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Support Groups for Military Family and Significant Other
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  1. Support Groups for Military Family and Significant Other Tomoko KudoGrabosky, Ph.D. Shippensburg University

  2. Why support group? • More families of military services members are using GI Bills to attend colleges and universities. • Family members with deployed service members have significantly higher stress than civilians (Davis& Treiber, 2007). • It is estimated that 25 percent of soldiers in Iraq had "significantothers" who are not spouses (Fontaine,2009). • There is no formal support available to military significant others.

  3. Common Difficulties among Military Families • “Unfriendly” policies and procedures • Lack of funds/benefits slow to arrive • Constant worries about the service member’s safety • Increased responsibility in household • Communication Difficulties • “Others don’t understand” • Dealing with other’s insensitive comments after deployment • Dealing with readjustment issues and changes, relationship issues, multiple-deployment, etc. Source: Frantz & Pfeffer (2010)

  4. Collaborative Model

  5. Group Composition Members • Spouse • Siblings • Parents • Relatives • Significant Others • Veterans • Active members • Reserve members Facilitators • Counselor • Counseling skills, college student issues, campus resources, crisis management • Family Care Specialist • Military specific information, Deployment cycle, integration issues, military family issues, off campus military specific resources

  6. Types of Social Support Forsyth (1999)

  7. Seven Stages of the Emotional Cycle of DeploymentJennifer Morse, MD

  8. Contact Information Tomoko KudoGrabosky, Ph.D. Department of Counseling Services Shippensburg University 1871 Old Main Drive Shippensburg, PA 17257 (717) 477-1481 tkgrab@ship.edu

  9. References • Davis, H., & Treiber, F.A. (2007). Perceived stress, heart rate, and blood pressure among adolescents with family members, deployed in Operation Iraq Freedom, Military medicine, 172, 40-43. • Demers, A. (2009). The war at home: Consequences of loving a veteran of the Iraq and Afghanistan. Internet Journal of Mental Health, 15312941, 20090101, Vol. 6, Issue 1 • Forsyth, D. R. (1999). Group dynamics, (3rd ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing company. • Fontaine, S. (2009, November 22). It’s marriage license that counts for military. The News Tribune. • Frantz, S., & Pfeffer, D. (2010). Veterans on campus: Are you ready? A webinar presented at Paper Clip Communications, May, 20, 2010 2 – 3:30 pm EST.