art chapters 10 18 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
ART Chapters 10-18 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
ART Chapters 10-18

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 96

ART Chapters 10-18 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 78 Views
  • Updated on

ART Chapters 10-18. Lauren Litchet APUSH Period 1. The Written Word. A print revolution began in 1826 The American Tract Society installed the country’s first steam-powered press Steam powered press produced 300,000 Bibles and 6 million religious tracts In 1810 there were 376 newspapers

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

ART Chapters 10-18


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. ARTChapters 10-18 Lauren Litchet APUSH Period 1

    2. The Written Word • A print revolution began in 1826 • The American Tract Society installed the country’s first steam-powered press • Steam powered press produced 300,000 Bibles and 6 million religious tracts • In 1810 there were 376 newspapers • In 1835 there were as many as 1,200 newspapers • Most newspapers were published by political parties and were openly partisan • Thorough the country, religious literature was the most widely read • A middle-class audience existed for literary magazines • Women especially read sentimental magazines and novels

    3. The Telegraph • Samuel F.B. Morse sent his first message from Washington to Baltimore in 1844 • Morse code was used to send messages across the country • The timeliness of information available vastly increased • The telegraph increased everyone’s sense of community

    4. American Artists • Thomas Cole • Came to America from England in 1818 • Found inspiration in the American landscape • Paintings reflect the influence of the British Romantic school of landscape painting • Founded the Hudson River school of American painting • Had a nationalistic style is a key focus in his school • Known for his scenes of New York State’s Catskill and Adirondack Mountains

    5. American Artists Continued • Western Painters • Realists = Karl Bodmer and George Catlin • Romantics = Albert Bierstadt and Thomas Moran • Drew on the Western Landscape and its peoples • Their art was a contribution to the American sense of the land and the nation’s identity • George Catlin • Driven by the need to document Indian life before it disappeared • Spent 8 years among tribes of the upper Missouri River • Toured the country from 1837 to 1851 in an unsuccessful attempt to arouse public indignation about the Western Indian nations

    6. American Artists Continued • John James Audubon • Etchings of American birds • George Caleb Bingham • Produced tidied-up scenes of real-life American workers • Record the way of American life • The inspiration of the painter’s most prevalent theme, the American wilderness, was endangered by the rapid western settlement

    7. Architecture in America • Neoclassical style were favored for public buildings • In the south many homes were mansions • Americans were in too much of a hurry to build for the future • Built balloon-frame structures = a basic frame of wooden studs fastened with crosspieces top and bottom • First used in Chicago in the 1830s • The four-room balloon-frame house became affordable for many families which was housing for the common man and his family

    8. Artisans in the South • A small number of slaves were skilled workers • Artisan tasks included: • Weavers • Carpenters • Seamstresses • Blacksmiths • Mechanics

    9. Urban Artisans in the North • Urban artisans kept long hours • Crafts often interrupted families activities and neighborliness • Formal apprenticeship was strictly for men • It was assumed that once women married they would learn a domestic skill or craft • Women who wanted to work often worked as seamstresses or as laundresses

    10. Art in the 1820’s • The Hudson River School emerged as a loosely organized group of painters, whose subjects depicted the natural settings of the American continent • art movement was reflective of America and influential to Americans • works were part of visual culture • Artists in the Hudson River School: • Thomas Cole • Thomas Doughty • Alvan Fisher • In 1822 John Rubens Smith produced the Juvenile Drawing Book • three volumes and sold for seventy-two dollars

    11. Art in the 1820’s Continued • William Bentley Fowle wrote An Introduction to Linear Drawing • first documented book for teaching art in the United States public schools • gave directions for drawing lines, angles, geometry, simple moldings, classical forms, and architecture • Fielding Lucas published Lucas’ Progressive Drawing Book • taught pencil drawing, landscape watercolor painting, and perspective • never adopted by public schools

    12. Art in the 1830’s • Wheaton College, becomes one of the first primarily liberal arts devoted schools • The Creation of Negatives • William Henry Fox Talbot discovered a way to use a negative to make duplicate positive prints without losing the image on the negative • The Latticed Window, is known to be the oldest negative • Photography • In 1839 Sir John Herschel coined the term ‘Photography’ and this is the year the photographic process became public

