DO THE FOLLOWING: Pick up a warm up sheet on your way into class - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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DO THE FOLLOWING: Pick up a warm up sheet on your way into class

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  1. DO THE FOLLOWING: Pick up a warm up sheet on your way into class Get out summary of Odes III.1 and response to question about first stanza of the poem

  2. WARM UP 10/12/12 • Exchange your written comments with another person sitting nearby who completed the assignment • Based on what you read in Odes III.1 What characteristics would Horace bring up if he were to respond to the question "what is a Roman?" I have no use for secular outsiders, I bar the gross crowd. Give me reverent silence. I am the Muses’ priest: I sing for maidens and for boys grave verse Unheard before. Earth’s kings may awe their own flocks, 5 But kings themselves are under Jove, the glorious Conqueror of the Giants, Who with an eyebrow moves the universe.

  3. VOCAB QUIZ NEXT FRIDAY 10/19/12 wds 1-15

  4. USE THE NOTESHEET TO KEEP TRACK OF WHAT MAGISTER IS ABOUT TO TELL YOU

  5. UNDERSTANDING THE CONTEXT OF ODES III.2A LITTLE HISTORY FIRST… 87 – 83 BC: Marius vs. Sulla 133 – 123 BC: Gracchi brothers 106: Ciceroborn 100: J. Caesar born 73 – 71 BC: Spartacus revolt 91 – 88 BC: Social wars: Italy vs. Rome 63 – 62 BC: Catilinarian conspiracy 43 – 42 BC: Octavian vs. Brutus 49 – 48 BC: Caesar vs. Pompey 48: Pompey assassinated 44: J. Caesar assassinated 38 – 31 BC: Octavian vs. Antony 43: Ciceroassassinated 42: Horace fights for Brutus at Philippi

  6. REVERSE SIDE OF NOTESHEET AND QUESTION # 1 SHOULD BE COMPLETED

  7. Meanwhile: political and moral corruption in Rome Corrupt governors : e.g. Verres, Sicily, 80 BC Corrupt and broken politics: e.g. Milo vs. Clodius, 60 – 53 BC Corrupt judicial system : throughout this time period Corrupt morals : evidenced in love poetry from 1st century BC

  8. QUESTION # 2 SHOULD BE COMPLETED

  9. What Octavian accomplished… 1.) 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.) Much more….

  10. HE BROUGHT AN END TO THIS UNDERSTANDING THE CONTEXT OF ODES III.2A LITTLE HISTORY FIRST… 87 – 83 BC: Marius vs. Sulla 133 – 123 BC: Gracchi brothers 106: Ciceroborn 100: J. Caesar born 73 – 71 BC: Spartacus revolt 91 – 88 BC: Social wars: Italy vs. Rome 63 – 62 BC: Catilinarian conspiracy 43 – 42 BC: Octavian vs. Brutus 49 – 48 BC: Caesar vs. Pompey 48: Pompey assassinated 44: J. Caesar assassinated 38 – 31 BC: Octavian vs. Antony 43: Ciceroassassinated 42: Horace fights for Brutus at Philippi

  11. What Octavian accomplished… 1.) Brought an end 120 years of civil carnage 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.) Much more…. Improved Roman roads throughout Mediterranean at his own expense when the Senate ran out of money to complete the projects (20 BC) Expanded Roman territory dramatically

  12. What Octavian accomplished… 1.) Brought an end 120 years of civil carnage 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.) Much more…. Improved Roman roads throughout Mediterranean at his own expense when the Senate ran out of money to complete the projects (20 BC) Expanded Roman territory dramatically Left the original structures of power in place, while in reality holding on to power Any surprise that he got the name Augustus in 27 BC?

  13. QUESTIONS # 3 - 4 SHOULD BE COMPLETED

  14. What Octavian accomplished…But at what cost? 15. After the fall of the city Augustus took vengeance on crowds of prisoners and returned the same answer to all who sued for pardon or tried to explain their presence among the rebels. It was simply: `You must die!' According to some historians, he chose 300 prisoners of equestrian or senatorial rank, and offered them on the ides of March at the altar of the God Julius, as human sacrifices. Augustus fought, it is said, because he wished to offer his secret enemies, and those whom fear rather than affection kept with his party, a chance to declare themselves by joining Lucius Antonius; he would then crush them, confiscate their estates, and thus manage to pay off his veterans. Augustus did consider the name Romulus as his honorific title before settling on Augustus… When Octavian was taking care of cities still loyal to Pompey in 41 BC: 14. At this point Lucius Antonius felt strong enough, as Consul and brother of the powerful Mark Antony, to raise a revolt. Augustus forced him to take refuge in the city of Perugia, which he starved into surrender, but only after being twice exposed to great danger. On the first occasion, before the revolt broke out, he had found a private soldier watching the Games from one of the seats reserved for knights, and ordered his removal by an attendant; when Augustus's enemies then circulated a rumour that the offender had been tortured and executed, an angry crowd of soldiers began to demonstrate at once and Augustus would have lost his life had not the missing soldier suddenly reappeared, safe and unhurt. On the second occasion Augustus was sacrificing close to the walls of Perugia, during the siege, when a party of gladiators made a sortie and nearly cut off his retreat.

  15. QUESTION # 5 SHOULD BE COMPLETED

  16. So, what does this all mean for Horace? • After so much conflict, Horace as a poet is left wondering: • “what is Roman?” • “What traits and characteristics are Roman?” • The first 6 Odes of book III spell out his response to what this question is (loosely) • In Odes III.2, he takes on Virtus amidst other core Roman values • Our essential question(s) for this poem: • How Does Odes III.2 stand in contrast to Odes III.1? • What is the significance of this contrast?

  17. QUESTION # 6 - 8 SHOULD BE COMPLETED

  18. REVIEW: What is a jussive?

  19. HOMEWORK: • Prepare Odes III.2.1-6 (…in rebus)