welcome to becks woods medical center n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Welcome to Becks Woods Medical Center PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Welcome to Becks Woods Medical Center

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 47

Welcome to Becks Woods Medical Center - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 219 Views
  • Uploaded on

Welcome to Becks Woods Medical Center. OFFICE OF:. Medical Associates of Bear Dr. Rene Badillo Dr. Maricar Belicena-Badillo Glasgow Family Practice of Delaware, LLC Dr. Gregory Adams Dr. Rhoneise Barnett-Smith Kyra Downing PA-C Esther Thompson PA-C. OFFICE OF:. Irene C. Szeto, MD

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Welcome to Becks Woods Medical Center' - eadoin


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
office of
OFFICE OF:
  • Medical Associates of Bear
    • Dr. Rene Badillo
    • Dr. Maricar Belicena-Badillo
  • Glasgow Family Practice of Delaware, LLC
    • Dr. Gregory Adams
    • Dr. Rhoneise Barnett-Smith
    • Kyra Downing PA-C
    • Esther Thompson PA-C
office of1
OFFICE OF:
  • Irene C. Szeto, MD
  • Dr. Nieva T. Duque-Salva, MD
  • Pulmonary and Sleep Consultants
    • Dr. Ghazala Farooqui
    • Dr. Masood Siddiqui
  • Affinity Women’s Health
    • Dr. Stanley Raymond Wiercinski, DO
slide4

Please be advised that all copayments are due at time of service

  • Be sure that you check in with the receptionist and inform us of any changes in: insurance, address, or phone number
  • Thank you for your cooperation!
slide5

Diabetes means that blood glucose (sugar) is too high – too much glucose is not healthy

  • Diabetes affects 25.8 million people of all ages
    • 8.3 percent of the U.S. population
  • Can cause serious health problems

diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/statistics/#fast

diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes among people ages 20 years or older united states 2010
Diagnosed and Undiagnosed Diabetes among People Ages 20 Years or Older, United States, 2010

diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/statistics/#fast

slide8

Among adults with diagnosed diabetes—type 1 or type 2—12 percent take insulin only, 14 percent take both insulin and oral medication, 58 percent take oral medication only, and 16 percent do not take either insulin or oral medication.

diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/statistics/#fast

help with diabetes
Help with Diabetes
  • Glucose Control
  • Blood Pressure Control
  • Control of Blood Lipids
  • Preventive Care Practices for Eyes, Feet, and Kidneys

diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/statistics/#fast

diabetes glucose control
Diabetes – Glucose Control
  • Every percentage point drop in A1C blood test results, for example, from 8.0 to 7.0 percent, can reduce the risk of microvascular complications—eye, kidney, and nerve diseases—by 40 percent.

diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/statistics/#fast

diabetes blood pressure control
Diabetes – Blood Pressure Control
  • Reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease—heart disease or stroke—among people with diabetes by 33 to 50 percent and the risk of microvascular complications—eye, kidney, and nerve diseases—by about 33 percent.
  • For every 10 mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure, the risk for any complication related to diabetes is reduced by 12 percent

diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/statistics/#fast

diabetes control of blood lipids
Diabetes – Control of Blood Lipids
  • Improved control of LDL, or bad, cholesterol can reduce cardiovascular complications by 20 to 50 percent.

diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/statistics/#fast

diabetes preventative care
Diabetes – Preventative Care
  • Detecting and treating diabetic eye disease with laser therapy can reduce the development of severe vision loss by an estimated 50 to 60 percent.
  • Comprehensive foot care programs—ones that include risk assessment, foot-care education and preventive therapy, treatment of foot problems, and referral to specialists—can reduce amputation rates by 45 to 85 percent.

diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/statistics/#fast

monday is the day of the week when the risk of heart attack is greatest
Monday is the day of the week when the risk of heart attack is greatest.
  • Yet another reason to loathe Mondays!
  • A ten year study in Scotland found that 20% more people die of heart attacks on Mondays than any other day of the week.

Researchers theorize that it’s a combination of too much fun over the weekend with the stress of going back to work that causes the increase

over 90 of diseases are caused or complicated by stress
Over 90% of diseases are caused or complicated by stress.
  • That high stress job you have could be doing more than just wearing you down each day.

