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CATALOGING OF ELECTRONIC RESOURCES. Juan C. Buenrostro Jr. Ed.D. Introduction. Chapter 9 of AACR2R (2002 Revision) covers the rules for description of electronic resources.

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cataloging of electronic resources

CATALOGING OFELECTRONIC RESOURCES

Juan C. Buenrostro Jr. Ed.D.

introduction
Introduction

Chapter 9 of AACR2R (2002 Revision)

covers the rules for description of electronic resources.

Electronic resources consist of data (information representing numbers, text, graphics, images, maps, moving images, sounds, etc.) programs (instructions, etc., that process the data use), or combinations of data and programs.

direct access remote access
Direct Access & Remote Access
  • Direct access is understood to mean that a physical carrier can be described. Such a carrier (e.g., disc/disk, cassette, cartridge) must be inserted into a computerized device or into a peripheral attached to a computerized device.
  • Remote access is understood to mean that no physical carrier can be handled. Remote access can only be provided by use of an input-output device (e.g. terminal), either connected to a computer system (e.g., a resource in a network), or by use of resources stored in a hard disk or other storage device.
chief source of information1
CHIEF SOURCE OF INFORMATION

The chief source of information for electronic resources is the resource itself.

If the information required is

not available from the resource itself,

take it from the following sources

(in this order of preference):

1.printed or online documentation or other accompanying material (e.g. publisher’s letters, “about” file, publisher’s web page about an electronic resource)

2. information printed on a container issued by the publisher, distributor, etc.

1 title and statement of responsibility area
1. TITLE AND STATEMENT OF RESPONSIBILITY AREA

• Transcribe the title proper exactly as to working, order and spelling.

• Precede each parallel title by an equal sign

Ex. El asistente del instructor [electronic resource] = Teaching assistant.

• Precede each unit of other title information by a colon.Ex. Vufile [electronic source] : an information retrieval system for use with files, lists, and data bases of all kinds.

1 title and statement of responsibility area1
1. TITLE AND STATEMENT OF RESPONSIBILITY AREA

• Transcribe the title proper in a note. If the title has been supplied, give source of supplied title in a note. Example: Title from title screen Title from catalog record provided by the producer Title from code book

• Give immediately following the title proper the appropriate general material designation. Example: Gertrude’ s puzzles [electronic resource]

slide8

• Statement of Responsibility

Transcribe statements of responsibility relating to those persons bodies credited with a major role in creating the content of the resource. Example: The China study [electronic resource] / principal investigator, Angus Campbell Moby Dick [electronic resource] / by

Herman Melville ; compiled and produced by

Princeton University Computer

Center under the direction of Robert Knight.

2 edition area
2. EDITION AREA

• Precede this area by a full stop, space, dash space.

• Transcribe a statement relating to an edition of an electronic resource that contains differences from other editions of that resource, or to a named reissue of a resource.

Example: Rev. ed. Version5.20 NORC test ed. [Version] 1.1 3rd update Interactive version

• Transcribe a statement of responsibility relating to one or more revisions of an edition. Example: 3rd ed., Version 1.2 / programmed by

W.G. Trepfer

3 type extent of resource area
3. TYPE & EXTENT OF RESOURCE AREA

• Precede this area by a full stop, space, dash space.

• Enclose each statement of extent in parentheses.

• Precede a statement of the number of records statements, etc. by a colon when that statement follows a statement of the number of files.

3 type extent of resource area1
3. TYPE & EXTENT OF RESOURCE AREA

• Type of resource. Indicate the type of electronic

resource being cataloged. Use one of the ff. terms: a. electronic data b. electronic program (s)

c. electronic data and program(s)

  • Example of data: Electronic data (1 file : 350 records) Electronic data (1 file : 2.5 gb) Electronic data (1 file: 1.2 megabytes)
  • Example of programs: Electronic program (1 file : 200 statements)
  • Electronic program (2150 statements)
  • Example of Multipart files: Electronic data (3 files: 100, 460, 550 records) Electronic data (2 files : 4300, 1250 bytes)
4 publication distribution etc area
4. PUBLICATION, DISTRIBUTION, ETC. AREA

• Precede this area by a full stop, space, dash, space.

