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Maxwell Gade Graduate Student Syracuse University

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  1. THE FALSE POSITIVE CONUNDRUM: IDENTIFYING FALSE POSITIVES OFCONTAMINATION FROM LANDFILLS IN SEMI-ARID TO ARID WESTERNWATERSHEDS Maxwell Gade Graduate Student Syracuse University Dr. Donald Siegel Professor, Earth Science Syracuse University

  2. Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, 2010

  3. Wind River Formation

  4. Valley Fill

  5. Landfill contamination has a unique fingerprint Baedecker and Back, 1979

  6. Major Reactions • Organic matter oxidation • Carbonate mineral dissolution • Ion exchange • Sulfate reduction • Iron oxide reduction • Ammonium generation under anoxia

  7. Landfill Leachate Indicators • Alkalinity • Sodium • Chloride • Absence of Sulfate • Dissolved Organic Carbon

  8. As an assemblage natural variability is very large and has no logical trends

  9. Highest Possible Concentration

  10. Total Iron is not thermodynamically reasonable Orders of Magnitude Higher Orders of Magnitude Higher Maximum Possible Maximum Possible Total metal analyses cause false positives Plausible Plausible

  11. Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, 2010

  12. Sand Draw Case Study

  13. Water levels in wells have not varied in years

  14. Figure 4 Sodium-sulfate Water

  15. Water isotopes Fall on Completely Different Line than Modern Water Siegel, 2009

  16. Some Water is Thousands of Years Old

  17. Sand Draw Sample Comparison

  18. Sand Draw Sample Comparison

  19. Conclusions • The chemistry in ground waters contaminated with leachate must be consistent with landfill geochemical processes • The local variability of constituents needs to be assessed in a hydrological context • To avoid false positives samples should be filtered, using only dissolved constituent values