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What is working to close the gap in achievement? James Richardson and Jonathan Sharples www.educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk. Introduction. The EEF is an independent charity dedicated to breaking the link between family income and educational achievement .

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slide1

What is working to close the gap in achievement?James Richardson and Jonathan Sharpleswww.educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk

introduction
Introduction
  • The EEF is an independent charity dedicated to breaking the link between family income and educational achievement.
  • In 2011 the Education Endowment Foundation was set up by Sutton Trust as lead charity in partnership with the ImpetusTrust.The EEF is funded by a Department for Education grant of £125m and will spend over £200m over its fifteen year lifespan.
  • In 2013, the EEF was named with The Sutton Trust as the government-designated ‘What Works’ centre for improving education outcomes for school-aged children.
the imperative key stage 4 t op performers
The imperative: Key Stage 4 top performers

There are 428 secondary schools in which the average GCSE point score of FSM pupils exceeds the national average for all pupils (276.7 points).

These top performing schools come from across the spectrum of disadvantage (ranging from 1% FSM school intake to 61%).

FSM pupils in schools with a low and high proportions of FSM students score higher than schools in between.

slide5

“We must give educators and politicians the information they need to make wise decisions for children”

Estelle Morris

Stand on the shoulders of previous progress i.e. healthcare, engineering

  • Research is seen as something done to, not with, or for, or by the profession – culture change
the eef by numbers
The EEF by numbers

34topics in the Toolkit

3,000 schools participating in projects

600,000pupils involved in EEF projects

14 members of EEF team

6,000heads presented to since launch

£220mestimated spend over lifetime of the EEF

16independent evaluation teams

83 evaluations

funded to date

10

reports published

applying evidence in practice
Applying evidence in practice

Step 1: Decide what you want to achieve

Identify school priorities using internal data and professional judgement.

Step 2: Identifying possible solutions

Step 5: Securing and spreading change

Step 3: Giving the idea the best chance of success

Step 4: Did it work?

External evidence summarised in the Toolkit can be used to inform choices.

Evaluate the impact of your decisions and identify potential improvements for the future.

Mobilise the knowledge and use the findings to inform the work of the school to grow or stop the intervention.

Applying the ingredients of effective implementation.

applying evidence in practice1
Applying evidence in practice

Step 1: Decidewhat you want to achieve

Generate a question usingdata, professional judgement and values.

  • How can we engage and support struggling readers in Year 7?
applying evidence in practice2
Applying evidence in practice

Step 2: Identify possible solutions

Ensure that you start from the best position by seeking internal and external knowledge.

What has been shown to be effective in raising outcomes for struggling readers?

a pupil premium scenario struggling readers
A Pupil Premium Scenario – Struggling Readers

Head of English

One to one tuition

SENCO

Employ more Teaching Assistants

Parents

Class size reduction

What do you decide to spend the money on?

How do you make the most of that investment?

teaching and learning toolkit
Teaching and Learning Toolkit

The Toolkit is an accessible, teacher-friendly summary of educational research. ‘Which?’ for education

  • Practice focused: tries to give schools the information they need to make informed decisions and narrow the gap.
  • Based on meta-analyses conducted by Durham University.
teaching and learning toolkit1
Teaching and Learning Toolkit

The Toolkit is an accessible, teacher-friendly summary of educational research. ‘Which?’ for education

  • Practice focused: tries to give schools the information they need to make informed decisions and narrow the gap.
  • Based on meta-analyses conducted by Durham University.
overview of value for money
Overview of value for money

10

Feedback

Meta-cognitive

Independent learning

Pre-school

Peer tutoring

1-1 tutoring

Homework

Effect Size (months gain)

Outdoor learning

Summer schools

ICT

Phonics

After school

Smaller classes

Parental involvement

Individualised learning

Sports

Learning styles

Teaching assistants

Arts

Performance pay

0

Ability grouping

£0

£1000

Cost per pupil

using the toolkit
Using the Toolkit

Use the evidence as a starting point for discussion.

Dig deeper into what the evidence actually says

Understand the ‘active ingredients’ of implementation

slide18

Strategies for Struggling Readers

Weighted Mean Effect Size

One-to-one tutoring

slide19

Better magazine and Best Evidence in Brief

Three/year. Free for first year – www.betterevidence.org

Free fortnightly research digest – iee@york.ac.uk

applying evidence in practice3
Applying evidence in practice

Step 3: Give the idea the best chance of success

Implementation matters: have youthought about what the approachmeansforteaching and learning?

  • What are the ‘active ingredients’ for making best use of teaching assistants for struggling readers?

How much training doTA’s need?

Is there disruption to other learning?

?

How will you organise the tuition during classtime?

eef projects
EEF Projects

We are working to fund, develop and evaluate projects that:

  • Build on existing evidence.
  • Will generate significant new understanding of ‘what works’.
  • Can be replicated cost effectively if proven to work.

Examples: One-to-one support with teaching assistants, lesson observation, using mobile devices for feedback,

switch on reading
Switch on Reading
  • One to one literacy intervention with children in Year 7 who are struggling with literacy (not achieving level 4 at KS2)
  • Based on Reading Recovery. Delivered by teaching assistants, 20mins/day over 10 weeks.
  • Previous research shows a positive effect (inc. Reading Recovery).
  • RCT in 19 schools with 300 pupils
  • Attainment measured using standardised literacy measures
  • Independent evaluation by Durham University
  • Observations and interviews to inform how and why the approach might be working

http://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/projects/category/primary

what have we learned
What have we learned?

Teaching assistants, given the right support and training, can make a significant contribution to pupil attainment

Schools should take care to understand how specific programmes are having an impact in their school.

  • Implementation matters: brief, well-structured 1-2-1 sessions over a sustained period, with appropriate support and training
iee s evidence for impact database www evidence4impact org uk
IEE’s Evidence for Impact database – www.evidence4impact.org.uk
applying evidence in practice4
Applying evidence in practice

Step 4: Put energy into evaluation

Did the approachwork, what made it work, and how can it be improved next time?

Can we demonstrate that our readers are making progress? Is it worth the effort?

applying evidence in practice5
Applying evidence in practice

Step 5: Making innovation stick

Moving from what we know to what we do.

Have we captured and embedded effective small group tuition in our school? Could it make an impact in other areas?

applying evidence in practice6
Applying evidence in practice

Step 1: Decidewhat do you want to achieve

Identify school priorities using internal data and professional judgement.

Step 2: Identifying possible solutions

Step 5: Securing and spreading change

Step 3: Giving the idea the best chance of success

Step 4: Did it work?

External evidence summarised in the Toolkit can be used to inform choices.

Evaluate the impact of your decisions and identify potential improvements for the future.

Mobilise the knowledge and use the findings to inform the work of the school to grow or stop the intervention.

Applying the ingredients of effective implementation.

slide33

Thank you!

Taking part in EEF research:

james.richardson@eefoundation.org.uk

jonathan.sharples@eefoundation.org.uk