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Equalizing the Playing Field:. Formative and Summative Assessments That Address the Needs of ALL Learners Specialized Educators Community of Practice - June 2014. Objective.

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equalizing the playing field

Equalizing the Playing Field:

Formative and Summative Assessments

That Address the Needs of ALL Learners

Specialized Educators Community of Practice - June 2014

objective
Objective

Participants will demonstrate an understanding of the essential elements of formative and summative assessments and their implications for students with disabilities.

formative assessment
Formative Assessment

Take a moment to reflect:

What formative assessments do you currently use?

formative summative assessment
Formative/Summative Assessment

Formative

Summative

Measures learning

Periodic snapshots of learning

Focused on learning products

Teacher Directed

Standard-unchanging measure of what a student has achieved

Teachers use results to make success or failure decisions

  • Improves teaching and learning
  • Occurs while learning is in progress
  • Focused on learner progress
  • Collaborative communication among teachers and students
  • Ongoing process based on student need
  • Evidence gathered to adjust for continuous improvement
udl assessment
UDL & Assessment
  • UDL Curriculum Self Check
    • http://udlselfcheck.cast.org
  • Perspectives on UDL and Assessment an Interview with Robert Mislevy
    • http://www.udlcenter.org/resource_library/articles/mislevy
slide6

The Learner

Formative Assessment

InstructionalActivities

Daily Learning Objectives

slide7

http://schoolleader.typepad.com/school-leader/2012/01/popham-on-formative-vs-summative-assessment.htmlhttp://schoolleader.typepad.com/school-leader/2012/01/popham-on-formative-vs-summative-assessment.html

planning for ongoing assessment

Strategy Alert: Unpack Standards; Chunk Information; Criteria for Evaluation

Planning for Ongoing Assessment

Four Key Steps

  • Identify and Share Learning Goals
  • Gather Evidence of Understanding
  • Adjust Instruction
  • Give Feedback to Students

Source: Betty Hollas,

2010 NMSA Conference

planning for ongoing assessment1
Planning for Ongoing Assessment

Strategy Alert: Anticipation Guide; Exit Card; Thumbs Up or 1-2-3; Cloze Activity, Journaling, Likert Scales

Four Key Steps

  • Identify and Share Learning Goals
  • Gather Evidence of Understanding
  • Adjust Instruction
  • Give Feedback to Students

Source: Betty Hollas,

2010 NMSA Conference

planning for ongoing assessment2
Planning for Ongoing Assessment

Four Key Steps

  • Identify and Share Learning Goals
  • Gather Evidence of Understanding
  • Adjust Instruction
  • Give Feedback to Students

Strategy Alert: Re-teach; Engage; Questioning; Tiered Instruction

Source: Betty Hollas,

2010 NMSA Conference

planning for ongoing assessment3
Planning for Ongoing Assessment

Four Key Steps

  • Identify and Share Learning Goals
  • Gather Evidence of Understanding
  • Adjust Instruction
  • Give Feedback to Students

Strategy Alert: Acknowledgment;

Direction for Change; Next Steps

Source: Betty Hollas,

2010 NMSA Conference

the main goal
THE MAIN GOAL

“The main goal of classroom testing and assessment is to obtain valid, reliable, and useful information concerning student achievement.”

LINN & MILLER

stiggins view on assessment
Stiggins’ View on Assessment

Assessment is no longer just a sorting mechanism (successful from unsuccessful; winners and losers). It must address the needs of each and every student.

students
Students:

MSDE: Division for Leadership Development

Maryland Principals’ Academy Follow-Up

PA #

teachers
Teachers:

MSDE: Division for Leadership Development

Maryland Principals’ Academy Follow-Up

PA #

slide16

S.I.

Assessment

Instruction

Curriculum

Differentiated Instruction

Universal Design for Learning

goals for classroom teachers
GOALS FOR CLASSROOM TEACHERS

Teachers can create classrooms that are information rich by providing multiple and targeted opportunities for students to show what they know, providing useful feedback to both the teacher and the students.

food for thought
FOOD FOR THOUGHT

The most powerful single modification that enhances achievement is

FEEDBACK!

J. H.HATTIE (1992), “MEASURING THE EFFECTS OF SCHOOLING” AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF EDUCATION.

grant wiggins on feedback
GRANT WIGGINS ON FEEDBACK

“Feedback is different from advice or guidance. It is also different from praise or blame. Feedback is information.

