State s rights and the national bank
Download
1 / 31

- PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 97 Views
  • Uploaded on

State’s Rights and the National Bank. Balancing Nationalism and Sectionalism Part 6.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about '' - elda


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
State s rights and the national bank

State’s Rights and the National Bank

Balancing Nationalism and Sectionalism

Part 6


State s rights and the national bank

When the War of 1812 ended, British manufacturers wanted to destroy their American competitors by flooding the U.S. market with inexpensive goods. In response, Congress in 1816 passed a tariff to protect the infant American industries. The tariff was increased in 1824 and again in 1828. Jackson’s vice president was John C. Calhoun of South Carolina. The two men opposed each other over the Tariff.


State s rights and the national bank


State s rights and the national bank

Although goods. By 1828, the tariff had been raised twice.Calhoun supported the tariff at first, he came to oppose it. He called the Tariff of 1828 a Tariff of Abominations, because he believed that it hurt the South.


State s rights and the national bank


State s rights and the national bank

  • Calhoun that they were paying more for goods in order to support industry in the North.believed the South had the right to disobey the tariff based on the principle of nullification. This principle held that states could nullify federal laws that they felt were unconstitutional.


State s rights and the national bank

  • Calhoun went even further. He that they were paying more for goods in order to support industry in the North.believed that if the government forbid a state from nullifying a federal law, that state had the right to leave the union.


State s rights and the national bank



State s rights and the national bank


State s rights and the national bank

  • South Carolina nullification.declared the new tariff invalid.

  • The state threatened to secede, or leave the Union.


State s rights and the national bank

This made President nullification.Jackson furious. He threatened to send federal troops to collect the tariff revenues.




State s rights and the national bank


State s rights and the national bank

  • Jackson viewed stirred Andrew Jackson’s anger. The President also took on the second national bank, the the bank as an agent of the wealthy and elite – a group he deeply distrusted.


State s rights and the national bank

  • Jackson stirred Andrew Jackson’s anger. The President also took on the second national bank, the tried to shut the bank down by taking money out of it and putting it in other banks. In an attempt to save the bank, the bank’s president called for all loans to be repaid.


State s rights and the national bank


State s rights and the national bank


State s rights and the national bank

  • In 1835, Jackson’s bank war nearly cost him his life. Richard Lawrence, who thought that he was King Richard III of England, believed the United States owed him a large sum of money. He felt Jackson’s actions against the bank were preventing him from receiving him the money he was owed.


State s rights and the national bank

  • Lawrence thought that if he killed Jackson, Martin van Buren (Jackson’s Vice President) would allow for the bank to be reestablished, enabling him to get his money back. Unfortunately for Lawrence, his gun did not fire. He pulled out a second pistol but that one misfired. Jackson tried to beat him to death with his cane.


State s rights and the national bank

  • A new political party, the (Jackson’s Vice President) would allow for the bank to be reestablished, enabling him to get his money back. Unfortunately for Lawrence, his gun did not fire. He pulled out a second pistol but that one misfired. Jackson tried to beat him to death with his cane. Whig Party, emerged in an effort to limit the power of the presidency.


State s rights and the national bank

  • Jackson’s vice president (Jackson’s Vice President) would allow for the bank to be reestablished, enabling him to get his money back. Unfortunately for Lawrence, his gun did not fire. He pulled out a second pistol but that one misfired. Jackson tried to beat him to death with his cane. , Martin Van Buren, won the election of 1836. He became the 8th president of the United States. He inherited another Jackson legacy: a financial mess brought on by the bank fight.


State s rights and the national bank

  • By 1837, (Jackson’s Vice President) would allow for the bank to be reestablished, enabling him to get his money back. Unfortunately for Lawrence, his gun did not fire. He pulled out a second pistol but that one misfired. Jackson tried to beat him to death with his cane. many of the banks Jackson had put money in during the bank fight had failed. This helped cause the Panic of 1837.


State s rights and the national bank


State s rights and the national bank



State s rights and the national bank

  • His vice president, after taking officeJohn Tyler, became 10th president. Tyler did not agree with many of the Whig policies. As a result, the party was unable to enact many of its programs.