• Give the place of publication, distribution of a published electronic resource.

• Do not record [s.l.] for an unpublished electronic resource.Example: Bellevue, Wash. : Temporal Acuity Products; Owatonna, Minn. : Distributed exclusively by S Musictronic. [Honolulu?] : M.R. Ogden (personal homepage)

slide13

• Give the date of publication of a published electronic resource.

Example:

Richmond, Va. : Rhiannon Software, c1985.

a extent of item including specific material designation
A. Extent of item (including specific material designation)

• Record the number of physical units of the carrier by giving the number of them in Arabic numerals and one of the following terms as appropriate: computer cartridge computer cassette computer disk computer optical disk computer reel Ex. 1 computer disk 2 computer cassettes

a extent of item including specific material designation1
A. Extent of item (including specific material designation)
  • • When new physical carriers are developed for which none of these terms are appropriate, give the specific name of the physical carrier as concisely as possible, preferably qualified by computer. Ex. 1 computer card
  • • If the information is readily available and if desired, indicate the specific type of physical medium.
  • Ex. 1 computer chip cartridge 1 computer tape cartridge 1 computer tape reel
a extent of item including specific material designation2
A. Extent of item (including specific material designation)

• Optionally, if general material designations are used, omit computer from the specific material designation.

• Give a trade name or other similar specification in a note.

• If the description is of a separately titled part of an item lacking collective title express the fractional extent inthe form: on reel2 on 3 of 5 disks

on 1 disk

b other physical details
B. Other physical details

• If the file is encoded to produce sound, give sd. If the file is encoded to display in two or more colours, give col. Ex. 1 computer chip cartridge: sd. 1 computer disk: col. 1 computer disk: sd., col.

• Give the details of the requirements

for the production of sound or the

display of colour in a note.

b other physical details1
B. Other physical details

• Optionally, give the following physical characteristics, if readily available and if they are considered to be important:

number of sides used recording density (e.g., number of bytes per inch (bpi) single, double)

Ex.

1 computer disk: sd., col., soft sectored

2 computer tape reels : 5,432 bpi

c dimensions
C. Dimensions

• Give the dimensions of the physical carriera) Discs/Disks - give the diameter of the disk or disk in inches, to the next ¼ inch up Ex. 1 computer disk : col. ; 5 ¼in.

b) Cartridges - give, in inches to the next ¼ inch up,

the length of the sided f the cartridge that is to be

inserted into the machine

Ex. 1 computer chip cartridge; 3 1/2 in.

c dimensions1
C. Dimensions

c) Cassettes - give the length and height of the face of the cassette in inches, to the next 1/8 inch up

Ex. 1 computer cassette ; 3 7/8 X 2 1/2 in.

d) Reels - do not give dimensions for reels

e) Other carriers - give the appropriate dimensions of other physical carriers in centimeters to the next whole centimeter up Ex. 1 computer card; 5 X 6 cm.

• If the item consists of more than one physical carrier and they differ in size, give the smallest or the smaller and the largest or larger size, separated by ahyphen.

Ex. 3 computer disks ; 3 ½ - 5 ¼ in.

d accompanying material
D. Accompanying Material

• Give the details of accompanying material Ex. 1 computer disk ; 5¼ in. + 1 user’s guide 1 computer cassette : col. ; 3 7/8 X 2½ in. +

1 sound cassette 1 computer disk; 3 1/2 in. + 1 demonstration disk + 1 codebook 1 computer cassette; 3 7/8X 2½ in. + 7 maps

• If no physical description is given, give details of any accompanying material in a note.

series area1
SERIES AREA

Record each series statement as instructed in 1.6 of AACR2

a punctuation
A. Punctuation

• Separate introductory wording from the main content of a note by a colon followed but not preceded by a space.