It could also be increasing your chances of having a variety of serious medical conditions like depression, high blood pressure and heart disease. So take a deep breath and relax!

nerve impulses to and from the brain travel as fast as 170 miles per hour
Nerve impulses to and from the brain travel as fast as 170 miles per hour!
  • Ever wonder how you can react so fast to things around you or why that stubbed toe hurts right away?
  • It’s due to the super-speedy movement of nerve impulses from your brain to the rest of your body and vice versa, bringing reactions at the speed of a high powered luxury sports car.
the brain operates on the same amount of power as 10 watt light bulb
The brain operates on the same amount of power as 10-watt light bulb.
  • The cartoon image of a light bulb over your head when a great thought occurs isn’t too far off the mark.
  • Your brain generates as much energy as a small light bulb even when you’re sleeping.
80 of the brain is water
80% of the brain is water.
  • Your brain isn’t the firm, gray mass you’ve seen on TV.
  • Living brain tissue is a squishy, pink and jelly-like organ thanks to the loads of blood and high water content of the tissue.
  • So the next time you’re feeling dehydrated get a drink to keep your brain hydrated.
what is stress
What is Stress?
  • A feeling you get when faced

with a challenge.

  • In small doses, stress can be good for you because it makes you more alert and gives you a burst of energy.
  • But feeling stressed for a long time can take a toll on your mental and physical health. Even though it may seem hard to find ways to de-stress with all the things you have to do, it's important to find those ways. Your health depends on it.

http://www.womenshealth.gov

causes of stress
Causes of Stress
  • Death of a spouse
  • Death of a close family member
  • Divorce
  • Losing your job
  • Major personal illness or injury
  • Marital separation
  • Marriage
  • Pregnancy
  • Retirement

http://www.womenshealth.gov

signs of stress

Not eating or eating too much

  • Feeling like you have no control
  • Needing to have too much control
  • Forgetfulness
  • Headaches
  • Lack of energy
  • Trouble getting things done
  • Poor self-esteem
  • Short temper
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Upset stomach
  • Back pain
  • General aches and pains
  • Lack of focus
Signs of Stress

http://www.womenshealth.gov

do women react to stress differently than men
Do women react to stress differently than men?
  • One recent survey found that women were more likely to experience physical symptoms of stress than men.
  • We do know that women often cope with stress in different ways than men.
    • Women “tend and befriend,” taking care of those closest to them, but also drawing support from friends and family.
    • Men are more likely to have the “fight or flight” response. They cope by “escaping” into a relaxing activity or other distraction.

http://www.womenshealth.gov

effect of stress on health
Effect of Stress on Health
  • The body responds to stress by releasing stress hormones.
  • These hormones make blood pressure, heart rate, and blood sugar levels go up. Long-term stress can help cause a variety of health problems, including:
    • Mental health disorders, like depression and anxiety
    • Obesity
    • Heart disease
    • High blood pressure
    • Abnormal heart beats
    • Menstrual problems
    • Acne and other skin problems

http://www.womenshealth.gov

handling stress
Handling Stress
  • Develop a new attitude
  • Relax
  • Take care of your body
  • Connect with others

http://www.womenshealth.gov

stress develop a new attitude
Stress – Develop a New Attitude!
  • Be flexible
    • Sometimes, it’s not worth the stress to argue. Give in once in awhile or meet people halfway.
  • Become a problem solver
    • Make a list of the things that cause you stress. From your list, figure out which problems you can solve now and which are beyond your control for the moment. From your list of problems that you can solve now, start with the little ones.

http://www.womenshealth.gov

stress relax
Stress - Relax
  • Take deep breaths.
    • If you're feeling stressed, taking a few deep breaths makes you breathe slower and helps your muscles relax.
  • Stretch.
    • Stretching can also help relax your muscles and make you feel less tense.
  • Massage tense muscles.
    • Having someone massage the muscles in the back of your neck and upper back can help you feel less tense.

http://www.womenshealth.gov

stress take care of your body
Stress – Take Care of Your Body
  • Get enough sleep.
  • Eat right.
    • Try to fuel up with fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains.
  • Get moving.
    • Getting physical activity can not only help relax your tense muscles but improve your mood.
    • Research shows that physical activity can help relieve symptoms of depression and anxiety.

http://www.womenshealth.gov

stress connect with others
Stress – Connect with Others
  • Share your stress.
    • Talking about your problems with friends or family members can sometimes help you feel better.
    • They might also help you see your problems in a new way and suggest solutions that you hadn't thought of.
  • Help others.
    • Volunteering in your community can help you make new friends and feel better about yourself.

