City wildlife
Download
1 / 76

City Wildlife - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 141 Views
  • Updated On :

City Wildlife. Unit 2: Open Court Lesson 4: Urban Roosts. Objectives. You will: Practice recognizing compound words. Practice recognizing related words. Recognize words with /s/ spelled sc. Recognize vivid verbs Recognize words with the /ow/ sound spelled ou and ow. Word Knowledge.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'City Wildlife' - deiondre


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
City wildlife l.jpg

City Wildlife

Unit 2: Open Court

Lesson 4: Urban Roosts


Objectives l.jpg
Objectives

  • You will:

  • Practice recognizing compound words.

  • Practice recognizing related words.

  • Recognize words with /s/ spelled sc.

  • Recognize vivid verbs

  • Recognize words with the /ow/ sound spelled ou and ow.


Word knowledge l.jpg
Word Knowledge

  • Windswept skyscraper storefront streetlights

  • Cupcake mailbox nighthawk rooftops

  • Crevice cavities nooks crannies cracks

  • Chirping hissing screeching gurgle

  • Flowerpot house throughout surrounds found


Slide4 l.jpg

Word Knowledge

  • Pigeons build nests on a ledge, or on a windowsill, or in a flowerpot out on a fire escape, or in the curve of a storefront letter.

  • Today, the pigeon flourishes all over the United States in the nooks and crannies of our cities.

  • As baby barn owls grow, they huddle together, hissing and slurping, as they wait for their parents to return with food.

  • Plants can be found in a flowerpot inside a house.


What do these words have in common l.jpg
What do these words have in common?

  • skyscraper storefront streetlights Windswept

  • Cupcake mailbox nighthawk rooftops

  • Tell your partner what two words that make up each compound word.

  • Also, tell them if the words help you understand each compound word.


What is the same with these words l.jpg
What is the same with these words?

  • Crevice cavities nooks crannies cracks

  • The words are related to each other.

  • What other words can you think of that are related to these words?


What is the same with these words7 l.jpg
What is the same with these words?

  • Chirping hissing screeching gurgle

  • These words are called vivid verbs for noises animals make.

  • With your neighbor use each word in a sentence.

  • What are some other examples of vivid verbs?


What is the spelling pattern in the next set of words l.jpg
What is the spelling pattern in the next set of words?

  • Flowerpot house throughout surrounds found

  • These words are found in “Urban Roosts.”

  • Notice the /ow/ sound. What are the spellings?

  • Ow and ou are correct!


Please read the sentences and find the pattern l.jpg
Please read the sentences and find the pattern

  • Which words are compound words?

  • Pigeons build nests on a ledge, or on a windowsill, or in a flowerpot out on a fire escape, or in the curve of a storefront letter.

  • Windowsill, flowerpot

  • Which words below are related words?

  • Today, the pigeon flourishes all over the United States in the nooks and crannies of our cities.

  • nooks/crannies


Please read the sentences and find the pattern10 l.jpg
Please read the sentences and find the pattern

  • Which words below are vivid verbs?

  • As baby barn owls grow, they huddle together, hissing and slurping, as they wait for their parents to return with food.

  • Flourishes, huddle, hissing


Please read the sentences and find the words that contain the ow sound l.jpg
Please read the sentences and find the words that contain the /ow/ sound:

  • Plants can be found in a flowerpot inside a house.

    Flowerpot, house


Slide12 l.jpg

Prior Knowledge

  • Think about what you learn about city wildlife from the “City Critters” selection.

  • What do you already know about birds’ roosts (nesting grounds) in the city.


Slide13 l.jpg

Background Information

  • This selection has factual information.

  • This is known as expository text.

  • Expository text is about anything that is true. Social studies and science books contain expository text.


Reading 2 6 pp 148o 148p l.jpg

Preview and Prepare

(Reading 2.6 pp. 148O-148P)

  • Let ‘s read aloud:the title, the author and illustrator.

  • Now let’s browse the first page or two of the story.

  • Who are the main characters?

  • Look at the illustrations in the selections.

  • Make sure you make predictions about the text to help monitor your comprehension.

  • Look for: clues, problems, such as unfamiliar words (trans. 46)

  • Now let’s look at the focus question.


Slide15 l.jpg

Set Purpose (Focus Question)

  • What is your purpose for reading this selection? Write it down.

  • Maybe, you want to learn more about expository text.

  • Think about ways birds build homes in the city.

  • You may also set other reading goals.


