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Our Charge and Challenge:. A core premise of Strive: “Why has Strive made progress when so many other efforts have failed? It is because a core group of community leaders decided to abandon their individual agendas in favor of a collective approach to improve student achievement.”

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our charge and challenge
Our Charge and Challenge:

A core premise of Strive:

“Why has Strive made progress when so many other efforts have failed? It is because a core group of community leaders decided to abandon their individual agendas in favor of a collective approach to improve student achievement.”

-- John Kania & Mark Kramer, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2011

Three Critical Questions:

  • Do we believe a different level and type of collective action would help to significantly increase and accelerate the closing of achievement gaps between white students and students of color in the Twin Cities?
  • If we agree that more and more effective collective action is needed, do we also agree that the Strive model or a variation of it would help the Twin Cities act collectively more effectively?
  • If we agree that the Strive model would facilitate effective collective action in the Twin Cities, how should it be implemented here?
slide2

Our Process

Strive Working Group

Ask and answer the hard questions in order to make a recommendation on whether the Strive model should be launched in the Twin Cities

  • Clarify and endorse the charge to the working group
  • Review the working group recommendation and decide if the effort should move from the investigation phase to the planning phase
  • Engage key stakeholders that have not yet participated in the process

Critical Decision Makers

Senior Leaders:

  • Minneapolis Public Schools
  • Minnesota Minority Education Partnership
  • St. Paul Public Schools
  • St. Paul Foundation
  • Target Corporation
  • University of Minnesota
  • Bush Foundation
  • City of Minneapolis
  • City of St Paul
  • General Mills
  • Greater Twin Cities United Way
  • Itasca Project
  • Minneapolis Foundation
slide3

Agenda

  • Introductions 30 min.
  • Working Group Approach 15 min.
  • Cradle to Career Continuum 10 min.
  • Break 10 min
  • Success Indicators
    • Break Out 60 min.
    • Report Back 40 min
  • Next Steps 10 min
slide4

Introductions

  • Name
  • Organization
  • A person (non-family member) from your youth who significantly influenced your success.
slide7

Meeting Ground Rules

  • Speak up to share the special insights that you bring to the working group
  • Respect everyone’s ideas. There really are no right or wrong answers.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask the hard questions and raise difficult points
  • Be concise and on topic to keep us moving along the path to a decision. – Avoid War Stories
  • Be patient in learning to see the achievement gap from a Six Sigma perspective of outcomes and factors.
  • Remember that we are all neutral evaluators working on behalf of thousands of children who are destined to difficult lives.
  • No technology usage while we are in session
slide8

Leveraging the Six Sigma Methodology

Define Success

Determine How Success is Measured

D M A I C

Analyze the Factors that Drive Success and Understand Current Capability

Decide the Course of Action for improvement

Develop Mechanisms to Sustain Improvements

slide9

Meeting 1

How Do You Define & Measure Success?

PRE-K

ELEM.

SCHOOL

MIDDLE

SCHOOL

HIGH

SCHOOL

POST

SECONDARY

CAREER

CRADLE

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

slide10

Meeting 2

What are the most important Factors for Success?

PRE-K

ELEM.

SCHOOL

MIDDLE

SCHOOL

HIGH

SCHOOL

POST

SECONDARY

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

EVIDENCE BASED

Factor

ACTIONABLE

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

slide11

Meeting 4

How well are factors being addressed in the TC today?

PRE-K

ELEM.

SCHOOL

MIDDLE

SCHOOL

HIGH

SCHOOL

POST

SECONDARY

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Success

Indicator

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Factor

Local Organization Impact

Local Organization Impact

Local Organization Impact

Local Organization Impact

Which high priority factors are being addressed with which children in the Twin Cities and what is the evidence of impact?

Local Organization Impact

Local Organization Impact

Local Organization Impact

Local Organization Impact

Local Organization Impact

Local Organization Impact

slide12

Meeting 5

The Decision

  • Will the Strive model eliminate the achievement gap by systemically ensuring that the most important factors to the success of students of color in the Twin Cities are addressed?
  • Are there the commitment, shared vision of success and resources (human and financial) within the education, business, and civic sectors to
      • Build a collaborative cradle to career network of Twin Cities organizations
      • Develop a comprehensive data system to support data-based decisions for student success
      • Change organizational priorities and align financial resources to what the data indicate is working?
slide13

Meeting 3

A Close Look at

the Strive Model.

Pat Brown

Director of Systems Innovation

Meeting 6

Preparation of Report on

Findings with Recommendations for Next Steps

slide14

General Information

  • Preread materials for Meeting 1-5 will be posted on

http://www.collegeready.umn.edu/resources/strive.html

  • Notes from each meeting will also be posted on http://www.collegeready.umn.edu/resources/strive.html

within 3 business days of the meeting. It is critically important to read the notes from meetings that you miss

  • Summary information on the current efforts of Twin Cities organizations (based on the factors identified in meeting 2) will be provided in meeting 4.
  • Minneapolis & St. Paul students will be the focus of our analysis recognizing that the achievement gap extends beyond these urban centers.
slide16

PROMISE NEIGHBORHOODS

Holistic Approach to Student Success

From 100 Blocks in Harlem to Across the Nation

Abyssinian Development Corporation (New York City, NY)

Amherst H. Wilder Foundation (Saint Paul, MN)

Athens-Clarke County Family Connection (Athens Clarke County, GA)

Berea College (Clay, Jackson, and Owsley Counties, KY)

Boys and Girls Club of the Northern Cheyenne Nation (Northern Cheyenne Reservation, MT)

California State University East Bay Foundation, Inc. (Hayward, CA)

Cesar Chavez Public Policy Charter High School (Washington, D.C.)

