logic models and organizational strategy and evaluation n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Logic Models and Organizational Strategy and Evaluation PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Logic Models and Organizational Strategy and Evaluation

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 34

Logic Models and Organizational Strategy and Evaluation - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 125 Views
  • Uploaded on

Logic Models and Organizational Strategy and Evaluation. By: Thomas J. Chapel, MA, MBA Chief Evaluation Officer CDC/NCCDPHP Tchapel@cdc.gov 404-488-6467. Disclaimer….

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Logic Models and Organizational Strategy and Evaluation' - dunne


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
logic models and organizational strategy and evaluation

Logic Models and Organizational Strategy and Evaluation

By:

Thomas J. Chapel, MA, MBA

Chief Evaluation Officer

CDC/NCCDPHP

Tchapel@cdc.gov

404-488-6467

disclaimer
Disclaimer…

The findings and conclusions in this presentation are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

objectives
Objectives
  • Why bother with logic models
  • Added-value of each component of logic model
  • Best use of logic models in framing planning and evaluation questions
take home mantras
Take-Home Mantras

It’s not about the model, it’s about “describing your program”

Models make the program logic clear, not true

Match the detail/format to the need

Simpler is generally better

4

presenting problem
Presenting Problem

Complex programs operating in complex environments

Accountability focused on long-term/distal outcomes

Joint efforts of many partners necessary to reach distal outcomes

Fragmentation of program planning, performance measurement, and evaluation

5

integrating processes to achieve continuous quality improvement
Integrating Processes to Achieve Continuous Quality Improvement
  • Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) cycle
    • Planning—What actions will best reach our goals and objectives.
    • Performance measurement— How are we doing?
    • Evaluation—Why are we doing well or poorly?

What do we do?

Why are we doing well or poorly?

How do we do it?

How are we doing?

you don t ever need a logic model but you always need a program description
You Don’t Ever Need a Logic Model, BUT, You Always Need a Program Description

Don’t jump into planning or evaluation without clarity on:

  • The big “need” your program is to address
  • The key target group(s) who need to take action
  • The kinds of actions they need to take (your intended outcomesor objectives)
  • Activitiesneeded to meet those outcomes
  • “Causal” relationshipsbetween activities and outcomes
logic models and program description
Logic Models and Program Description
  • Logic Models

Graphic depictions of the relationship between your program’s activities and its intended effects

step 2 describing the program complete logic model

Short-term Effects/ Outcomes

Intermediate Effects/ Outcomes

Long-term Effects/

Outcomes

Inputs

Activities

Outputs

Context

Assumptions

Step 2: Describing the Program:Complete Logic Model
slide10

Short-term Effects/ Outcomes

Intermediate Effects/ Outcomes

Long-term Effects/

Outcomes

Inputs

Activities

Outputs

Context

Assumptions

What the program and its staff actually do

Results of activities:Who/what will change?

finding activities and outcomes
Finding Activities and Outcomes

Actions/

Tactics

Plan

Objectives

Goals

ST or MT

Outcomes

LT

Outcomes

or Impacts

Activities

Eval

Outcome Measures

Impact Measures

Key Performance Indicators

Success Factors

Process Measures

Progress Measures

Impl. Measures

PM

lead poisoning the problem
Lead Poisoning: The Problem
  • Lead poisoning is a widespread environmental hazard facing young children, especially in older inner-city areas. Exposure lead has been linked to cognitive disruption and behavioral disorders, especially when exposure occurs early in life. The main sources of lead poisoning in children are paint and dust in older homes with lead-based paint. Lead poisoning effects can be ameliorated through medical interventions. But, ultimately, the source of lead in the environment must be contained or eliminated through renovation or removal of the lead-based paint by professionals. Short of that, families can reduce the bad effects on their children through intensive housekeeping practices and selected nutritional interventions…
lead poisoning the program
Lead Poisoning: The Program…

County X, with a suspected high number of lead-poisoned children, has received money from CDC to support a Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program. The county’s program aims to do outreach and identify children to screen, identify those whose initial and confirmatory screening results show elevated blood lead levels (EBLL) at actionable levels, assess the environments of the EBLL children for sources of lead, and case manage both their medical treatment and the correction of their environment. The program staff will also train families in selected housekeeping and nutritional practices that have been shown to reduce lead levels in homes and lead burden in children. While as a grantee the county can work to assure medical treatment and reduction of lead in the home environment, the grant cannot directly pay for medical treatment or for renovation/remediation of homes.