Slide16 l.jpg

Student Observation

  • Clues Problems Wonderings

  • Nonfiction eaves City birds sleep where?

  • Expository textWhere do city birds go when it

    rains?


Reading 1 3 1 5 p 148p trans 13 l.jpg

Selection Vocabulary

Reading 1.3, 1.5 p. 148P Trans 13

  • Abandoned originally species

    cavity suburbs clamor(Transparency 13)

  • What do these words mean?

  • Context clues, word structure (root word, prefix & suffix), apposition, prior knowledge

  • Add vocabulary words to your Writers’ Notebook in the Vocabulary Words section


Reading 1 4 p 148p trans 13 l.jpg
Reading 1.4 p. 148PTrans 13

Abandoned

originally

species

cavity

Suburbs

clamor

Selection Vocabulary


Reading 1 4 p 136p trans 12 l.jpg

Selection Vocabulary

Reading 1.4 p. 136PTrans 12

  • Abandoned: left behind or unused; either unprotected, unneeded, or unwanted (pg. 150)

  • Originally: at first, in the beginning (pg. 151)

  • Species: kind or type of plant or animal that scientists group together because the plants or animals share many of the same characteristics (pg. 151)

  • Cavity: hollow place or hole (pg. 151)

  • Suburbs: area of homes, stores, and businesses that are near or right next to a city or urban area (pg. 154)

  • Clamor: loud noise, usually for a long time (pg. 158)


Te 148q r first reading orally pgs 155 161 l.jpg

Urban Roosts

Te. 148Q-R (first reading-orally pgs. 155-161)

  • When I read this story I will:

  • Monitor my reading speed.

  • Ask Questions to clarify difficult

  • parts.

  • Summarize key events to help me

    understand the story..


Te 136q r first reading orally pgs 148 154 l.jpg

Urban Roosts

Te. 136Q-R (first reading-orally pgs. 148-154)

  • Focus Questions:

  • Many different species of birds survive in busy cities. How is this possible?

  • Do you think that people or wildlife adapt more easily to their environments? Why?


Tg 163a inquiry l.jpg

Investigating Concepts Beyond the Text

TG 163A Inquiry

  • Pigeons choose buildings that might remind them of cliffs and canyons.

  • The snowy owl chooses airport landing fields because it is like the tundra.

  • Complete Inquiry Journal, page 44 on natural habitats for animals in the city.


Te p 163f l.jpg

Language Arts Day 1

Word Analysis

(TE. P. 163F)

  • Spelling – This week, we will spell words with the /ow/ sound.

  • Flowerpot house throughout surrounds found

  • Pretest p. 32

  • Vocabulary Skill Words (context)

  • Urban crevice debris species migrate


Tg p 163g eng lang conv 1 7 l.jpg

English Language Conventions

Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics

(TG p. 163G Eng. Lang. Conv. 1.7)

  • Common nouns versus proper nouns:

  • Proper nouns name particular places: cities, states, countries, parks and buildings.

  • Santa Cruz (city)

  • Florida (state)

  • Italy (country)

  • Washington Park (park)

  • Sears Tower (building)

Complete Comprehension Book, pg. 42-43


Getting ideas responding to fiction tg p 163f writing 1 1 1 4 l.jpg

Writing Process Strategies

Getting Ideas: Responding to Fiction TG p. 163F (writing 1.1, 1.4)

  • Read Language Arts handbook, pgs. 89-91.

  • I like the selection Urban Roosts. After I read it, I felt like going bird watching in the city! I liked that Barbara Bash wrote about common birds and unusual ones. I would like to write my response to this story so that others will want to read it, too.

  • Write your ideas for your response to nonfiction in your Writer’s Notebook.


Getting ideas response to nonfiction rubric tg p 143f writing 1 1 1 4 l.jpg

Writing Process Strategies

Getting Ideas: Response to Nonfiction Rubric TG p. 143F (writing 1.1, 1.4)

  • Total point value: 10

  • There is a topic sentence. (2 points)

  • There is at least one supporting detail for the topic sentence. (2 points)

  • Opinions are supported with examples.(2 points)

  • The final copy is clean, neat, and legible. (2 points)

  • Mechanics-punctuation, spelling, and capitalization is correct. (2 points)


Slide27 l.jpg

Word Knowledge-Day 2 (TG p. 136L)

- Windswept skyscraper storefront streetlights

  • Crevice cavities nooks crannies cracks

  • Chirping hissing screeching gurgle

  • Flowerpot house throughout surrounds found

  • I need a volunteer to come up to the screen and point to a word in any of the above lines.

