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Introduction to Neuropsychology. Introduction. Lecture Series: (a) Introduction; (b) Memory Visual Perception Motor Behaviour Emotion Executive Function. Introduction. ...lectures Language Lateralisation Current Issues/Debates Revision/Discussion Exam. Introduction.

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Introduction to Neuropsychology


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    1. Introduction to Neuropsychology

    2. Introduction Lecture Series: • (a) Introduction; (b)Memory • Visual Perception • Motor Behaviour • Emotion • Executive Function

    3. Introduction ...lectures • Language • Lateralisation • Current Issues/Debates • Revision/Discussion • Exam

    4. Introduction Presentations (30%) • 15min presentation (groups [3]) on a particular area of neuropsychology (e.g. memory) • An understanding of the behavioural deficits that result from the circumscribed brain damage • An appreciation for the inferences that can be drawn from the presented case(s) • An awareness of the advantages and limitations of the “lesion” approach in advancing our understanding of brain-behaviour relationships, within the context of the presented case(s).

    5. Introduction Exam (70%) • 1hr written exam answering 2 questions (related to areas covered in the lectures) • An understanding of the behavioural deficits that result from the circumscribed brain damage • An appreciation for the inferences that can be drawn from the presented case(s) • An awareness of the advantages and limitations of the “lesion” approach in advancing our understanding of brain-behaviour relationships, within the context of the presented case(s).

    6. Basic Anatomy

    7. Basic Anatomy

    8. Basic Anatomy

    9. Basic Anatomy

    10. Basic Anatomy

    11. Memory Patient H.M. (The Hippocampus)

    12. Hippocampus

    13. Hippocampus

    14. Patient H.M. (Scoville & Milner, 1957)

    15. Patient H.M. (Scoville & Milner, 1957) (Corkin et al., 1997)

    16. Patient H.M. (Corkin et al., 1997)

    17. Patient H.M. • Bilateral medial temporal-lobe excisions (5cm posterior) in 1953 (27yrs old) • At 19 months • Retrograde amnesia (3yrs) • Anterograde amnesia • Age*, date, address* • Verbal stimuli • Non-verbal stimuli • IQ = 104-112 • Good vocabulary/articulation • Visual perception • Abstract thinking* • Reasoning ability • No change in personality • Normal digit span (Scoville & Milner, 1957; Milner, Corkin & Teuber, 1968)

    18. Patient H.M.IQ vs. Memory (Corkin, 1984)

    19. Wechsler Memory Scale(WMS-IV)

    20. Patient H.M.Perception (Milner, Corkin & Teuber, 1968)

    21. Patient H.M.Executive function (Milner, Corkin & Teuber, 1968)

    22. Patient H.M.Short-term Memory (STM) (Wickelgren, 1968)

    23. Patient H.M.Long-term Memory (LTM) (Marlsen-Wilson & Teuber, 1975)

    24. Patient H.M.Non-verbal LTM (Milner, 1965)

    25. Patient K.F.Double Dissociation (STM) (Shallice & Warrington, 1969)

    26. Hippocampus: Lateralisation (Milner, 1965)

    27. Patient H.M.Non-verbal LTM

    28. Patient H.M. (Milner, 1965)

    29. Patient H.M.Procedural LTM (Milner, 1962; [Corkin, 1968])

    30. Patient N.A.Perception (Tueber, Milner & Vaughan, 1968)

    31. Patient N.A.Non-verbal LTM (Tueber, Milner & Vaughan, 1968)

    32. Patient N.A.Non-verbal LTM (Tueber, Milner & Vaughan, 1968)

    33. Patient N.A.Non-verbal LTM (Tueber, Milner & Vaughan, 1968)

    34. Patient N.A.Verbal LTM (Tueber, Milner & Vaughan, 1968)

    35. Patient N.A.Procedural LTM (Cohen & Squire, 1980)

    36. Patient R.B.Hippocampus: CA1 (Zola-Morgan, Squire & Amaral, 1980)

    37. Patient R.B.Hippocampus: CA1 (Zola-Morgan, Squire & Amaral, 1980)

    38. Patient R.B.Hippocampus: CA1 (Zola-Morgan, Squire & Amaral, 1980)

    39. Animal ModelsNeuroanatomy (Mishkin, 1978)

    40. Animal ModelsConsolidation (Zola-Morgan & Squire, 1990)

    41. Animal ModelsConsolidation (Kim & Fanselow, 1992)

    42. Animal ModelsSTM vs. LTM (Alvarez, Zola-Morgan & Squire, 1994)

    43. Architecture of Memory (Squire & Knowlton, 1995; Vargha-Khadem, 1997)

    44. The End

    45. Example Exam Questions • How have neuropsychological investigations revealed multiple memory systems? • How has H.M. informed the neuropsychology of memory