13

listing activities and outcomes lead poisoning
Listing Activities and OutcomesLead Poisoning

Activities

Outreach

Screening

Case management

Referral for medical tx

Identification of kids with elevated lead (EBLL)

Environmental assessment

Referral for env clean-up

Family training

Effects/Outcomes

Lead source identified

Families adopt in-home techniques

Providers treats EBLL kids

Housing Authority eliminates lead source

EBLL reduced

Developmental “slide” stopped

Q of L improved

14

slide15

Global Logic Model: Childhood Lead Poisoning Program

Early Activities

Later Activities

Early Outcomes

Later Outcomes

Then….

EBLL kids get medical treatment

Family performs in-home techniques

Lead source identified

Environment gets cleaned up

Lead source removed

And then…

EBLL reduced

Develop’l slide stopped

Quality of life improves

And we do…

Case mgmt of EBLL kids

Refer EBLL kids for medical treatment

Train family in in-home techniques

Assess environment of EBLL child

Refer environment for clean-up

If we do…

Outreach

Screening

ID of elevated kids

15

slide16

Lead Poisoning: “Causal” Roadmap

Activities

Outcomes

Outreach

Do Environment

Assessment

ID Source and

Refer for clean-up

Lead Source

Removed

Train

Families

Screening

ReducingEBLLs

ImprovedDevelopmentand Intelligence

Family performs

in-home techniques

Refer for

Medical Treatment

MedicalManagement

ID kids with

EBLL

MoreProductiveand/or QualityLives

Case

Management

slide19

Logic Model—Office of Workforce and Career Development

Inputs

Activities

Outcomes

Competent, sustainable, diverse workforce

Improved health outcomes

Conduct training

Do career leadership development

Evidence Base

Do Strategic workforce planning

…a miracle occurs…

slide20

Implicit Logic Model

Activities

Inputs

Outcomes

Workforce

is

Competent

Sustainable

Diverse

Improved health outcomes

Conduct training

Do career leadership development

Evidence Base

Do Strategic workforce planning

slide21

Short-term Effects/ Outcomes

Intermediate Effects/ Outcomes

Long-term Effects/

Outcomes

Inputs

Activities

Outputs

Context

Assumptions

Tangible products of activities

lead poisoning sample outputs
Pool (#) of eligible kids

Pool (#) of screened kids

Referrals (#) to medical treatment

Pool (#) of assessed homes

Referrals (#) for clean-up

Lead Poisoning: Sample Outputs
slide23

Lead Poisoning: “Causal” Roadmap

Activities

Outcomes

Outreach

Do Environment

Assessment

ID Source and

Refer for clean-up

Lead Source

Removed

Train

Families

Screening

ReducingEBLLs

ImprovedDevelopmentand Intelligence

Family performs

in-home techniques

Refer for

Medical Treatment

MedicalManagement

ID kids with

EBLL

MoreProductiveand/or QualityLives

Case

Management

23

lead poisoning upgraded outputs more than simple counts
Pool (#) of screened kids (meeting likely risk profile)

Pool (#) of eligible kids (with lead level >XXd/ul)

Referrals (#) to (qualified or willing) medical treatment providers

Pool (#) of assessed (“leaded”) homes

Referrals (#) for clean-up (to qualified or willing orgs)