http://www.womenshealth.gov

facial hair grows faster than any other hair on the body
Facial hair grows faster than any other hair on the body.
  • If you’ve ever had a covering of stubble on your face as you’re clocking out at 5 o’clock you’re probably pretty familiar with this.
  • In fact, if the average man never shaved his beard it would grow to over 30 feet during his lifetime, longer than a killer whale.
nutrition fitness and weight
Nutrition, Fitness and Weight
  • Bad: One in four Americans eats fast food at least once a day.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/20/AR2008052001629.html

nutrition fitness and weight1
Nutrition, Fitness and Weight
  • BAD: Most cereals made for kids contain more calories, sugar and salt and less fiber and protein than other cereals. Most kids' cereals don't meet national school nutrition standards.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/20/AR2008052001629.html

nutrition fitness and weight2
Nutrition, Fitness and Weight
  • Good: Eat according to the colors of the rainbow. The more colors to your food -- such as the reds, oranges, yellows, greens and even blues of fruits and vegetables -- the more important nutrients you'll get.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/20/AR2008052001629.html

nutrition fitness and weight3
Nutrition, Fitness and Weight
  • Good: Your brain depends on your stomach to signal that it's full, but that message takes 20 minutes to be delivered. So slow down during meals, and you'll be less likely to eat too much.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/20/AR2008052001629.html

nutrition fitness and weight4
Nutrition, Fitness and Weight
  • Bad: If you eat even 100 calories more a day than you burn by being active, that "energy gap" could add 10 pounds a year.
  • How much is 100 calories? Half a glazed doughnut.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/20/AR2008052001629.html

nutrition fitness and weight5
Nutrition, Fitness and Weight
  • Good: Almost every day kids should have at least an hour of what the experts call moderate-intensity physical activity such as walking the dog (not slowly), riding your bike or dancing to your favorite songs.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/20/AR2008052001629.html

nutrition fitness and weight6
Nutrition, Fitness and Weight
  • Good: You usually feel happier after playing or exercising because of special chemicals called endorphins that your brain releases while you're moving. Endorphins are a natural mood-booster!

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/20/AR2008052001629.html

nutrition fitness and weight7
Nutrition, Fitness and Weight
  • Really bad: Fewer than 1 in 25 elementary schools and fewer than 1 in 13 middle schools in this country provide daily P.E. classes for all students. And many elementary schools have cut out recess.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/20/AR2008052001629.html

nutrition fitness and weight8
Nutrition, Fitness and Weight
  • Do better: States in New England and out west have the most physically active residents; southern states have the most couch potatoes.
  • When the federal government measured this last year, Virginians were slightly more on the move than Marylanders.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/20/AR2008052001629.html

nutrition fitness and weight9
Nutrition, Fitness and Weight
  • Bad: One in three American kids and teens is overweight or heavy enough to be considered obese.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/20/AR2008052001629.html

a slice of pizza should be the size of
A slice of pizza should be the size of:
  • A) My Face
  • B) My Plate
  • C) A sheet of Paper
  • D) Two dollar bills

http://fit.webmd.com/teen/food/default.htm

a slice of pizza should be the size of1
A slice of pizza should be the size of:
  • A) My Face
  • B) My Plate
  • C) A sheet of Paper
  • D) Two dollar bills

http://fit.webmd.com/teen/food/default.htm

slide42
A typical order of fries 20 years ago was 210 calories. How many calories do you get from a typical serving today?

A) 210

B) 300

C) 373

D) 610

http://fit.webmd.com/teen/food/default.htm

slide43
A typical order of fries 20 years ago was 210 calories. How many calories do you get from a typical serving today?

A) 210

B) 300

C) 373

D) 610

http://fit.webmd.com/teen/food/default.htm

what size serving of nuts makes for a healthy snack
What size serving of nuts makes for a healthy snack?
  • A) Golf ball-size
  • B) A handful
  • C) Baseball-size
  • D)Portion doesn't matter, they're healthy

http://fit.webmd.com/teen/food/default.htm

what size serving of nuts makes for a healthy snack1
What size serving of nuts makes for a healthy snack?
  • A) Golf ball-size
  • B) A handful
  • C) Baseball-size
  • D)Portion doesn't matter, they're healthy

http://fit.webmd.com/teen/food/default.htm

slide46

If you ordered a movie popcorn in the early 1990s, you would have been served about 5 cups. How big is a typical movie theater popcorn portion today?

  • A) 2 cups
  • B) 5 cups
  • C) 8 cups
  • D) 11 cups

http://fit.webmd.com/teen/food/default.htm

slide47

If you ordered a movie popcorn in the early 1990s, you would have been served about 5 cups. How big is a typical movie theater popcorn portion today?

  • A) 2 cups
  • B) 5 cups
  • C) 8 cups
  • D) 11 cups

http://fit.webmd.com/teen/food/default.htm