    13. Art in the 1840’s • Elizabeth Palmer Peabody • pioneer in art education • published papers about how art needed to be taught in school • in 1846 the Smithsonian Institute National Museum of American Art opens • holds the largest collection of American art in the world • John Gadsby Chapman published American Drawing Book • It was to be used in schools as well as home instruction

    14. Art in the 1840’s Continued • The Philadelphia School of Design for Women • established by Sarah Worthington Peter • the first and only art college for women in the United States • The school gave women a chance to learn both a trade to become financially independent, and gain an education and respect from her peers

    15. Art in the 1850’s • The stereoscope becomes popular in 1851 • Stereoscope - unites images that are seen differently by each eye into one image creating a three-dimensional scene that allows the viewer to experience depth • The stereoscope allows landscape photographers helping to equally represent a landscape from two different points of sight • New York's School of Design for Women • Established in 1852 • Focused on teaching technical drawing and designing paper and textiles for manufacturers • Van Gogh • Was born in 1853 • worked as an artist in the Post-Impressionist period

    16. Art in the 1850’s Continued • The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art • Founded in 1859 by Peter Cooper • The union was a college that was to prepare students for the professions of architecture, art and engineering • Realism • Started to appear in the 1850s • Realism’s purpose was to accurately depict and create artwork that was identical to that of the ordinary world • Realism was a faith based movement as well as an artistic movement • Realism focused on the emphasis of light, photography, construction and architecture

    17. Landscape Painting During the Civil War • Landscape painting was made popular during the Civil War era due to the Hudson River School • The Hudson River School Was said to be founded by Thomas Cole, an English painter, seeing that he sparked the Landscape movement within the United States • The majority of the Landscape painters within America were located in New York City • The Hudson River School’s artists were known to incorporate romanticism into their Landscape designs • Hudson River School painters typically painted landscapes such as the Adirondacks, Hudson River Valley, Catskills and the White Mountains within their paintings • The Hudson River School slowly evolved to painting western landscapes • Most landscape scenes produced by the Hudson River School were composite scenes – paintings that were a compilation of real and imaginary places • Artists within the Hudson River School’s Landscape Movement: • Asher B. Durand • Thomas Doughty • Thomas Cole • Thomas Moran

    18. Impressionism During the Civil War • Paintings sought to convey the fleeting effects of sunlight and atmosphere • Artists wanted to create a heightened sense of reality in their work • Artists painted landscapes and scenes of leisure • Artists attempted to capture the overall sense of light • Artists attempted to replicate French Impressionism while blending in their own interpretation of it • American Impressionists tended to retain more structure and realism in their work as opposed to French artists • American impressionists hoped to recreate the same spirit of camaraderie found in art colonies abroad

    19. Impressionism During the Civil War Continued • Notable American Impressionists • Frank Weston Benson • J. Ottis Adams • Mary Cassatt • William Merritt Chase • Childe Hassam • J. Alden Weir

    20. Realism During the Civil War • Visual art style that depicts the actuality of what the eyes can see • Realist artists tend to paint situations and dilemmas that discard anything extra • Realism artists painted scenes that depicted a contemporary view of what was happening in the world around them • Artists attempted to define what was real through their artwork

    21. Realism During the Civil War Continued • Notable Realism artists • Thomas Eakins • Painted The Champion Single Sculling • John Singer Sargent • Painted Morning Walk • James McNeill Whistler • Painted Arrangement in Grey and Black: The Artist’s Mother • Winslow Homer • Painted Sunlight on the Coast

    22. Photography During the Civil War • Matthew M. Brady Was granted permission from Abraham Lincoln to document the war with photographs • Bradley financed photographers to document primarily the Union’s military • Alexander Gardner was the most prominent photographer that Brady had hired to photograph the war • It was too dangerous to take photographs on the battlefield, so the photographers took photos of the soldiers at camp, preparing for battle and the bloody aftermath of each battle

    23. Photography During the Civil War Continued • Photographers used wet plate negatives to develop their photos • When a photographer was ready to take a picture they had to prepare a sheet of glass that was coated with collodion and silver nitrate • This glass plate was then placed in front of the camera and acted as the film • Each glass plate produced one photograph • Once the photograph was captured, the glass plate negative was then developed in a darkroom tent • Due to the complexity of taking photographs, photographers were limited in taking battle specific photographs