‘Good job!’ is not feedback, it is praise. Praise isn’t information- it is affirmation.”

good feedback is
TIMELY

EXPERT

CONSISTENT

DESCRIPTIVE

HONEST

ON-GOING

ACCURATE

USER-FRIENDLY

SPECIFIC

CONSTRUCTIVE

GOOD FEEDBACK IS:
good feedback
GOOD FEEDBACK
  • Provides opportunities to try the activity again
  • Includes what learners didn’t do in addition to what they did do
  • Uses a shared vocabulary that all can understand
  • Relies on mutual trust, the belief that the teacher and students are partners in the feedback process
changes in the landscape
CHANGES IN THE LANDSCAPE

There has recently been a shift in focus from assessment OF learning to assessment FOR learning.

assessment for learning
ASSESSMENTFORLEARNING

Assessment that occurs throughout the learning process that is designed to make each students’ understanding visible so that teachers can decide what they can do to help students progress.

types of assessment for learning
INFORMAL

formative assessment can take place during any teacher-student interaction

Exit ticket

4 corners

Muddiest point

FORMAL

formative assessment includes planned activities designed to provide evidence about student learning.

Homework

Quiz

Rough draft

TYPES OF ASSESSMENTFORLEARNING
assessment of learning
ASSESSMENTOFLEARNING
  • When we use assessment at the conclusion of a learning activity, we are using assessment OF learning.
what s the difference
WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE

Assessment for learning is any assessment

for which the first priority is to serve the purpose of

promoting students’ learning

FEEDBACK ALONE MAKES THE GREATEST

IMPACT ON STUDENT GRADES

words of wisdom
WORDS OF WISDOM

“You cannot fatten the cattle by weighing them more. You have to FEED them.” Larry Lezotte

parcc assessment professional development module
PARCC Assessment Professional Development Module
  • Module #1: PARCC Common Assessments Overview
  • Module #2: Introduction to the PARCC Mid-Year

Assessment

  • Module #3: Introduction to the PARCC Diagnostic

Assessment

  • Module #4: Introduction to the PARCC Speaking and Listening

Assessment

  • Module #5: PARCC Accessibility System
module 5 parcc accessibility system
Module 5: PARCC Accessibility System

This module will provide educators with the following information on

the Mid-Year, Performance-Based, and End-of-Year Assessments:

  • Accessibility features embedded into the delivery platform made available to all students;
  • Accommodations embedded into the delivery platform made available to students with disabilities;
module 5 parcc accessibility system1
Module 5: PARCC Accessibility System

This module will provide educators with the following information on

the Mid-Year, Performance-Based, and End-of-Year Assessments:

  • Accommodations embedded into the delivery platform made available to English learners; and
  • Resource guide that highlights where to find information on administrative guidance, laws, alternate assessments, technology support, and communications resources.
parcc comprehensive accessibility policies
PARCC Comprehensive Accessibility Policies

http://www.parcconline.org/parcc-accessibility-features-and-accommodations-manual

embedded supports
Embedded Supports
  • Tool, support, scaffold, or preference that is built into the assessment system that can be activated by any student, at his or her own discretion.
  • Universal Design features expected to benefit a diverse array of students and are available to all students.
  • Provided onscreen, stored in a toolbar, or are accessible through a menu or control panel, as needed.
  • During the assessment, students can choose which embedded supports they need for specific items. Examples include: audio amplification, highlighting, pop-up glossary, etc.
accessibility features
Availableto all students (i.e., not limited to students with IEPs, 504 plans, or ELs), but will be selected and “turned on” by a school-based educator prior to the assessment, based on each student’s Personal Needs Profile (PNP).

Based on each student’s individual needs, a PNP is created for the student to ensure that he or she receives appropriate access without the distraction of other tools and features that are not required by the student.

Although a school-based educator will enable specific accessibility features for students, the student will decide whether or not to use the feature. Accessibility features will be readily available on the computer-delivered testing platform.

Accessibility Features
slide37

Proposed

Accommodations for

Students with Disabilities (SWD)

www.parcconline.org

assistive technology
Assistive Technology
  • Some students with disabilities (with IEPs or 504 plans) may need to bring assistive technology to equitably access the PARCC Field Test.
  • For current guidance on assistive technology for the PARCC Field Test, please refer to the posted guidelines on PARCConline.org.
text to speech monitoring phase 1
Text-to-Speech Monitoring Phase 1
  • State baseline of the appropriate selection of the Text-to-Speech or Human Read-Aloudfor the ELA/Literacy online or paper-based PARCC Assessments, including items, response options, and passages.
  • Desk audit
  • No fault year
  • The results will be provided to local school systems to use as guidance to develop systemic and/or school based professional development to ensure the appropriate selection of the text to speech or human reader accommodation.
text to speech monitoring phase 11
Text-to-Speech Monitoring Phase 1

Monitoring Sample

  • A random sampling (20%) of students with disabilities

from selected local school systems who received the

text to speech, or human reader accommodation during

the PARCC field test will be selected to have their

Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) monitored for

the appropriate documentation of this accommodation

as outlined in the PARCC guidance.

