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Third Sector Organization Types

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  1. Third Sector Organization Types • Not-For-Profits (Volunteer Organizations) • Trade, Technical, Professional Assoc. • Academia • Foundations • Consortiums/Councils • Central U.S. Earthquake Consortium • New England States E-quake Consortium • Western States Seismic Policy Council

  2. Foundation Activity Examples • Almanson FD(Low-income Home Repair,Northridge) • American Express FDTN (Facilities Repair,Iniki) • CA Community FD (Homeless Aid, Facility Repair, Northridge) • Hawaii Community (Facility Repair, Iniki) • Knight Foundation (Recovery Planning, Andrew) • McKnight FD (Recovery Assistance, MS Floods) • Ryder System Charitable FD (Low-Income Home Repair, Andrew)

  3. Volunteer Organizations (NFP) Any chartered or otherwise duly recognized tax-exempt local, State, or national organization or group that has provided or may provide needed services to the States, local governments, or individuals in coping with emergencies and disasters free of charge, or for a minimal cost which is required to defray the cost of services provided. (FEMA/EMI 1998b, 1-2)

  4. Federal Legislation • “In providing relief and assistance under this Act, the President may utilize, with their consent, the personnel and facilities of the American National Red Cross, the Salvation Army, the Mennonite Disaster Service, and other relief or disaster assistance organizations, in the distribution of medicine, food, supplies, or other items, and in the restoration, rehabilitation, or reconstruction of community services, housing and essential facilities, whenever the President finds that utilization is necessary

  5. NOVAD Attributes • Communication • Cooperation • Coordination • Education • Leadership Development • Mitigation • Outreach

  6. Examples of National Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster • The American National Red Cross • Faith-Based Organizations • American Radio Relay League/REACT • National Organization for Victim Assist. • Northwest Medical Teams International • Phoenix Society for Burn Victims • Points of Light Foundation

  7. Unmet Needs Govt./Citizen Link Capacity, Coalition & Commitment Building Issue Advocacy and Legitimization Leadership Policy Formulation Resource Mobilization Technical Assistance Role ofThird Sector Organizations

  8. Advantages of Voluntary Organizations • Frequently a First Responder • Generally Trusted by the Public • Involved in All Four Phases • Do Mitigation Education/Advocacy • Conduct Community Disaster Education • Provide Disaster Mass Care • Work for Short & Long-Term Recovery • Have Local Knowledge and Contacts

  9. Advantages (continued) • Unique Skills of Volunteers • Diverse Membership • Good Stewards of Resources/Donations • Work Confidentially • Embody Community Values • Unmet Needs • Flexible, Innovative, Resourceful

  10. Disadvantages & Problem Areas • Cultural Insensitivity • Appearance of Being Rule-Bound • Insufficient Disaster Training • Inappropriate Assignments • Duplication of Services • Competition • Media Attention • Fund Raising

  11. Mitigation Activity Examples • Supporting Mitigation Legislation at All Levels of Government • Retrofitting Earthquake-Risk Low-Income Housing • Incorporating Structural Mitigation in Post-Disaster Residential Rebuilding • Rebuilding Outside of Flood Plains • Funding Low-Income Elevation Projects

  12. Typical Preparedness Activities of Voluntary Organizations • Emergency Operations Planning • Training Disaster Responders • Disaster Exercise Participation • Community Disaster Education

  13. Disaster Response Examples • First Aid and Blood Provision • Damage Assessment • Search and Rescue • Mass Feeding • Sheltering Operations • Communications and Transportation • Crisis Counseling & Victim Inquiries • Child Care • Emergency Supplies (Clothing, Bedding, Health and Sanitation) • Warehousing Operations

  14. Disaster Relief Examples • Debris Removal • Clean-Up Operations • Construction of Temporary Housing • Repair and Restoration Operations • Furniture, Appliances, Occupational Tools • Financial Grants • Counseling

  15. From 1905American National Red Cross Congressional Charter • The (ARC) is chartered to “carry on a system of national and international relief in time of peace and apply the same in mitigating the sufferings caused by pestilence, famine, fire, floods, and other great national calamities, and to devise and carry on measures for preventing the same.”

  16. American National Red Cross • Largest Hazards-Related Non-Profit • Approximately 2,500 Active Chapters • Volunteers 85% of Disaster Relief Force • Annual Disaster Responses -- 60,000 • Trend Increasing • 1993-1998 • 322,328 Disaster Event Responses • 571,048 People Sheltered and Fed • 623,190 Families Financial Assistance

  17. ARC Disaster Expenditures (1994-1998) • 1994 $220.9 Million • 1995 $233.3 Million • 1996 $216.5 Million • 1997 $214.5 Million • 1998 $192.6 Million

  18. Lutheran Disaster Response • Approximately 6,000 Volunteers & Staff • Focus on Marginalized & Unmet Needs • Response, Recovery, Preparedness • Provides Materials and Supplies • Rents Warehouse Space--Donated Goods • Leases Trucks for Supply Delivery • Disaster Clean-Up • Housing Repair and Rebuilding • Spiritual Care and Counseling

  19. The Salvation Army • Galveston, Texas--Disaster Beginnings • Focus on Response and Recovery • Spiritual Ministry and Counseling • Victim Identification and Registration • Mobile and Congregate Feeding • Financial Assistance • Shelter Operations • Donated Goods • Reconstruction

  20. Seventh-Day Adventist Disaster Response • 2,200 Local Units Nationwide • Response Focus: • Emergency Distribution, Relief Supplies • Warehouse Operations • Clearinghouse for Donated Goods • Door-to-Door Visitation • Disaster Child Care