    24. Photography During the Civil War Continued • At the end of the war two books were published depicting the war with photographs • Gardner's Photographic Sketch Book of the War (1865–66) • This book was composed of over 100 photographs from the war along with numerous sketches from the war • Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign (1866) • This book is composed of photographs with captions depicting the Civil War

    25. Key Terms • Religious tracts – small pamphlets used for religious and political purposes • Partisan – Committed member of a political party • Telegraph – a device for transmitting and receiving messages over long distances • Neo-Classical Style – manifested both in its details as a reaction against the Rococo style of naturalistic ornament, and in its architectural formulas as an outgrowth of some classicizing features of Late Baroque • Seamstress – a woman who makes her living through sewing

    26. Key Terms Continued • Perspective - a technique of depicting volumes and spatial relationships on a flat surface • Stereoscope - unites images that are seen differently by each eye into one image creating a three-dimensional scene that allows the viewer to experience depth • Post-Impressionist - A school of painting in France in the late 19th century that rejected the objective naturalism of impressionism and used form and color in more personally expressive ways • Realism – artwork whose purpose was to accurately depict and create artwork that was identical to that of the ordinary world • Progressive - Proceeding in steps; continuing steadily by increments

    27. Key Terms Continued • Impressionism – style of painting originally developed in France that was characterized by strokes of unmixed colors to give the impression of reflective light • Realism – an art movement aimed at representing the real world in a visually truthful way • Collodion – flammable solution of pyroxylin that is used to produce wet plate negatives • Camaraderie – mutual trust and friendship among people who spend a lot of time together • Contemporary views – a modern or sophisticated approach to a situation

    28. Important People • Thomas Cole • Came to America from England in 1818 • Found inspiration in the American landscape • Paintings reflect the influence of the British Romantic school of landscape painting • Founded the Hudson River school of American painting • Had a nationalistic style is a key focus in his school • Known for his scenes of New York State’s Catskill and Adirondack Mountains • George Catlin • Driven by the need to document Indian life before it disappeared • Spent 8 years among tribes of the upper Missouri River • Toured the country from 1837 to 1851 in an unsuccessful attempt to arouse public indignation about the Western Indian nations

    29. Important People Continued William Henry Fox Talbot • Discovered a way to use a negative to make duplicate positive prints without losing the image on the negative • The Latticed Window, is known to be the oldest negative Elizabeth Palmer Peabody • Pioneer in art education in the 1840’s • Published papers about how art needed to be taught in school

    30. Important People Continued • Thomas Cole • English-born American artist • Said to be the founder of the Hudson River School • Artistic movement that sparked interest in landscape painting in the 19th century • Known for his detailed paintings of American landscapes and the American wilderness • Featured themes of naturalism and romanticism • Mary Cassatt • Was an American painter and printmaker • Spent most of her adult life in France painting • Was an artist of the impressionist movement • Painted portraits of women and children • Paintings focused on the bond between mothers and their children

    31. 1 • When did the printing revolution begin? a. 1826 b. 1829 c. 1828 d. 1830

    32. Answer A

    33. 2 • How many bibles were produced from the steam powered press? a. 500,000 b. 400,000 c. 300,000 d. 200,000

    34. Answer C

    35. 3 • Men typically read sentimental magazine and novels. a. True b. False

    36. Answer B

    37. 4 • Morse sent his first message from: a. Boston to New York City b. Philadelphia to Washington c. Baltimore to Boston d. Washington to Baltimore

    38. Answer D

    39. 5 • Thomas Cole came to America from a. France b. England c. Germany d. Austria

    40. Answer B

    41. 6 • Which painter wanted to document Indian life? a. Bingham b. Moran c. Bodmer d. Catlin

    42. Answer D

    43. 7 • Audubon made etchings of American birds. a. True b. False

    44. Answer A

    45. 8 • The first balloon-frame structures were built in a. Washington b. Philadelphia c. Chicago d. Savannah

    46. Answer C

    47. 9 • Which of the following was NOT an artisan task in the south? a. Weavers b. Seamstresses c. Blacksmith d. Cotton picker

    48. Answer D

    49. 10 • In the north, women who wanted to work were unable to because of the restrictions placed on them. a. True b. False

    50. Answer B