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STAGE 35. EPISTULAE. Grammar: Supine & Indirect Statements Cont. Culture: The Country Villa. The Supine. The supine is a defective 4 th declension verbal formed on the same stem as the perfect passive participle. . Only 2 forms were in common use, the accusative & ablative .

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stage 35
STAGE 35

EPISTULAE

Grammar:

Supine & Indirect Statements Cont.

Culture:

The Country Villa

the supine
The Supine
  • The supine is a defective 4th declension verbal formed on the same stem as the perfect passive participle.
  • Only 2 forms were in common use, the accusative & ablative.
  • Accusative case – must be carefully distinguished between
  • the perfect passive participle. It is used with verbs of motion
  • to indicate purpose.
  • Example: ībantRomamrogatumpecuniam – they were going
  • to Rome to ask for money.
  • Ablative case – used with neuter of certain adjectives to
  • indicate in what respect something is true.
  • Example: mirabiledictu - amazing to say; literally – amazing in
  • respect to saying
  • Example: facile factu – easy to do; literally – easy in respect to doing
the supine1
The Supine
  • Accusative case – expresses purpose
  • Example:

ad basilicamorationeshabitumvel ad curiamorationesauditumcontendo.

  • I hurry to the basilica to give speeches or to the curia to hear speeches.
  • Ablative case – used with neuter of certain adjectives to indicate in what respect something is true.
  • Example:
  • Caledoniisuntterribilesvisuaudituque.
  • The Caledonians are frightening to see and to hear.
the supine2
The Supine
  • Practice:
  • Agricola militeslaudatumhortatumque per ordinesprocessit.
  • Agricola proceeded through the lines to praise and encourage the soldiers.
  • Epaphroditus per aulamfestinavitfugitivosquaesitum.
  • Epaphroditus hurried through the palace to look for the fugitives.
  • Diu cogitabamus quid esset optimum factu.
  • For a long time we were considering what might be the best thing to do.
  • Amici ad agrummeumcotidieveniunt me vexatum.
  • Friends come to my field everyday to annoy me.
  • Dei, si hoc fasestdictu, feliciores quam nosvidentur.
  • The gods, if this is morally right to say, seem happier than us.
  • PoetaMartialis ad Urbemversūsnovosrecitatumregreditur.
  • The poet Martial is returning to the city to recite new verses.
the supine3
The Supine
  • The supine is rare in Latin; however, it is the 4th principal part of the verb and provides the stem for the perfect and future participles.
  • All vocabulary in Unit 4 will be presented with the verb’s 4 principal parts.
  • 1st person, singular, present tense
  • Infinitive
  • 1st person, singular, perfect tense
  • Supine
indirect statements cont
Indirect Statements Cont.
  • In Unit 1, you met sentences like:
  • “mercatormultampecuniamhabet,” inquit.
  • He says, “The merchant has a lot of money.”
  • “servifraudemparant.”
  • “The slaves are preparing a trick.”
  • Notice that the noun mercator &serviare in the nominative case and the verbs are habet & parant.
  • In Stage 35, you have met sentences like these:
  • Scimusmercatoremmultampecuniamhabere.
  • We know that the merchant has a lot of money. (Literally – We know the merchant to have a lot of money.)
  • Credo servos fraudemparare.
  • I believe that the slaves are preparing a trick. (Literally – I believe the slaves to be preparing a trick.)
  • In each example the statement is not being made but it is being reported or mentioned.
  • Notice that the nouns mercatorem & servos are now in the accusative case and the verbs are now in the infinitive.
indirect statements cont1
Indirect Statements Cont.
  • Compare the following examples:

DIRECT STATEMENTSINDIRECT STATEMENTS

“captividormiunt.” centuriodicitcaptivosdormire.

“The captives are asleep.” The centurion says that the captives are asleep.

“Lupos in villa rustica habitat.” audio Lupum in villa rusticahabitare.

“Lupos lives in a country house.” I hear that Lupus lives in a country house.

indirect statements cont2
Indirect Statements Cont.
  • Compare the following examples:

DIRECT STATEMENTSINDIRECT STATEMENTS

“cenaparatur.” coquusdicitcenamparari. “dinner isbeing prepared.” The cook says that dinner is being prepared.

“Serviinspiciuntur.” audio servos inspici.

“The slaves are being inspected.” I hear that the slaves are being inspected.

In these examples the verb in both statements

is passive because a deponent verb is used in both .

“miles mentitur”credimusmilitemmentiri.

“The soldier is lying.” We believe that the soldier is lying.