Community Day Care Center of Lawrence (Lawrence, MA)

Delta Health Alliance, Inc. (Indianola, MS)

Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative (Boston, MA)

The Guidance Center, (River Rouge, MI)

Lutheran Family Health Centers / Lutheran Medical Center (Brooklyn, NY)

Morehouse School of Medicine, Inc. (Atlanta, GA)

Neighborhood Centers, Inc. (Houston, TX)

Proyecto Pastoral at Dolores Mission (Los Angeles, CA)

United Way of Central Massachusetts (Worcester, MA)

United Way of San Antonio & Bexar County — Partners for Community Change (San Antonio, TX)

University of Arkansas at Little Rock (Little Rock, AK)

Universal Community Homes (Philadelphia, PA)

Westminster Foundation (Buffalo, NY)

Youth Policy Institute (Los Angeles, CA

“The objective is to create a safety net woven so tightly that children just can’t slip through”

HCZ Website

slide17

Holistic Approach to Student Success

Built on Collaboration and Data

Albany, NY

Albuquerque, NM

Atlanta, GA

Baltimore, MD

Bettendorf, IA

Boston, MA

Brooklyn, NY

Buff alo, NY

Cedar Rapids, IA

Charlotte, NC

Cincinnati /

Northern Kentucky

Columbus, OH

Dayton, OH

Detroit, MI

East Bay, CA

Fresno, CA

Grand Rapids, MN

Green Bay, WI

Indianapolis, IN

Louisville, KY

Marin, CA

Memphis, TN

Mesa, AR

Minneapolis, MN

Napa, CA

Nelsonville, OH

Phoenix, AR

Portland, OR

Richmond, VA

Santa Barbara, CA

San Diego, CA

San Francisco, CA

Seattle, WA

St. Louis, MO

Washington, DC

Every child. Cradle to Career

slide18

Cradle to Career Continuum

Cincinnati and No. Kentucky

slide19

Cradle to Career Continuum - Twin Cities

PRE K

ELEM.

SCHOOL

MIDDLE

SCHOOL

HIGH

SCHOOL

POST

SECONDARY

CRADLE

CAREER

At each stage, how can we determine that a student is prepared for success in the next stage on the continuum?

slide22

Simulated Case Study –

Astronaut Training

  • A controlled community of young men and women are participating in an extended training program in hopes of meeting NASA’s rigorous requirements to become astronauts. The director of the program is trying to find out why after a year in the program, many of his trainees are not accepted by NASA.
  • What are the traits of a person NASA accepts as an astronaut? DEFINE SUCCESS
  • What data is available to measure these traits among the trainees? DEFINE SUCCESS INDICATORS
  • Which of these measures are most important in determining acceptance by NASA? RANK SUCCESS INDICATORS
slide23

Success Defined

Astronaut in Training

slide24

Small Group Breakout

  • Select the either Group A (Pre K, Elementary & Middle School) or Group B (High School & Post Secondary)
  • Within each group name assign the following roles:
    • Scribe - capture notes on the flip chart
    • Spokesperson - report out the group’s results
    • Timekeeper – provide time checks to make sure each category is analyzed within the allotted time
  • Kent and Julie will facilitate the discussions
slide25

Group A

Elementary School Students

Middle School Students

Pre K Children

  • What are the traits of a pre-K child who is well prepared for success in elementary school?
  • How well do the provided indicators capture these traits?
  • Are there additional or better indicators that measure these traits?
  • Rank these indicators in terms of their importance to the success of children of color.
  • What are the traits of an elementary school student who is well prepared for success in middle school?
  • How well do the provided indicators capture these traits?
  • Are there additional or better indicators that measure these traits?
  • Rank these indicators in terms of their importance to the success of students of color.
  • What are the traits of a middle school student who is well prepared for success in high school?
  • How well do the provided indicators capture these traits?
  • Are there additional or better indicators that measure these traits?
  • Rank these indicators in terms of their importance to the success of students of color.
slide26

Group B

High School Students

Post Secondary Students

  • What are the traits of a post secondary student who is well prepared for career success ?
  • How well do the provided indicators capture these traits?
  • Are there additional or better indicators that measure these traits?
  • Rank these indicators in terms of their importance to the success of students of color.
  • What are the traits of a high school student who is well prepared for success in post secondary institutions?
  • How well do the provided indicators capture these traits?
  • Are there additional or better indicators that measure these traits?
  • Rank these indicators in terms of their importance to the success of students of color.
slide27

Small Group Report Out

For Each Category

slide28

Twin Cities Student Success Indicators

Highest Priority Across the Continuum

slide29

Next Steps

Factors Impacting Student Success

What aspects of a student’s experience that, if managed or mitigated, will significantly increase his/her likelihood of success (as measured by the Success Indicators)?

EVIDENCE BASED

ACTIONABLE

FACTORS

MEASURABLE

PRIMARY

slide30

Preparation for Meeting 2

  • Pre-read: Parsing the Achievement Gap and be prepared to discuss the relevancy in the Twin Cities of the 16 factors presented.
          • Handout available today
        • Available online at http://www.collegeready.umn.edu/resources/strive.html
  • Be prepared to recommend additional factors relevant to the Twin Cities that meet the criteria: Evidence-based, Actionable, Measurable, Primary.
  • Send to Cheryl, Julie or Kent the information that support your recommendations for sharing at the next meeting.

1.