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What do you think of? PowerPoint Presentation
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What do you think of?

What do you think of?

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What do you think of?

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  1. What do you think of?

  2. Symbiosis, or the living together of different organisms, allows some species to live in otherwise hostile environments, so it can be a powerful mechanism of evolutionary change. And in every such case, the special role of certain inorganic elements is the key to the symbiosis.

  3. Does it matter what we call it? Are these really different? Biological Inorganic Chemistry Inorganic Biochemistry Bioinorganic Chemistry Metals in Biology

  4. OK, so in addition to: Biological Inorganic Chemistry Inorganic Biochemistry Metals in Biology Other names for similar science are: Metals in Medicine Biogeochemistry Environmental Bioinorganic Chemistry Geological Bioinorganic Chemistry Biological Geochemistry… …. You get the idea.

  5. Bio inorganic Chemistry A contradiction in terms?

  6. 1. Not having the structure or organization of living bodies 2. Not characterized by vital processes 3. Not fundamental or related; extraneous 4. Pertaining to compounds that are not hydrocarbons 5. Mineral 1. (Gr. “bios” ‘life, course or way of living’). In compounds formed in Greek itself, as biography; and in modern scientific words in which bio- is extended to mean ‘organic life.’ 2. A prefix meaning “life” Bio inorganic Chemistry

  7. Bulk elements to form structure

  8. Bulk elements to form structure

  9. Bulk elements to form structure Essential elements for special functions

  10. Bulk elements to form structure Essential elements for special functions Essential elements for certain species

  11. Bulk elements to form structure Essential elements for special functions Essential elements for certain species Elements used in medicine as therapeutics or diagnostics

  12. OK, then why are only 3 metals shown?

  13. a guess: it reflects history. The first book Inorganic Biochemistry (1973) mainly concerned these metals: Fe: hemes and heme enzymes heme= red Cu in copper oxidases or the copper cyanin proteins: cerulocyanincyanin from from Greek kuaneos 'dark blue' plastocyaninplasto: in chloroplasts hemocyaninhemo: stellacyaninstella: star (shape) azurinazure = bright blue from medieval Latin azzurum, azolum Zn in alkaline phosphatases Mo in molybdoenzymes: key in nitrogen cycle

  14. Copper Oxidases fascinate with their blue colors An engineered azurinvariant that binds two Cu atoms. A short Cu-Cu distance causes intense purple color. A blue copper protein called azurin, contains one copper atom Plastocyanin crystals

  15. Who is in this field: Synthetic Inorganic Chemists Synthetic Organic Chemists Biochemists Protein crystallographers Physical Chemists Spectroscopists Biologists Botanists Geneticists Geologists MDs Environmental scientists

  16. The format of this course: Lots of reading (text) Lots of discussion Little lecturing Lots of participation What is graded: Occasional worksheets One mid-term One-final One or more short presentations … and all your participation Get to know the website The course is also fairly paperless

  17. My goals for you: become familiar with the breadth of bioinorganic chemistry (2) develop sufficient background to read the literature or to research a particular topic in bioinorganic chemistry (3) know how the characteristics of metals influence their roles in biology