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CS535 Programming Languages Chapter - 10 Functional Programming With Lists. Outline. Functional Language: LISP Scheme, a Dialect of LISP The structure of lists List manipulation Storage allocation for lists.

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slide1

CS535

Programming Languages

Chapter - 10

Functional Programming

With Lists

outline
Outline
  • Functional Language: LISP
  • Scheme, a Dialect of LISP
  • The structure of lists
  • List manipulation
  • Storage allocation for lists
functional language lisp
Functional Language: LISP
  • Includes all the basic concepts of
  • functional programming
  • First designed in 1958 by John McCarthy
  • Functions include recursion, first-class
  • functions and garbage collection
  • Lisp implementation led the way in
  • integrated programming environments
scheme a dialect of lisp
A scheme is a small language that provides

constructs at the core of Lisp

Constructs include:

1. Conditionals

2. The “ let ” construct

3. Quoting (data in the form of expressions)

Scheme, A Dialect Of LISP
expression
Expression
  • Scheme uses a form of prefix notation for

expressions

  • The general form of an expression in Scheme is

( E1 E2 E3 …… Eη)

  • The expression 4 + 5 * 7 is written as

( + 4 (* 5 7) )

  • The above uniformity in Lisp syntax makes

it easy to manipulate programs as data

function definition
Function Definition
  • The recursive and non recursive function definition associates a function value

with a name

  • The general syntax of function definition:

( define (<function name> <arguments>) <expression>)

  • An example:

(define ( Square X ) ( * X X ) )

; (Square 5) = 25

conditionals
Conditionals
  • Conditional expressions come in two forms

1. (if P E1 E2)

2. ( cond ( P1 E1) ….

( Pn E n )

( else E n + 1 ) )

  • Conditionals are generally required for

recursive functions

let construct
let Construct
  • The general syntax of the let construct is

( let ( (X1 E1 ) (X 2 E 2) … (X k E k) ) F )

  • For instance (3*3) + (4*4) is written as

( let ( (three-sq(square 3))

(four-sq(square 4) )

(+ three -sq four-sq) )

25

quoting
Quoting
  • Used to choose a spelling as a symbol or a variable name
  • Two methods of quoting are:

1. ( quote <item> )

2. `<item>

  • ( define f * ) // Unquoted

( f 2 3 ) 6

  • ( define f `* ) //Quoted represents symbol which is a bad procedure

( f 2 3 )

the structure of lists
The Structure of Lists

this

List 1 : (this is (a list) of elements)

is

Fig1: Tree representation

of the structure of

List 1 - () are important

a

( ) nil

list

of

elements

( )

operations on lists
Operations on Lists

List X: ()

List Y: ( this is (a list) of elements)

Basic Operation Result

1. (null? X) # t (rue)

2. ( car Y ) this (first element)

3. ( cdr X ) (is (a list) of elements)

(rest of the list after the first is removed)

4. (car (cdr X) ) is

5. (cdr (cdr X) ) ( (a list) of elements )

6. (cons a X ) ( a )

list manipulation
List Manipulation

1. Length function:

The equation for non empty list X :

(length x) = (+ 1 (length (cdr x) ) )

Corresponding length function definition:

( define (length X)

( cond ( (null? X) 0)

(else (+ 1 ( length (cdr x) ) )

)

)

2 append function
2. Append function:

The equation for appending two lists is:

(append X Z) = (cons (car X) (append (cdr X) Z))

Corresponding append function definition:

(define (append X Z)

( cond ( ( null? X) Z)

(else (cons (car X) (append (cdr X) Z) ) )

)

)

3 mapping a function
3. Mapping a function

A function f applied to a single list element

can be extended using map and applied to all

elements of the same list

Eg: Considering the square function ,

( define (square n) (* n n ) )

( map square `( 1 2 3 4 5 ) )

Result : (1 4 9 16 25)

storage allocation for lists
Storage allocation for lists
  • Implementation of lists in Scheme and ML
  • is usually done by using cells.
  • Each cell holds pointers to the head and tail
  • or car and cdr, respectively
  • The cons operation allocates a single cell
  • Each execution of consreturns a pointer to
  • anewly allocated cell
slide16

Consider the list formed from the expressions:

1. ( cons `it (cons `seems (cons `that `() ) ) )

List formed : (it seems that)

X

( )

seems

that

it

Fig2: List X created by executing the above expression

slide17

2. ( cons (car X) (cdr X) )

List Y formed: (it seems that)

Y

X

( )

seems

it

that

Fig 3: List Y created by executing the above expression

allocation and deallocation
Allocation and Deallocation
  • Cells no longer in use have to be deallocated

to avoid the problems of memory shortage

  • A standard technique is to link the cells on a list called a free list
  • A free list acts as a stack of cells on which the

standard PUSH and POP operations are performed

  • A language implementation performs the garbage collection when it returns cells to the

free list

slide19

Approaches to Deallocation of cells

  • 1. Lazy approach:
  • Deallocation starts only after all the memory
  • is exhausted, after which all the dead cells are
  • collected.
  • This method is time consuming
  • Possibility of interrupting the ongoing
  • processing
slide20

2. Eager approach:

  • Deallocating is done by checking a cell
  • for any future requirement in an operation
  • The cell is then placed on the free list to be freshly
  • allocated on a POP operation
  • Standard technique is to reserve some space
  • in each cell for a reference count of the number
  • of pointers to the cell.
implementation of garbage collection
Implementation of garbage collection
  • The Mark Sweep Approach:

1. Mark phase involves marking all the cells which

can be reached by following pointers.

2. Sweep phase involves sweeping through the memory, looking for any unmarked cells.

3. The sweeping phase starts at one end of the

memory and looks at every cell

4. Once identified, all the unmarked cells are sent

to the free list for fresh allocation.

equal and eq
Equal? And Eq?
  • Equal? - value equality
  • eq? - pointer equality