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Earthquake Alert Notifications for Energy Supply Infrastructure and Emergency Management in Australia and New Zealand Dr Hugh Cowan et al. APEC Seminar on Earthquake Disaster Management of Energy Supply Systems Taipei, September 3-4, 2003. Introduction.

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slide1

Earthquake Alert Notifications for Energy Supply Infrastructure and Emergency Management in Australia and New ZealandDr Hugh Cowan et al.APEC Seminar on Earthquake Disaster Management of Energy Supply Systems Taipei, September 3-4, 2003

introduction
Introduction
  • Dams and canals that store and transport water for hydro generation account for a high percentage of the fixed assets for energy supply systems.
introduction1
Introduction
  • Operations must ensure safety, utility and retain value. Dam failures although rare, would result in significant loss of credibility for all owners.
regulatory framework
Regulatory Framework
  • No specific dam safety legislation, but well-developed guidelines (ANCOLD, NZSOLD)
  • Dam Safety Assurance Programs make a major contribution to fulfilling the requirements of responsible ownership.
establish the context
Establish the context

Risk Model – AS/NZS 4360:1999

Identify risks

Analyse risks

Monitor and review

Communicate and consult

Evaluate risks

Treat risks

establish the context1
Establish the context

How do our outputs relate to local government, emergency services and other agencies’ Civil Defence arrangements?

Monitor and review

Communicate and consult

establish the context2
Establish the context

Identify risks

What external risks do we face e.g. inter-related agencies’ outsourcing contracts?

(all hazards)

Monitor and review

Communicate and consult

establish the context3
Establish the context

Identify risks

Analyse risks

Monitor and review

Communicate and consult

What planning and activity helps address this risk across the 4R’s?

slide12

Are our arrangements coordinated across our sector?

Is our sector linked to others involved in CDEM?

Monitor and review

Communicate and consult

Treat risks

slide13

Normal Dam Safety Event

Earthquake Dam Safety Event

Flood Dam Safety Event

ACTION

Dam Safety Emergency Plan

(e.g. Hydro Tasmania)

DIFFERENT

LOADING CONDITIONS

  • Sunny day failures
  • Abnormal seepage
  • Acts of sabotage
  • Operational incidents
earthquake alerts
Earthquake Alerts
  • Earthquake Alert Notifications contribute directly to Emergency Preparedness by defining priorities for inspection of facilities after any significant event.
  • Examples follow: Victoria, New South Wales, Tasmania and New Zealand
slide19

(POA)

Poatina

(MARG)

Lake Margaret

VSAT

(MTCL)

Mt. Claude

(TRR)

Tarraleah

(GDAM)

Gordon Dam (non dial-up)

(SCOT)

NEW Scotts Peak

slide21

New Zealand

High seismic hazard

in some regions

Sparsely populated

Isolated high-value assets

Long, linear transmission

infrastructure

slide22

1950 - 2000

1840 - 2000

M 7.0 +

M 6.5 - 6.9

slide23

Most destructive historical earthquakes

occurred before 1950.

Few people today have personal experience of damage or losses

key points
Key Points
  • Regions of low seismic hazard can experience damaging earthquakes
  • Regions of high seismic hazard may experience decades of relative quiet
slide25

New Zealand GeoNet

  • National coverage for hazard detection and emergency response
  • Designed, built and operated on a non-profit basis, with all basic data freely available
  • Supplemented by local monitoring at high-value assets
slide27

National Broadband

Seismograph Network

communications
Communications
  • Some Options:
    • Radio: spread spectrum, VHF/UHF
    • Dial up: manual/automatic, land line/GSM/CDMA
    • Leased (analog) lines
    • Digital Direct lines
    • Frame relay
    • Satellite (VSAT)
    • Internet
slide29

Strong Motion National

Network

New Zealand

Dial-out on GSM and

leased

land lines

current preferred options
Current Preferred Options
  • Short distances:

Spread spectrum radio (Ethernet radio bridges)

  • Medium distances:

Dial up telephone or DDS

  • Long distances:

Internet or frame relay, usually with a local short or medium link

Satellite (typically VSAT)

use of earthquake alerts for emergency response meridian energy ltd
Use of Earthquake Alerts for Emergency Response: Meridian Energy Ltd

Dam Safety Em

ergency Response Process

Dam Safety Response

Co

-

ordinator

Inform Emergency

Generation Controller

Dam Safety

Manager

Yes

Generation Controller

Dam

≥5MMV earthquake

Response

3.

Contact Dam Safety

SafetyResponse

occurs or observation

Coord.

OK?

Response Co

-

Team

Report to dam

indicating Level 1 alert.

ordinator (DSRC)

Carry out inspection

Dam Safety Response

safety assurance

4.

Advise of any

using checklist

Co

-

ordinator

team*

alarms or potential

Call out Earthquake

No

safety issues

Response Team to

including loss of

relevant site(s)

commu

nications

Dam Safety Response

Emergency Manager

Generation Controller

Co

-

ordinator

Dam Safety Emergency Response Plan

1.

Contact Dam Safety

Inform Emergency

(DSERP)

Generation Controller

Response Co

-

ordinator

Manager

Other Event or

(DSRC)

Observation indicative of

2.

Advise of any alarms

Level 2 or Level 3 Alert

or potential safety

Dam Safety Response

issues includi

ng loss

Co

-

ordinator

of communications

Compile /Call out Dam

Safety Response Team

epar dataflow
EPAR Dataflow

*Asset

Vulnerabilities

*Planned

Task List

*Asset

Locations

Earthquake

Earthquake

Location

Magnitude

Importance

Priority

Importance

Distance

Appropriate

General

Outcomes

Specific

Outcomes

Task List

Attenuation

SPECIFIC OUTCOMES for

TASKS for Pipehead Control Room

Pipehead Control Room in order of

in order of priority.

GENERAL OUTCOMES in order of

interest.

importance.

Upper Cascade Dam (31km,

Telephone Blue Mountains System,

MMI 3):

inform them of the event and

Vibrations felt by some.

instruct them that no action is

The Intensity at the epicentre would

necessary at Upper Cascade

Intensity calculated

be about MMI 4.

Middle Cascade Dam (31km,

Dam,

MMI 3):

Middle Cascade Dam, Lower

Intensities exceeding MMI 4 with

Vibrations felt by some.

Cascade Dam, Lake Medlow, and

the earthquake being strongly felt

for every location

Greaves

by most people can be expected to

Lower Cascade Dam (32km,

Creek.

a distance of 13km.

MMI 3):

Vibrations felt by some.

No other tasks prescribed.

Intensities exceeding MMI 2 and

the possibility that the earthquake

Greaves Creek (32km, MMI 3):

will be felt by some people can be

Asset Locations

Vibrations felt by some.

expected to a distance of 68km.

*

Asset Vulnerabilities

Damage Expected

Fax or Email

Task List

report to users

slide35
Hugh Cowan Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Ltd, Wellington, New Zealand

Wayne Peck Seismology Research Centre, Environmental Systems and Services, Melbourne, Australia

Roy Fenderson Hydro Tasmania, Hobart, Australia

Jim Walker Meridian Energy Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Colin Hill Melbourne Water, Melbourne, Australia

Tan Pham AC Consulting Group Ltd, Wellington, New Zealand