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LiveDrive Seminar
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LiveDrive Seminar

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  1. LiveDrive Seminar Information for Older Road Users

  2. Introduction • Discussion about road safety for older people. • Aim to: • Provide you with interesting and useful information. • Increase your awareness of road safety issues. • Help you be safer as a driver, pedestrian, or other road user. • While the subject is serious, we will attempt to include a bit of humour into the discussion.

  3. Interlude • It is said that if you line up all the cars in the world end to end, someone would be stupid enough to try and pass them. Now down to the discussion

  4. Introduction • Statistics show that older people are more vulnerable as road users. We are at greater risk of accident or death. • There are actions we can take to reduce that risk.

  5. Introduction • Depending on available time, we will look at: • Driving or being a passenger in a motor vehicle. • Being a pedestrian. • Riding a motor bike. • Riding a bicycle. • Using motorised scooters. • Alternative transport options.

  6. Introduction • We expect the talk to take up to 60 minutes.

  7. Older Persons • The United Nations defines anyone over 50 as an older person. • For road safety, statistics indicate major changes occur around age 65. • More significant change occurs for those aged 75 and over.

  8. Older Persons • Talking and informing people fromaround age 60 can make a significantdifference to their safety as road users. • Hence our presentation & discussion today.

  9. A Brief Word from our Sponsors • This seminar series is a community service ofCOTA National Seniors. • The NRMA-ACT Road Safety Trust provide the funding to make this possible.

  10. Older Road UsersHow do we fare? How do you think ageing influences your risk of being involved in a road accident? Discuss

  11. Background • Statistics provide us with an interestingbackdrop: • The ACT has fewer fatalities than other states, even allowing for population. • In 2003, we had 9 road fatalities which was one less than in 2002.

  12. Background • In 2003, the oldest person to die on our roads was 56, in 2002 three (3) people aged over 80 died. • In 2003, 52 people aged 60+ were injuredon ACT roads. • Remember, many of us drive interstate and contribute to their statistics rather than those of the ACT. (In particular we tend to contribute to those of NSW).

  13. Background • For Australia as a whole. (Data from 2002): • Total Fatalities = 1715. • Fatalities of those aged 65+ = 262.

  14. Background • Those aged 65+ = 15.3% of fatal accidents but only 12.7% of the total population. (i.e. fatalities are higher than we might expect.) • Women aged 65+ accounted for 35% of female pedestrian fatalities. • Men aged 65 + accounted for 21% of all male pedestrian fatalities.

  15. Background • Let’s examine what type of activities have the most fatalities for those aged 65+.

  16. Background Australian Road Fatalities 2002 – Age 65+

  17. Background • When the number of accidents per kilometre driven is analysed older people are at the greatest risk of being killed or seriously injured on the road!

  18. Background • Consider the following graph in which the number of road accident deaths in each age is compared to the risk of the age group with the lowest number of fatalities (those aged 40 – 50).

  19. Background Relative Risk per Million Km Travelled

  20. Background • Older drivers (those aged 65+) are more likely to die on the road than any other age group other than those aged 17-25 – when adjusted for distance travelled. • Older road users in general have the greatest risk of dying or being seriously injured as a result of a road accident.

  21. Background • We owe it to ourselves and other road users to take action to maintain and update our knowledge and skills.

  22. Interlude • After all that bad news we need some light relief! Now back to the discussion

  23. Impact of Ageing • Whether we are the driver of a motor vehicle, a passenger, a pedestrian, or the user of other forms of transport, the impact of ageing is unavoidable.

  24. Impact of Ageing • Some of the many things that may affect us include: • Deteriorating Eyesight. • Deteriorating Hearing. • Reduced Physical Strength & Flexibility.

  25. Impact of Ageing • Some of the many things that may affect us include: • Onset of Age-related Diseases (e.g. arthritis). • Thinking and Perception Changes (e.g. reaction time). • The Side effects of taking Medications.

  26. Impact of Ageing Deteriorating Eyesight • Even where our eyesight is good, as we age, our sensitivity to contrast reduces. This makes it harder to see: • Road dividers. • Some painted road signs. • Items in shady areas.