  • Next, raise your hand if you can read that word.


Slide28 l.jpg

Word Knowledge-Day 2 (TG p. 148L)

  • Cupcake mailbox nighthawk rooftops

  • I need a volunteer to choose one of the above words and put it in a sentence.

  • Next, I need another volunteer to continue a story by putting another word above in a sentence.


Te 136q r first reading orally pgs 148 15429 l.jpg

Urban Roosts

Te. 136Q-R (first reading-orally pgs. 148-154)

  • Focus Questions:

  • Many different species of birds survive in busy cities. How is this possible?

  • Do you think that people or wildlife adapt more easily to their environments? Why?


Te 148q r first reading orally pgs 155 16130 l.jpg

Urban Roosts

Te. 148Q-R (first reading-orally pgs. 155-161)

  • When I read this story I will:

  • Monitor my reading speed.

  • Ask Questions to clarify difficult

  • parts.

  • Summarize key events to help me

    understand the story..


Tg 160 l.jpg

Discussing Strategy Use

TG 160

  • What predictions did you make?

  • What questions did you ask yourself as you read the story?

  • Did you summarize as you read the story? When?


Tg 143a reading 2 5 3 1 l.jpg

Discussing Strategy Use

TG 143A Reading 2.5, 3.1

  • Let’s use handing off to answer these questions:

  • What types of birds live in the city?

  • Where do birds live in a city?

  • Why do different types of birds choose different spots to live?

  • What advantages does living in a city provide for birds?

  • Write your responses in the orange section of your writer’s notebook.


Reading and responding day 2 l.jpg
Reading and Responding (day 2)

  • Meet the Author(Read Pg. 162)

  • When Barbara Bash set out to illustrate a story about birds in a city environment, she traveled to New York to get ideas for her illustrations.

  • How would this help her with her illustrations?

  • Maybe it helped her better understand the city environment of New York City.


Reading and responding day 234 l.jpg
Reading and Responding (day 2)

  • Meet the Author(Read Pg. 162)

  • Barbara Bash first learned to draw letters, then worked at creating fancy lettering, called caligraphy, and finally decided to try writing and illustrating books for children.

  • How do you think spending so much time learning to carefully letter the alphabet may have helped her become a better illustrator?

  • Maybe it taught her to pay close attention to detail.


Reading 3 4 te 163 l.jpg

Theme Connections

Reading 3.4 -TE. 163

  • In your Writer’s Notebook (orange section) complete the questions on page 163.

  • Also, complete Inquiry Journal p. 30.

  • Write down what you learned about how ‘Urban Roosts’ helped you learn about City WildLife.


Te p 160b l.jpg

Concept/Question Board

TE p. 160B

  • Let’s use the Concept/Question board to:

  • Post questions we have about the story that have not been answered yet.

  • Post articles about city wildlife.

  • Answer our story focus question.


Word analysis te p 163g elc 1 8 l.jpg

Language Arts Day 2

Word Analysis (TE. P.163G) ELC 1.8

Spelling Card 39 say cow cow

Sound around clown stout drown

Sort the above words by sounds:

/ow/ spelled ou:

Sound, around, stout

/ow/ spelled ow:

Clown, drown


Reading 1 4 l.jpg

Day 2 Vocabulary

Reading 1.4

  • Species (pg. 151)

  • Think of related words for species.

  • Animals, science, biology

  • The concept of a word is its’ general idea.

  • Birds are a type of species, a grouping of animals.

  • Complete Spelling Book, pages 38 and 39.


Tg p 163g e l c 1 7 l.jpg

English Language Conventions Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics

(TG p. 163G E.L.C., 1.7)

  • Lets review capitalization of places and proper nouns.

  • Raise your hands if you know names of cities, states, countries, buildings, and parks.

  • Let’s look at pages 158-161 of ‘Urban Roosts’ for examples of proper nouns naming places.


Prewriting responding to nonfiction tg p 163g writing 1 1 1 4 l.jpg

Writing Process Strategies

Prewriting- Responding to Nonfiction TG p. 163G (Writing 1.1, 1.4)

  • Let’s review our ideas about responses of nonfiction from yesterday.

  • Let’s Read Writer’s Workbook, page 18 on prewriting a response to nonfiction.