Lead Poisoning: “Upgraded” Outputs: More than Simple Counts
slide25

Global Logic Model: Childhood Lead Poisoning Program

Early Activities

Outputs

Later Activities

Early Outcomes

Later Outcomes

(#) of eligible kids meeting risk profile

(#) screened kids with lead < threshold

(#) referrals to qualified medical tx

(#) of families completing training

(#) of “leaded” homes

(#) referrals to qualified clean-up

EBLL kids get medical treatment

Family performs in-home techniques

Lead source identified

Environ cleaned up

Lead source removed

Do case mgmt

Refer for medical tx

Train family in in-home techniques

Assess environ’t

Refer house for clean-up

EBLL reduced

Develop’l slide stopped

Quality of life improves

Outreach

Screening

ID of elevated kids

slide26

Short-term Effects/ Outcomes

Intermediate Effects/ Outcomes

Long-term Effects/

Outcomes

Inputs

Activities

Outputs

Context

Assumptions

Resource “platform” for the program

lead poisoning sample inputs
Funds

Trained staff

Legal authority to screen

Relationships with orgs for med treatment and environmental clean-up

Lead Poisoning: Sample Inputs
slide28

Lead Poisoning: “Causal” Roadmap

Inputs

Activities

Outcomes

Outreach

Do Environment

Assessment

Funds

Staff

R’ships

Legal

Authority

ID Source and

Refer for clean-up

Lead Source

Removed

ReducingEBLLs

ImprovedDevelopmentand Intelligence

Screening

Family performs

in-home techniques

Train

Families

MedicalManagement

ID kids with

EBLL

Refer for

Medical Treatment

MoreProductiveand/or QualityLives

Case

Management

slide29

Short-term Effects/ Outcomes

Intermediate Effects/ Outcomes

Long-term Effects/

Outcomes

Inputs

Activities

Outputs

Context

Assumptions

Moderators: Contextual factors that will facilitate or hinder (i.e. “moderate”) ability of activities to produce our outcomes

moderators lead poisoning
Moderators—Lead Poisoning
  • Political—“Hazard” politics
  • Economic— Health insurance
  • Technological— Availability of hand-held technology
slide31

Lead Poisoning: “Causal” Roadmap and Moderators

Activities

Outcomes

Outreach

Do Environment

Assessment

ID Source and

Refer for clean-up

Lead Source

Removed

Train

Families

Screening

ReducingEBLLs

ImprovedDevelopmentand Intelligence

Family performs

in-home techniques

Refer for

Medical Treatment

MedicalManagement

ID kids with

EBLL

MoreProductiveand/or QualityLives

“hazard politics”

Case

Management

insurance climate

technology

slide32
Note!

Logic Models make the program theory clear,

nottrue!

logic models and strategy and planning
Logic Models and Strategy and Planning
  • By Clarifying Sequence of Activities  Outcomes, Helps With…
    • Identifying/refining mission
    • Developing consensus on key intended outcomes—the “staked claim”
    • Enhances quality and clarity of BSC perspectives and objectives
helpful resources
Helpful Resources
  • NEW! Intro to Program Evaluation for PH Programs—A Self-Study Guide: http://www.cdc.gov/eval/whatsnew.htm
  • Logic Model Sites
    • Innovation Network: http://www.innonet.org/
    • Harvard Family Research Project: http://www.gse.harvard.edu/hfrp/
    • University of Wisconsin-Extension: http://www.uwex.edu/ces/lmcourse/
    • CDC/DASH:http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/evaluation/resources.htm#4
    • CDC/STD: http://www.cdc.gov/std/program/progeval/TOC-PGprogeval.htm
  • Texts
    • Kellogg Foundation Logic Model Development Guide: www.wkkf.org
    • W.K. Kellogg Foundation Evaluation Resources: http://www.wkkf.org/programming/overview.aspx?CID=281
    • Rogers et al. Program Theory in Evaluation. New Directions Series: Jossey-Bass, Fall 2000
    • Chen, H. Theory-Driven Evaluations. Sage. 1990