b notes
B. Notes

• Make notes as set out in the following sub rules and in the order given there. However, give a particular note first when it has been decided that note is of primary importance.

c nature and scope and system requirements
C. Nature and scope and system requirements

a) Nature and scope - make notes on the nature or scope of the file unless it is apparent from the rest of the description Ex. Word processor

b) System requirements - begin the note with System requirements:.

c nature and scope and system requirements1
C. Nature and scope and system requirements
  • Give the following characteristics in the order in which they are listed below. Precede each characteristic, other than the first, by a semicolon. • The make and model of the computer(s) on which the file is designed to run • The amount of memory required • The name of the operating system • The software requirements (including the programming language) • The kind and characteristics of any required or recommended peripherals
  • Ex. System requirements: IBM PC; 64K; colour card; 2 disk drives System requirements : IBM PC AT or XT; CD-ROM player and drive
c nature and scope and system requirements2
C. Nature and scope and system requirements

c) Mode of access - if a file is available only by remote access, always specify the mode of access.

Ex. Online access via Telnet Mode of access: Electronic mail using ARPA

d) Language and script

  • Give the language(s) and/or script(s) of the spoken or written content of a file unless this is apparent from the rest of the description

Ex. In Italian

  • Record the programming language as part of the system requirements note.
c nature and scope and system requirements3
C. Nature and scope and system requirements

e) Source of title proper

  • Always give the sources of the title proper

Ex. Title from title screen

Title supplied by cataloger

f) Variations in title

  • Make notes on titles borne by the item other than the title proper.

Ex. Title on manual : Compu-math decimals

Also known as : MAXLIK

slide32

Optionally, give a romanization of the title proper

  • Optionally, transcribe a file name or data set name

Ex. File name : CC.RIDER

slide33

g) Parallel titles and other title information

  • Give the title in another language and other title information not recorded in the title and statement of responsibility area if they are considered important.

h) Statements of responsibility

  • Make notes on variant names of persons or bodies named in statements of responsibility if they are considered to be important for identification
slide34

Give statements of responsibility not recorded in the title and statement of responsibility area.

  • Make notes on persons or bodies connected with a work or significant persons or bodies connected with previous editions and not already named in the description.

Ex. Additional contributors to program : Iyra Buenrostro, Janine Buenrostro

Systems designer, Iyra Buenrostro ; sound, J-9 acoustics

slide35

Edition and History

  • Give the source of the edition statement of it is different from that of the title proper

Ex. Ed. Statement from container label

  • Make notes relating to the edition being described or to the history of the item.

Ex. Program first issued in 1982

  • Give details of minor changes if they are considered to be important.

Ex. Monochrome version recoded for colour

slide36

Cite other works upon which the item depends for its content.

Ex. Based on : Cinderella / Ever After ; edited by Andy Tennant. Oxford: 20th Century Fox, 1978-1991.

slide37

Give the following dates and details about them if they are considered to be important to the understanding of the content, use or nature of the file:

-- the date(s) covered by the content of a file

-- the date(s) when data were collected

-- the date(s) of accompanying material not described separately if they differ from those of the file being described

Ex. Data collected May-Oct. 1999

slide38

j) File characteristics

  • Give important file characteristics that are not included in the file characteristics area

Ex. Hierarchical file structure

File size unknown

File size varies

  • If a file consists of numerous parts the numbering of which cannot be given succinctly in the file characteristics are, and if the info. is considered to be important, give the number or approximate number of records, statements, etc., in each part.

Ex. File size: ca. 35, 25, 36, kilobytes

slide39

k) Publication, distribution, etc.

  • Make notes on publication, distribution, etc., details that are not included in the publication, distribution, etc., area and are considered to be important.

Ex. Solely distributed by the Laboratory

slide40

l) Physical description

  • Make notes on important physical details that are not included in the physical description area, especially if these affect the use of the item.
  • If the file is available only by remote access, give the physical details if they are readily available and considered important.