  27. Impact of Ageing Deteriorating Eyesight • Even where our eyesight is good, as we age, our sensitivity to contrast reduces. This makes it harder to see: • At dusk. • At night or in bright sunny conditions.

  28. Impact of Ageing Deteriorating Eyesight • Our ability to observe oncoming vehicles may be reduced. • Loss of peripheral sight or tunnel vision can make it difficult to be aware of movement to our left or right.

  29. Impact of Ageing Deteriorating Hearing • Hearing declines from about the age of 25 and can be particularly tricky to observe as the decline tends to creep up on us. • Hearing loss makes it harder to hear other cars, honking horns, emergency vehicles, and screeching tyres.

  30. Impact of Ageing Deteriorating Hearing • As drivers we may find that: • We don’t hear other vehicles. • Loud talking by others may distract us more than when we were younger (eg. grandchildren in the car). • We need to concentrate more to hear what is being said.

  31. Impact of Ageing Deteriorating Hearing • As pedestrians we may find that: • It is harder to hear approaching traffic. • Bicycles and others coming from behind surprise us. • It’s harder to hear the ‘pings’ of a traffic light indicator.

  32. Impact of Ageing Physical Changes and Diseases • As we age, we lose some muscle and bone mass. • We also tend to lose some flexibility and agility. • We are more likely to experience forms of arthritis. • Our sense of balance diminishes.

  33. Impact of Ageing Physical Changes and Diseases • As drivers, the impact of physical changes can include: • Reduced physical strength and flexibility making it difficult to respond quickly to emergencies. • Arthritis interfering with the required range of movements for safe driving.

  34. Impact of Ageing Physical Changes and Diseases • As drivers, the impact of physical changes can include: • A diminished sense of balance can reduce our ability to get feedback from steering and car movements.

  35. Impact of Ageing Physical Changes and Diseases • As pedestrians, the impact of physical changes can include: • Taking longer to cross the road. • Reduced physical strength and flexibility making it more difficult to get out of the way of fast moving vehicles.

  36. Impact of Ageing Thinking and Perception Changes • As we age, our reaction times reduce. • Our ability to judge the speed of oncoming vehicles reduces. • We tend to find it harder to remain focussed for long periods. • Our ability to respond to complex situations is reduced.

  37. Impact of Ageing Thinking and Perception Changes • As drivers this can mean that: • We need greater distance between us and other vehicles. • We can misjudge time available for turning across traffic.

  38. Impact of Ageing Thinking and Perception Changes • As drivers this can mean that: • We tire more easily – especially on longer trips. • Complex traffic situations become confusing.

  39. Impact of Ageing Thinking and Perception Changes • As pedestrians this can mean that: • We can misjudge the time required to cross roads. • We can underestimate the time it will take a car to reach us. • Complex traffic situations become confusing.

  40. Interlude • Drive carefully. It's not only cars that can be recalled by their maker.

  41. Impact of Ageing Medications • As we age, we are more likely to be taking some form of medication. • Some surveys suggest that over 70% of people over 50 are on (one)1 or more medications. • The impact of medications is often much more complex than we realise.

  42. Impact of Ageing Medications • Medications can effect: • Reflexes and reaction times. • Drowsiness. • Eyesight. • Muscle strength.

  43. Impact of Ageing Medications • It is important to understand the impact of all medications you may be taking – especially on your ability to drive.

  44. This all Sounds Very Bleak!

  45. But There is Hope!

  46. Some Facts and Tips Let’s examine some specific areas and work out some of the things we can do.

  47. Topics be Covered Which areas most interest you? Drivers & Passengers? Pedestrians? Medications? Alternative Transport? Motorised Scooters? Motor Cyclists? Cyclists? Discuss

  48. Topics Drivers & Passengers Pedestrians Medications Alternative Transport Options Motorised Scooters Motor Cyclists Cyclists Conclusion

  49. Topics Drivers & Passengers Pedestrians Medications Alternative Transport Options Motorised Scooters Motor Cyclists Cyclists Conclusion

  50. Older Drivers - Introduction • If you are 50, you have probably driven close to 500,000 Km’s.