  • Fill out your audience and purpose on page 18 of your Writer’s Workbook.

  • Assignment: Complete Writer’s Workbook,

    page 19.


Long vowels found in open syllables s spelled sc te 148m spelling card 19 33 37 l.jpg

Day 3-Phonics and Fluency

Long vowels found in open syllables /s/ spelled sc TE 148M (SPELLING CARD 19, 33-37)

  • Repeat the words. They have long vowels with open syllables.

  • Pin fin mat tot cut

  • Pine fine mate tote cute

  • Migrate later tiniest completely

  • Scene scent scientist scenario

  • The desert in Arizona is hot and dry.

  • She put the photograph on the wall.

  • These cavity nesters can slip into the tiniest spaces.


Long vowels found in open syllables s spelled sc te 148m spelling card 19 33 3742 l.jpg

Day 3-Phonics and Fluency

Long vowels found in open syllables /s/ spelled sc TE 148M (SPELLING CARD 19, 33-37)

  • Migrate later tiniest completely

  • These words contain open syllables.

  • Open syllables end in a vowel.

  • Let’s read the words again and clap the syllables:

  • Mi-grate la-ter ti-ni-est com-plete-ly

  • What are the vowel sounds in each syllable?

  • Mi-grate = i and a

  • La-ter = a and e

  • Ti-ni-est = i, I, and e

  • Com-plete-ly= o,e and y


Long vowels found in open syllables s spelled sc te 148m spelling card 19 33 3743 l.jpg

Day 3-Phonics and Fluency

Long vowels found in open syllables /s/ spelled sc TE 148M (SPELLING CARD 19, 33-37)

  • Scene scent scientist scenario

  • These words have the /s/ sound spelled sc.

  • Let’s underline the sc spelling in each word:

  • Scene

  • Scene

  • Scent

  • Scent

  • Scientist

  • Scientist

  • Scenario

  • scenario


Long vowels found in open syllables s spelled sc te 148m spelling card 19 33 3744 l.jpg

Day 3-Phonics and Fluency

Long vowels found in open syllables /s/ spelled sc TE 148M (SPELLING CARD 19, 33-37)

  • The desert in Arizona is hot and dry.

  • She put the photograph on the wall.

  • Let’s clap the syllables and point to the long vowel sounds.

  • The de-sert in Ar-i-zo-na is hot and dry.

  • She put the photo-graph on the wall.

  • Long vowels?

    Arizona = long a

  • Photograph = long o


Long vowels found in open syllables s spelled sc te 148m spelling card 19 33 3745 l.jpg

Day 3-Phonics and Fluency

Long vowels found in open syllables /s/ spelled sc TE 148M (SPELLING CARD 19, 33-37)

  • These cavity nesters can slip into the tiniest spaces.

  • This sentence is from the selection.

  • Let’s find the long vowel sounds.

    Long vowel sounds?

    These, cavity, tiniest, spaces

    Now, let’s use them in a sentence with our partners.


Silent pgs 148 154 reading 2 1 l.jpg

Day 3 Second Reading

(silent) pgs. 148-154Reading 2.1

  • Comprehension Skills – Cause and Effect

  • What does cause and effect mean?

  • Cause and effect helps readers identify what causes events to happen or what causes characters to act in certain ways.

  • As you read the story, look for cause and effect examples.

  • Track how birds build their nests in the city.


Tg p 143f science 3c 5e l.jpg

Science Connection Day 3

TG p. 143F Science 3c, 5e

  • In “Urban Roosts” we learned about the different types of birds that live in the city.

  • Choose one type of plant, or creature in the city to study.

  • Find out how they have to adapt (change) to survive.

  • For example, insects, adapt rapidly to chemical sprays that are used to destroy them.

  • Also, bird’s feathers even change color to match the color of smog pollution.


Tg p 143f science 3c 5e48 l.jpg

Science Connection Day 3

TG p. 143F Science 3c, 5e

  • What happens to wildlife that does not change?

  • What happens to wildlife that adapts more quickly than other species?

  • Present your findings in a a collage, a mobile, a picture or a storybook.


Forming conjectures te 163c l.jpg
Forming Conjectures, TE. 163c

  • Let’s discuss how our city wildlife research is going.

  • Let’ meet in groups to discuss how the project is going.

  • Start with your problem or question you want to study.

  • Next, list the books or information you need to complete your project.

  • Don’t forget to list your group members and main jobs each person has to do.

  • Complete Inquiry Journals, page 45.