  • The random sampling will be gathered by the Division of

Curriculum, Assessment and Accountability.

parcc resources for the field test and beyond
PARCC Resources: For the Field Test and Beyond

TBR

  • The guide contains links to a variety of resources about the PARCC assessments and 2014 PARCC Field Test.
  • The resources listed here are organized by audience and include resources relevant to All Audiences, those with specific information for Teachers, and resources developed to inform Parents.
  • Refer to PARCC Resources for the Field Test and Beyond document.

www.parcconline.org

maryland s community of practice
Maryland’s Community of Practice
  • Regional Community of Practice (CoP) Teams
    • Six Regional CoP
  • Implement Model Curricula; provide feedback prior to the assessment implementation for refinement
  • Assist with providing professional development to support teachers
maryland community of practice teams
Maryland Community of Practice Teams
  • Northern*
    • Baltimore City
    • Baltimore County
    • Harford
  • Central*
    • Anne Arundel
    • Howard
    • Montgomery
    • Prince George’s
  • Upper Eastern Shore*
    • Caroline
    • Cecil
    • Kent
    • Queen Anne’s
    • Talbot
  • Lower Eastern Shore
    • Dorchester
    • Somerset
    • Wicomico
    • Worcester
  • Western*
    • Allegany
    • Carroll
    • Frederick
    • Garrett
    • Washington
  • Southern*
    • Calvert
    • Charles
    • St. Mary’s
slide50

Community of Practice Teams

  • Alt-MSA Facilitators will Co-Chair a Region
  • Up to 23CoP Team Members
      • Administrators, Special Educators, General Educators and Related Service Providers
    • Speech Pathologist
    • Assistive Technology Specialist
    • OT, PT specialists
    • Teacher of Visually Impaired and Deaf/Hard of Hearing
    • Content Specialist – Reading/ELA, Mathematics
    • Regular and Special Education Teacher
    • Autism Specialist
    • Principal/AP – Comprehensive School and Special School
    • Non-public School Representative
overview training on ncsc mathematics materials
Overview Training on NCSC Mathematics Materials
  • When: Monday, June 9, 2014 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
  • Who: Alt-MSA Facilitators and Mathematics Content Specialists from the Community of Practice (CoP) Teams
  • What: Overview of NCSC Curriculum and Instructional Materials (focus on mathematics only)
    • Understanding the Schema and Core Content Connectors
    • Content Modules for Mathematics
    • Curriculum Resource Guides
    • Instructional Resource Guide
    • Universal Design Unit Lessons
    • MASSI: Math Activities with Scripted Systematic Instruction
provide daily appropriate and individualized accommodations
Provide Daily, Appropriate, and Individualized Accommodations
  • Accommodations are thoughtful, agreed-upon changes in practices and procedures that enable students to access grade-level content standards.
  • Accommodations planning should begin with instruction.
  • Accommodations are intended to produce valid measures of what a student knows and is able to do.
    • The classroom should be seen as a place to try out accommodations to see what works.
    • Accommodations for instruction and assessment are integrally intertwined.
    • Classroom data is collected to determine if accommodations are working.
  • Typically, accommodation use does not begin and end in school. Students who use accommodations will generally also need them at home, in the community, and as they get older, in postsecondary education and at work.
slide55

https://wiki.ncscpartners.org/index.php/Perimeter,_Area_and_Volume_Content_Modulehttps://wiki.ncscpartners.org/index.php/Perimeter,_Area_and_Volume_Content_Module

contacts division of special education early intervention services
Contacts: Division of Special Education/ Early Intervention Services
  • Paul Dunford, Branch Chief

Programmatic Support and Technical Assistance pdunford@msde.state.md.us

  • Marsye Kaplan, Section Chief mkaplan@msde.state.md.us
  • Karla Marty, Section Chief kmarty@msde.state.md.us
  • Fran Sorin, Coordinator of Professional Learning

fsorin@msde.state.md.us