Ex. Stereo, Sd.

Display in red, yellow, and blue

slide41

m) Accompanying material

  • Make notes on the location of accompanying material if appropriate
  • Give details of accompanying material neither mentioned in the physical description area nor given a separate description

Ex. Accompanied by a series of 5 programs in PL/1, with assembler subroutines

slide42

n) Series

  • Make notes on series data that cannot be given in the series area.

Ex. Originally issued in series : European Community study series

o) Dissertations

  • If the item being described is a dissertation, make a note.

Ex. Thesis (M.A.)-University of Illinois, at Urbana Champaign, 1988

slide43

p) Audience

  • Make a brief note of the intended audience for, or intellectual level of, a file if this information is stated in or on the item, its container, or accompanying material.

Ex. For ages 18 and above

For use by qualified medical practitioners only

slide44

q) Other formats

  • Give the details of other formats in which the content of the file has been issued

Ex. Data issued also in printed form and in microform

r) Summary

  • Give a brief objective summary of the purpose of an item unless another part of the description provides enough information

Ex. Summary: Eight versions of a video game for 1-2 players. To survive, players use laser cannons to destroy flying demons

slide45
b

s) Contents

  • List the parts of a file

Ex. Contents – Moby Dick – Dick Tracy – Last of the Mohicans – Tom Sawyer

  • Make notes on additional or partial contents when appropriate

t) Numbers

  • Give important numbers borne by the item other that ISBNs or ISSNs

Ex. APX-10050

slide46

u) Copy being described, library’s holdings, and restrictions on use

  • If desired, give a locally assigned file or data set name.
  • If desired, give the date when the content of the file was copied from, or transferred to, another source.

Ex. Copied June 1999

Restricted to scholarly use

slide47

v) With notes

  • If the title and statement of responsibility area contains a title that applies to only a part of an item lacking a collective title and therefore, more than one entry is made, make a note beginning with With : and listing the other separately titled works in the item in the order in which they appear there.

Ex. With : Uncle John’s jigsaw; U.S. Constitution - Scramble

a standard number
A. Standard Number
  • Give the ISBN or ISSN assigned to a published file

Ex. ISBN 0-89138-111-2 (codebook)

b key title
B. Key Title
  • Give the title of a serial file
c terms of availability optional addition
C. Terms of availability (optional addition)
  • Give the terms on which the item is available

Ex. ISBN 0-89138-111-2:$34.45 ($12.00 for students)

d qualification
D. Qualification
  • Add qualifications to the standard number and/or terms of availability.
sample catalog entry for an electronic resource
SAMPLE CATALOG ENTRY FOR AN ELECTRONIC RESOURCE

PN6101 Mann, Ron

M3 Poetry in motion [electronic resource] / by Ron Mann.

-- (Electronic data and program). – New York, N.Y. : Voyages,

c1994.

System requirements for Windows:

4865X-25 on higher CPU ; 4 MB RAM (8 MB recommended);

Windows 3.1, DOS 5.0 or later ; MPC-compatible CD-ROM drive ;

sound card with speakers or headphones.

Title from disc label.

Summary : Presents the performances of contemporary poets such as Amiri Baraks, William S. Burroughs and Alan Ginsberg.

Includes some interviews.

1. American poetry – 20th century – History and criticism.

2. Poetry, Modern – 20th century. 3. Poets – 20th century – Interviews.

I. Title.

complete descriptions machine readable cataloging2
Complete Descriptions &Machine-Readable Cataloging

AACR2R description of the print serial

complete descriptions machine readable cataloging3
Complete Descriptions &Machine-Readable Cataloging

MARC record for the print serial

(Source: OCLC Connexion, WorldCat-record number 34108984)

complete descriptions and machine readable cataloging
Complete Descriptions andMachine-Readable Cataloging

AACR2R description of the electronic serial