Download
personally controlled health records and the app store for health n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Personally Controlled Health Records and the App Store for Health PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Personally Controlled Health Records and the App Store for Health

Personally Controlled Health Records and the App Store for Health

124 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Personally Controlled Health Records and the App Store for Health

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Personally Controlled Health Records and the App Store for Health Kenneth D. Mandl, MD, MPH Director, Intelligent Health Laboratory Children’s Hospital Informatics Program Harvard Medical School Center for Biomedical Informatics

  2. $2.5 Trillion • 17% GDP • Low return on investment • 24th Life expectancy at birth • 29th Infant mortality • 37th System performance • 1/3 spent on activities that do not improve patient outcomes • Inconsistent use of effective interventions

  3. US Spending per capita vs. Life Expectancy

  4. Biased Evidence—two examples • Publication bias • Negative studies aren’t published • Industry funded trials • Are less likely published within 2 years of completion • Are more likely to publish reported favorable outcomes Annals of Internal Medicine 2010

  5. As per the National Coordinator . . . • New England Journal of Med 2008: Low uptake of HIT in ambulatory setting • New England Journal of Med 2009 Low uptake in of HIT in hospitals Conclusion: $48B investment, pushing the technology

  6. Medicare Meaningful Use Incentive Payment Schedule Cap applies for any eligible professional with at least $24,000 in Medicare Part B allowable charges in each payment year

  7. The Goal: A Learning Health System

  8. But investment is in current stage technologies:No data in or out, no communication, terrible UIs

  9. March 1, 2009 “There’s no way small practices can effectively implement electronic health records on their own.” “This is not the iPhone.”

  10. Later in March

  11. $15M ONC-FUNDED RESEARCH PROJECT

  12. Clinical use case 1 Med-tastic is a well-funded NewCo which has developed an elegant medication list application that has physician and consumer facing functionality To work, Med-tastic needs • Prescribing history • Dispensed medication history • Allergies • Problem list diagnoses

  13. Use case 2

  14. Domestic Abuse British Medical Journal 2009

  15. Use case 2 (cont) • The application would require • Comprehensive diagnostic data from primary site of care for each patient (to work well) • Comprehensive diagnostic data from all sites of care (to work very well)

  16. MedTastic may be able to develop apps adapted to several APIs (Cerner’s Mpages etc) • Academic group cannot. • THEREFORE, focus is on an API that enables a single apps store for • Cerner Install • Hospital with homegrown system • Physician practice • Open source EMR

  17. We imagine EMRs as an iPhone-like platform where Medtastic could create and widely distribute an app across many disparate EMRs

  18. EHR as an “iPhone-like” Platform • There is a common application programming interface that enables • Software developers to build SUSTITUTABLE applications • Push innovation to the edges • Nimbly evolve functionality • Avoid vendor lock • Shrink switching costs • Enable disruption

  19. Our vocabulary: • Data Sources (managed by containers) • Containers (present data from data sources to apps in a uniform fashion) • Apps (completely substitutable)

  20. Substitutabilityworks both ways—the containers can also be swapped out

  21. Governance • code: open-source, open formats,led by SMArt team • app store: one app exchange to start, but others can be built. Installations manage their app gallery. Users manage their dashboards. • brand: compliance test to ensure that “SMArt” is meaningful

  22. “App Store” • The SMArt App Exchange will feature appsapproved by the SMArt committee • Other organizations can operateand vouch for alternate app exchanges • Each SMArt containerinstallationwill decide which apps it wants to featurein its App Gallery • Each user may select his preferred apps placed in his App Dashboard

  23. It is not the wild west

  24. SMArtPlatforms.org • SMArt Health App $5,000 Challenge • Announced by Aneesh Chopra during keynote with Bill Gates at mHealth last week • Opens in March and allows innovation in MODULAR functionality • Imposes discipline on us to create version 1.0 of the API • Judges: • Regina Herzlinger (Harvard Business School) • David Kibbe (AFP) • Doug Solomon (IDEO) • Edward Tufte (Yale) • Jim Walker (Geisenger)

  25. Ecosystem NEJM 2008

  26. “We cannot overstate how important PHRs are to the efficient functioning of a low-cost, high quality health-care system . . . . We think that the INDIVO system, or something like it is a good place to start.” --Clayton Christensen Harvard Business School 2009

  27. Will disruptive innovation be or fostered in healthcare

  28. Looping in the Patient

  29. H1 H2 H3 In 1994 we observed that institutions rarely share data x x • Proprietary • Perceived competition • Privacy • Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act • No dedicated resources to do so

  30. H1 H2 H3 What if we gave patients a tool to request their records electronically? x x Indivo Server

  31. H1 H2 H3 And create a personal health record x x Comprehensive record Indivo Server

  32. H1 H2 H3 The collection of these records is a population health database x x Indivo Server Indivo Records

  33. Our original statement on personal control • A PCHR stored all of an individual’s medical history in a container with: • patient control • interoperability • open standards • rules to protect patients

  34. Patient role • Patients can • access the record • grant access to others • specific to their role • of selected portions of the record • store their record in a location of their choice • annotate in the record (but not delete) • grant access to “apps” and to devices

  35. Ecosystem NEJM 2008

  36. “We cannot overstate how important PHRs are to the efficient functioning of a low-cost, high quality health-care system . . . . We think that the INDIVO system, or something like it is a good place to start.” --Clayton Christensen Harvard Business School 2009

  37. Tectonic shifts: PCHR vendors and users create large accessible populations for public health study and intervention New England Journal of Medicine 2008

  38. Individual contributions are accurate JAMIA 2007

  39. JAMIA 2007

  40. Patient vs. Doc Reports Basch The Missing Voice of Patients in Drug-Safety Reporting NEJM 2010

  41. Individual contributions to drug safety data • Patient reported outcomes • Adverse effects • Efficacy endpoints • Adherence • Satisfaction • Quality of life • Patient reported data • Over the counter meds • Complimentary/alternative meds

  42. THE GENOMICS APP

  43. “What ever will we think about now that the genome project is complete?”

  44. Genes • Environment • Microbiome • Phenotype • Healthcare • NEED LARGE N • NEED data capture at home and in clinics