hey what about access n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Hey, What About Access? PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Hey, What About Access?

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 46

Hey, What About Access? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 115 Views
  • Uploaded on

A Practical Guide to Decision-Making. Hey, What About Access?. Roy Tennant The California Digital Library, University of California http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/presentations/2002sfs/. Outline. What are your access goals? What are your constraints? What opportunities do you have?

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Hey, What About Access?' - denali


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
hey what about access

A Practical Guide to Decision-Making

Hey, What About Access?

Roy Tennant

The California Digital Library, University of California

http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/presentations/2002sfs/

outline
Outline
  • What are your access goals?
  • What are your constraints?
  • What opportunities do you have?
  • Capturing
  • Describing
  • Providing Access
what are your access goals
What are Your Access Goals?
  • On-screen viewing
    • Thumbnail preview
    • Screen-size
    • Detail study (and how much?)
  • Printing
  • Artifactual Fidelity or Intellectual Content
printing
Printing
  • On-screen resolutions are typically inadequate for printing
  • For non-transparency material (prints, books, objects, etc.), 300dpi is a good resolution for printable versions
artifactual fidelity or intellectual content
Artifactual Fidelity or Intellectual Content?
  • Artifactual fidelity
    • Must preserve the appearance of the actual object
    • Can provide an enhanced sense of experiencing the real object
    • But in some cases, preserving the look and feel of the artifact obstructs the content
    • Doug Greenberg’s “compulsive authenticity disorder” (http://www.nedcc.org/owol/dgabs.htm)
  • Intellectual content
    • Optimized to provide the best presentation of the content itself, not the artifact
    • The sense of interacting with the actual object may be diminished or destroyed
  • Both strategies may be required
what are your constraints
What are Your Constraints?
  • Hardware
    • RAM
    • CPU speed
    • Disk space
    • Storage
  • Software
  • Staff
    • Time
    • Skill and experience
  • Money
what opportunities do you have
What Opportunities Do You Have?
  • Grants may be available to finance your project
    • Grants often expect a certain level of quality; if so, what capture quality is specified?
  • Do you have access to student help? Interns? Volunteers?
  • Can you cut a deal with a vendor like Octavo?
capturing
Capturing
  • Monitor resolutions are improving
    • 640 x 480 --> 800 x 600 --> 1280 x 768
  • What is a good resolution for onscreen viewing today, may not be tomorrow
  • How many times do you want to scan your material?
  • Scan at the best quality you can justify given your goals, constraints, and opportunities
capture recommendations for access not preservation
Capture Recommendations for Access (not preservation)
  • Photos, illustrations, maps, etc.:
    • 300dpi
    • 24 bit color
  • B/W Text document:
    • 300dpi
    • 8 bit grayscale
  • Negatives and Slides:
    • 2200 pixels in longest dimension
    • 24 bit color or 8 bit grayscale
describing
Describing
  • Good metadata is essential to your success
  • Three types:
    • Descriptive
    • Administrative
    • Structural
describing appropriate level
Describing: Appropriate Level
  • Collection-level access:
    • Discovery metadata describes the collection
    • Example: Archival finding aid; see http://www.oac.cdlib.org/
  • Item-level access:
    • Discovery metadata describes the item
    • Example: MARC or Dublin Core records for each item; see http://jarda.cdlib.org/search.html
  • Both types of access may be appropriate
  • Doing both often takes very little extra effort
collection level access
Collection Level Access

Images

Collection

Description

SearchInterface

Collection

Description

item level access
Item Level Access

Images

Collection

Descriptions

SearchInterface

describing metadata granularity
Describing: Metadata Granularity
  • <name>William Randolph Hearst</name>
  • <name> <first>William</first> <middle>Randolph</middle> <last>Hearst</last></name>
  • Consider all uses for the metadata
  • Design for the most granular use
  • Store it in a machine-parseable format
describing machine parseability
Describing: Machine Parseability
  • The ability to pull apart and reconstruct information via software
  • For example, this:<name> <first>William</first> <middle>Randolph</middle> <last>Hearst</last></name>
  • Can easily become this:<DC.creator>Hearst, William Randolph</DC.creator>
describing metadata qualification
Describing: Metadata Qualification
  • <name role=“creator”>William Randolph Hearst</name>
  • <subject scheme=“LCSH”>Builder -- Castles -- Southern California</subject>
describing formats syntax
Describing: Formats & Syntax

Which ones?

Dublin Core

MARC

XML

EAD

TEI

describing metadata storage formats
Describing: Metadata Storage Formats
  • It doesn’t matter so long as:
    • You captured the quantity required for your purposes
    • You captured it at the granularity required for your purposes
    • You qualify the metadata where required
    • You store it in a machine-parseable format
    • You can output it in any format to which you wish to comply
  • Given that, you can do anything!
describing standards
Describing: Standards
  • Decide to which industry standards you will comply
  • Use an internal metadata infrastructure that supports compliance with those standards, as well as your specific requirements
  • Consider the issues of item v. collection level, granularity, qualification, and machine parseability
  • Understand that your internal formats may be more complex than what is required for standards compliance
describing making your metadata searchable
Describing:Making Your Metadata Searchable
  • Sample Indexing Systems/Databases:
    • Sprite (Perl module)
    • Microsoft Access, Filemaker Pro
    • SWISH-E, swish-e.org
    • MySQL, mysql.com
    • Oracle or Sybase

Oracle,

Sybase

Sprite

Access/Filemaker

SWISH-E

MySQL

The power & complexity continuum

More

Less

providing access
Providing Access
  • Exhibit
  • Browse
  • Search
providing access exhibit
Providing Access: Exhibit
  • Goals:
    • Inviting
    • Easy to navigate
    • Highlight selected parts of a collection
    • Teach
  • Requirements:
    • Great graphic design
    • Informative and succinct commentary
    • Interesting subject matter
providing access browse
Providing Access: Browse
  • Goals:
    • Provide intriguing and interesting paths into and throughout a collection
    • Give a broad sense of a collection, but not show everything necessarily
  • Requirements:
    • Logical browse paths
    • May have multiple paths to the same items (e.g., time, geography, subject)
providing access search
Providing Access: Search
  • Goals
    • To provide post-coordinate access to all items in a collection relevant to a particular query
    • To provide good methods to create a search as well as refine or alter the display as required
  • Requirements:
    • Good search software (database or indexing software)
    • Good metadata (minimum is probably a title or caption for each item)
    • Good interface (options for navigation, search refinement, etc.)
recap
Recap
  • Determine what you want your users to be able to do (your access goals)
  • Consider your constraints, opportunities, and long-term goals
  • Capture images at the best quality you can stand
  • Collect metadata in an amount and form that supports your access goals as well as interoperability with relevant standards
  • Never underestimate the power of a committed individual and a cheap scanner!
final advice
Final Advice
  • Don’t scrimp on tools — staff time is the most expensive part of any project
  • For any given project, there are several ways it can succeed and countless ways it can fail
  • Do it right, or don’t do it at all?
  • NO! From the access perspective, it’s much better to do it as well as you can than to not do it at all.