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Achieving Student & Advisor Success Through Appreciative Advising. Lisa Allen, M.S. Program Coordinator & Academic Advisor Utah State University Tami Spackman Academic Advisor Utah State University. The Privilege of Working in Higher Education.

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Achieving Student & Advisor Success Through Appreciative Advising


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    1. Achieving Student & Advisor Success Through Appreciative Advising Lisa Allen, M.S.Program Coordinator & Academic AdvisorUtah State UniversityTami SpackmanAcademic AdvisorUtah State University

    2. The Privilege of Working in Higher Education “Education is the most powerful means of increasing individual opportunity and creating more prosperous, fairer, and more just societies. So to have the privilege of participating in that mission is as much as anybody could hope for in life.” • B. Joseph White, University of Illinois Reiter, A. F. (2005). Meet Joe White: New UI president talks about leadership, goals and responsibility.” Illinois Alumni Magazine, 17(5), 20–23.

    3. What is Student Success?

    4. The Joy of Advising “High impact advisors realize that the positive outcomes of advising sessions are not just limited to students; in fact, the real joy of advising occurs when advisors understand how fulfilling it is to really impact other peoples’ lives and how much they can learn from their advisees.” - Jennifer Bloom

    5. Starfish You can make a difference

    6. Appreciative Advising Definition “Appreciative Advising is the intentional collaborative practice of asking positive, open-ended questions that help students optimize their educational experiences and achieve their dreams, goals, and potentials.” • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    7. UNCG Programs Using Appreciative Advising • First-Year Experience Program – University Studies Course • Retention Program – Student Strategies for Success Course • Success Contract Program – Students Returning from Suspension or Dismissal • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    8. Retention Program- UNC • In a pre-post survey measuring learning objectives, 17 of the learning objectives experienced greater than 5% growth. • Instructors were very highly rated, with approximately 85% of SAS 100 and 200 students reporting that they found their instructors to be professional, helpful, understanding, knowledgeable, and organized. • Received both the Noel-Levitz Excellence in Retention Award and NACADA Outstanding Program Award in 2004. • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    9. Appreciative Advising Inventory3. I attend all my classes

    10. Appreciative Advising Inventory44. I successfully balance my academic pursuits with my personal life.

    11. Benefits of Appreciative Advising

    12. The Six Phases of Appreciative Advising • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    13. DISARM • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    14. Which grade would you want to talk about? English - A History - A Biology - B Phys Ed - B+ Math - F Rath, T., & Clifton, D. O. (2004). How full is your bucket? Positive strategies for work and life. New York: Gallup Press.

    15. Disarm Phase Prerequisite • Believe in the goodness of each student who walks through your door. Treat them like you would want your son/daughter/best friend treated. “The people who make a difference in your life are not the ones with the most credentials, the most money, or the most awards. They are the ones that care.” - Author Unknown • Bloom, J. and Martin, N.A. (2002, August 29). Incorporating appreciative inquiry into academic advising. The Mentor: An Academic Advising Journal, 4 (3). http://www.psu.edu/dus/mentor/020829jb.htm

    16. Important Advisor Behaviors • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    17. Disarming Questions • So what has been the highlight of your day so far? • Does Logan remind you of your hometown? • Tell me about your week? • I was just reading an article in the Statesman about ___________, did you see that? What did you think about that article? • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    18. DISCOVER • Bloom, J. and Martin, N.A. (2002, August 29). Incorporating appreciative inquiry into academic advising. The Mentor: An Academic Advising Journal, 4 (3). http://www.psu.edu/dus/mentor/020829jb.htm

    19. Important Advisor Behaviors Ask positive open questions that help us learn our students’ stories. • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    20. Important Advisor Behaviors • Listening! • Affirming/rephrasing/ summarizing what student is saying: • “I’m impressed by…..” • Pointing out specific times the student took initiative (creator instead of victim language) • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    21. Discover Questions for Students Habley, W. R., & Bloom, J. L. (2007). Giving advice that makes a difference. In G. L. Kramer (Ed.), Fostering student success in the campus community (pp. 171–92). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    22. DREAM • Bloom, J. and Martin, N.A. (2002, August 29). Incorporating appreciative inquiry into academic advising. The Mentor: An Academic Advising Journal, 4 (3). http://www.psu.edu/dus/mentor/020829jb.htm

    23. Definition of Dream • “An aspiration; goal; aim • A condition or achievement that is longed for” http://www.dictionary.com

    24. Important Advisor Behaviors • Listen purposefully • Make connections between information from the Discover phase and dreams being shared during this phase. Is there congruency between the two phases? • Encourage students to be open to the possibilities and remind them that there is more than one right answer • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    25. Dream Questions • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    26. DESIGN • Bloom, J. and Martin, N.A. (2002, August 29). Incorporating appreciative inquiry into academic advising. The Mentor: An Academic Advising Journal, 4 (3). http://www.psu.edu/dus/mentor/020829jb.htm

    27. Co-Creating a Plan “When people select their own goals, they are likely to have greater self-involvement in achieving them. If goals are prescribed by others, however, individuals do not necessarily accept them or feel obligated to meet them” – Albert Bandura Bandura, A. Self Efficacy: The Exercise of Control, p. 218

    28. Design PhaseDeveloping an Action Plan • Work together to set goals and specific sub-goals • Establish a realistic timeline for accomplishment of goals • Clarify who is responsible for what by what date • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    29. How to Make Decisions • Share options • Discuss pros and cons of each option • Discuss ramifications of each option • Do homework on each option • “Trusting your instincts” –tends to make better choices. • Student makes the decision • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    30. Important Advisor Behaviors • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    31. Design Questions Habley, W. R., & Bloom, J. L. (2007). Giving advice that makes a difference. In G. L. Kramer (Ed.), Fostering student successin the campus community (pp. 171-192). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    32. DELIVER • Bloom, J. and Martin, N.A. (2002, August 29). Incorporating appreciative inquiry into academic advising. The Mentor: An Academic Advising Journal, 4 (3). http://www.psu.edu/dus/mentor/020829jb.htm

    33. ImportantAdvisorBehaviors • Review what you have accomplished in this session • Review the student’s responsibilities and your responsibilities and the deadlines you have co-established • Encourage the student to contact you with any problems or concerns • Reiterate your confidence that the student can indeed accomplish the goals set forth • Energize your students to do their best • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    34. Deliver Phase Questions Habley, W. R., & Bloom, J. L. (2007). Giving advice that makes a difference. In G. L. Kramer (Ed.), Fostering student successin the campus community (pp. 171-192). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    35. DON’T SETTLE • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    36. “Good is the enemy of great.” • Collins, J. (2001). Good to great: Why some companies make the leap and others don’t. New York: HarperCollinsPublishers.

    37. Settling “We don’t have great schools, principally because we have good schools. Few people attain great lives, in large part because it is just so easy to settle for a good life.” • Collins, J. (2001). Good to great: Why some companies make the leap and others don’t. New York: HarperCollinsPublishers.

    38. Don’t Settle Questions • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    39. The Six Phases of Appreciative Advising • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    40. Want to learn more? http://www.appreciativeadvising.com/Bloom.pdf