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Contracting: Setting and Meeting Expectations January 28, 2013 Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, Un PowerPoint Presentation
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Contracting: Setting and Meeting Expectations January 28, 2013 Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, University of Virginia. Begin with the end in mind. You’ll be satisfied if you end the project with:

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Contracting: Setting and Meeting Expectations January 28, 2013 Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, Un


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Contracting: Setting and Meeting ExpectationsJanuary 28, 2013 Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, University of Virginia

begin with the end in mind
Begin with the end in mind

You’ll be satisfied if you end the project with:

  • A client who values your contribution and will refer you to others… Is “super pleased”
  • Fully engaged organization
    • Organizational changes that will be adopted
    • Leadership signed on and participating
    • Line staff see value and adopt measures
  • Recommendations implemented
  • Problem solved
  • Tools and talents within organization to sustain change
how will you get there
How will you get there?
  • Contracting is using imagination and experience to envision the path
  • To ensure that you can complete it over and above expectations.
  • Begins with client and consultant relationship
  • Consultant’s task is to listen and ask good questions
    • What do they see as their needs?
    • The end deliverable they seek?
    • What is your analysis of the problem and the appropriate solution?
what is your capacity to assist
What is your capacity to assist?

Assess the match between their needs and your expertise and skills

Assess level of risk: Is the assignment realistic? Is the client’s view of the approach the most effective?

Develop your own interpretation of the “presenting problem “

Say “yes” only if you have the skills, or the capacity to learn and excel quickly

Know what you don’t know. Bring in others to assist or offer only the services you know you can deliver

Give your skills a sober and ambitious assessment

knowing what to charge
Knowing what to charge

Be precise in your estimate of hours

Ask for detailed description of client’s desired outcome.

Spend considerable time understanding the scope and deliverable: do not rush contracting

Break down project into phases for good estimate, i.e.,:

Background reading

Interviews with key staff and leadership

Facilitation

Site visits

Writing and revising reports

Analyzing results with team

Meetings with client…..

Estimating work and budget

setting rates
Setting Rates
  • In estimating, match dollars with hours
  • Be comfortable talking with client about your rates early
  • Do not provide “back of the envelope” estimate
  • Clarify client’s budget early - before contracting
  • Consider additional costs of doing business
    • Transportation, materials, lodging
  • Publish and share rates with clients pre-contract
contract components
Contract components

Be clear what is yours and what the client will do

50/50 is what Flawless Consulting (Block) calls for

Write expectations down, such as:

24-hour turn around on review of documents

Schedule and arrange all meetings. Take minutes

Time with top leadership – CEO and Board

Completion of “homework” on time

Time dedicated to complete the plan or project

Client expectations

finalizing contract
Finalizing contract
  • You have complete clarity on the charge and final product
  • You understand to the best of your ability the time it will take you
  • You have allowed for some unpredictability
  • You provide a draft to the client to review
  • Arrive at a final agreement together
  • There is trust and rapport between you and the client
  • Proposal may go through several rounds
  • Request signature of Board Chair and CEO
key components
Key components

Categories can include:

Consultant Approach

Steps to Take

Agency Expectations

Deadlines and Deliverables

Qualifications

Budget

What else?

What are essential pieces of contract?

budget
Budget

Lump Sum

Requires good estimating skills

Simpler billing process

Predictable revenue stream

Allows for more flexibility in approach

Hourly within Outside Figure

Pay as you go

Unpredictable revenue stream

Less risk of being underpaid

Less chance of being overpaid

Requesting “lump sum” or hourly free

attributes of a good contract
Attributes of a good contract
  • Early:
    • Top leadership understand and can articulate what you will be doing
    • Consultant understands the path forward and the resources he/she will need to complete
  • Later:
    • Client’s project is complete, problem is resolved
    • Client evaluation is positive
    • Deadlines and deliverables met
    • Measureable change in organization for the better