P 163h eng lang conv 1 8 l.jpg

Day 3 Language Arts (Spelling)

p. 163H Eng. Lang. Conv. 1.8

  • Let’s review our Spelling words found on page 40 of our Spelling Book.

  • Think of words with a final /ow/ sound found around the classroom.

  • Flower brown sound

  • Complete Spelling Book page 40.


Te p 163h l.jpg

Day 3 Vocabulary

TE. P. 163H

  • urban

  • Read the sentence with urban on page 148.

  • Think of words from nearby sentences related to urban. Let’s write those words next to

  • Related Words:

  • City, roost, building, habitat, town

  • Urban is describing the place where birds nest.

  • Urban is the idea of cities, buildings, and towns.


Eng lang conv 1 7 tg p 163h l.jpg

Day 3 English Language Conventions

Eng. Lang. Conv. 1.7 TG. p. 163H

  • Read L.A. Handbook, pg. 276 on capitalizing places.

  • Name a city, state, country, park or building you want to visit. Write it down and explain why you want to visit that place.

  • Name particular places in Fontana where birds might want to roost (nest).

  • Now, write two or three sentences explaining where birds might roost in Fontana.


Drafting response to nonfiction tg 163h writing 1 1 1 4 l.jpg

Writing Process Strategies Day 3

Drafting : Response to Nonfiction (TG 163H) Writing 1.1, 1.4

  • Let’s read Writer’s Workbook, page 19 on drafting.

  • The topic sentence of a paragraph tells who or what the paragraph is about and states the main idea of the paragraph.

  • The first sentence in a paragraph is often the topic sentence.

  • The topic sentence should graph readers’ attention and make them want to read more.

  • Read L.A. handbook, page 182 on topic sentences.

  • Read Comprehension Book, pages 44-45 on topic sentences.

  • Complete Writer’s Workbook, page 19 (response 1st draft).


P 148l l.jpg

Developing Oral Language

p. 148L

  • Pin fin mat tot cut

  • Pine fine mate tote cute

  • Migrate later tiniest completely

  • Scene scent scientist scenario

  • I need a volunteer to choose one of the above words and put it in a sentence.

  • Next, let’s try to extend the sentence using the above words.


Choose the best word to fit in the sentence p 148l l.jpg

Developing Oral Language

Choose the best word to fit in the sentence, p. 148L

  • Pin fin mat tot cut

  • Pine fine mate tote cute

  • Migrate later tiniest completely

  • Scene scent scientist scenario

  • The shark has a ____ on its’ body.

  • fin

  • The ______ studies plants in a lab.

  • scientist

  • The word means situation.

  • scenario


Slide56 l.jpg

Syllabication Lesson 3

  • Let’s clap the syllables to the following words:

  • Pin fin mat tot cut

  • Pine fine mate tote cute

  • Mi-grate la-ter ti-ni-est com-plete-ly

  • Scene scent sci-en-tist scen-ar-io


Silent pgs 155 161 reading 2 1 l.jpg

Day 3 Second Reading

(silent) pgs. 155-161Reading 2.1

  • Comprehension Skills – Cause and Effect

  • What does cause and effect mean?

  • Cause and effect helps readers identify what causes events to happen or what causes characters to act in certain ways.

  • As you read the story, look for cause and effect examples.

  • Track how birds build their nests in the city.


Second reading checking comprehension pg 161 reading 2 3 l.jpg

“Urban Roosts”

Second Reading-Checking Comprehension, pg. 161 (reading 2.3)

  • What kind of city wildlife did you read about in this selection?

  • This selection is about different kinds of birds in the city.


Second reading checking comprehension pg 143 reading 2 3 l.jpg

“Urban Roosts”

Second Reading-Checking Comprehension, pg. 143 (reading 2.3)

Where are some of the places that birds roost in the city?

Some birds roost on window ledges and on top of roofs. Others roost on building ornaments, in cavities, under train and highway overpasses and under bridges.


Second reading checking comprehension pg 143 reading 2 360 l.jpg

“Urban Roosts”

Second Reading-Checking Comprehension, pg. 143 (reading 2.3)

Why do birds come to the city to live?

They can find places to live and food to eat.


Reading 1 4 p 136p trans 13 l.jpg

Selection Vocabulary

Reading 1.4 p. 136PTrans 13

  • Enormous

  • delighted

  • cozy

  • Bursting

  • Responsibility

  • beckoned


Day 4 tg p 143e reading 3 1 l.jpg

Literary Elements fiction vs. nonfiction

Day 4 TG p. 143E Reading 3.1

  • Writers make their text interesting by carefully choosing details they add.

