Family Northwest – A Picture of Health www.mcs.bc.ca

  10. Home and Family

  11. Home and Family

  12. Physical Health Northwest – A Picture of Health www.mcs.bc.ca

  13. Health status • 84% reported good or excellent health, consistent with results for 2003 • 12% of youth reported a debilitating health condition or disability.

  14. Access to Medical Care • 16% of youth did not get medical help when they felt they needed it.

  15. Injuries • 38% of students were injured seriously enough in the past year to need medical attention.

  16. Injuries Injury Prevention • 64% of youth always wore a seatbelt. • 19% of students always wore a helmet while bike riding.

  17. Nutrition • At least 51% of youth fell short of the recommended daily portions of fruits and vegetables

  18. Weight and Body Image

  19. Weight and Body Image • Similar to 2003 local rates and the 2008 provincial rate, 17% of males were very satisfied with their body image, compared to only 10% of females

  20. Weight and Body Image

  21. Mental and Emotional Health Northwest – A Picture of Health www.mcs.bc.ca

  22. Mental and Emotional Health

  23. Mental and Emotional Health

  24. Mental and Emotional Health

  25. Mental and Emotional Health

  26. Mental and Emotional Health

  27. Mental and Emotional Health Risk Factors for Suicide Attempts: • Family or friend suicide attempts (19% vs. 4%) • Sexual abuse (30% vs. 4%) • Physical abuse (22% vs. 4%) • Aboriginal ethnicity (14% vs. 5%) • Health condition or disability (22% vs. 5%)

  28. Sexual Behaviour Northwest – A Picture of Health www.mcs.bc.ca

  29. Sexual Behaviour • 70% of youth never had sexual intercourse • Most common reasons for not having sex: • Waiting to meet the right person (53%) • Not ready for sex (47%) • Not wanting to get or cause a pregnancy (41%) • Among those who had sex: • Most commonly started at age 15 • 21% first had sex before age 14

  30. Sexual Behaviour: Oral Sex

  31. Sexual Behaviour: Birth Control Birth control method used last time youth had sex: • Condoms: 66% • Birth control pills: 43% • Only withdrawal: 5% • Emergency contraception: 6% 7% of sexually active students have been pregnant or caused a pregnancy

  32. Smoking Northwest – A Picture of Health www.mcs.bc.ca

  33. Smoking

  34. Substance Use Northwest – A Picture of Health www.mcs.bc.ca

  35. Substance Use † Indicates that the difference between North West and provincial estimates was statistically significant.

  36. Substance Use † Indicates that the difference between North West and provincial estimates was statistically significant.

  37. Substance Use † Difference between 2008 Northwest and provincial estimates was statistically significant ◆ Difference between 2003 and 2008 Northwest estimates was statistically significant.

  38. Abuse and Violence Northwest – A Picture of Health www.mcs.bc.ca

  39. Abuse and Violence

  40. Internet Safety: • 14% of students had been in contact with someone on the Internet who made them feel unsafe. • 17% of students were cyber-bullied • Relationship Violence: • 9% of students reported that their boyfriend or girlfriend hit, slapped or hurt them in the past year. • Discrimination: • 19% of students experienced discrimination as a result of their physical appearance. • 14% of students had been discriminated against because of race or skin colour • 6% of students reported they had experienced discrimination because of their sexual orientation.

  41. School and Work Northwest – A Picture of Health www.mcs.bc.ca

  42. School and Work • 66% of students liked school “somewhat” • Females more likely than males to like school “very much” (22% vs. 13%) • School connectedness unrelated to grade level

  43. School and Work

  44. Sport and Leisure Northwest – A Picture of Health www.mcs.bc.ca

  45. Sport and Leisure

  46. Sport and Leisure

  47. Sport and Leisure

  48. Protective Factors Northwest – A Picture of Health www.mcs.bc.ca

  49. Protective Factors • Having protective factors in their lives can promote health and reduce the negative effect of some risk behaviours. • Protective factors in AHS • School (e.g., school connectedness) • Family (e.g., family connectedness) • Community • Connected to culture/ethnic group • Youth engagement in activities • Peer prosocial attitudes about risky behaviours • Friends would disapprove of teen getting pregnant, getting drunk, beating someone up, etc.

  50. Protective Factors: Family and School Connectedness