  • Details help readers imagine settings and actions, helping them visualize and understand what they read.

  • Details may take the form of vivid adjectives or verbs or very precise step-by step instructions.

  • Attention to detail makes the difference between an okay piece of writing and excellent, lively writing.


Day 4 tg p 161d reading 2 1 l.jpg
Day 4 TG p. 161D Reading 2.1

  • Reread “Urban Roosts” and pay attention to all of the descriptive language.

  • Identify details that bring the story to life and write down examples in your writer’s folder.

  • Example: sleekly built with powerful wings

  • When you finish, look in your writing folder for a piece of writing that you can revise by adding vivid, descriptive details.

  • Share your finished work with the class

    (later this week).


Day 4 tg p 161d reading 2 164 l.jpg

Parts of a book (index)

Day 4 TG p. 161D Reading 2.1

  • What do you know about using an index?

  • An index is an alphabetical list of key words and topics.

  • A topic may have a subtopic.

  • An index may refer readers to other topics.

  • Each key word may reference one or more pages.

  • Let’s work on Inquiry Journal, pages 46-47.

  • Is there a listing in the index for pigeons?

  • Yes


Day 4 tg p 161d reading 2 165 l.jpg

Parts of a book (index)

Day 4 TG p. 161D Reading 2.1

  • What are the subtopics under pigeon?

  • Babies, calls, descriptions, in the city, mating, nests

  • On what pages would you find information about pigeon babies?

  • Pages 49-50

  • What topics does the index refer you to under the topic Pigeons?

  • Dove, passenger pigeon, racing pigeon.

  • Complete Inquiry Journal, pages 46-47.


Slide66 l.jpg

Day 4 Spelling The final /el/ sound

  • The following activities will help us learn the final /ow/ sound:

  • Complete Spelling Book, page 41.

  • crevice (pg. 152)

  • Find the context clues for crevice.

  • Context Clues:

  • Disappear into, behind, spots

  • Look in the dictionary to find related words to crevice.

  • Related Words: ________, ___________, ________

  • What is the concept of crevice?

  • A place to hide, a small space, a crack


Tg 163i listen speak 1 8 l.jpg

English Language Convention Day 4

TG 163I listen/Speak 1.8

Viewing: Using visual Aids

  • Visual aids make oral presentations more informative and exciting.

  • They give the audience more information, and they give them something to focus their attention on.

  • We can use many things for visual aides:

  • Simple objects, charts, or maps

  • Visual aids should be meaningful and related to your presentation.


Tg 163i listen speak 1 0 l.jpg

English Language Convention Day 4

TG 163I listen/Speak 1.0

Visual Aides

  • In partners, discuss what visual aides you would use to do a presentation on birds.

  • Topic: Where birds live

  • What visual aids could you use for this topic?

  • Pictures or photos of places where birds live, a bird nest

  • What is a visual aid and how is it useful?

  • Why would visual aides be important for a class presentation?

  • The audience can see what kind of bird is being referred to; something to capture the audience’s attention

English Language Convention Day 4


Writing process strategies day 4 revising response to nonfiction tg 163i writing 1 1 1 4 l.jpg
Writing Process Strategies: Day 4 Revising: Response to Nonfiction TG 163I Writing 1.1, 1.4

  • Let’s look at transparency 25 on revising: sentence fluency.

  • When the other sentences in a paragraph stray away from the main idea of the paragraph, readers can get lost or lose interest.

  • Giving opinions without supporting your thoughts makes it difficult for readers to believe your writing. Using details you are unsure of can lead to inaccuracies.


Writing process strategies day 4 revising response to nonfiction tg 163i writing 1 1 1 470 l.jpg
Writing Process Strategies: Day 4 Revising: Response to Nonfiction TG 163I Writing 1.1, 1.4

  • Revise your drafts of your response to nonfiction.

  • Revise your writing using what you learned about organization of responses to nonfiction.

  • Complete the checklist and proofreading marks on page 20 of your Writer’s Workbook.


Day five l.jpg
Day Five…

  • General Review –

  • Word Knowledge

  • Lesson Assessment(Reading 2.1, 2.2 & 3..3 )

    • “Urban Roosts” pp. 14-17 (TG p. 133I)

  • Spelling – The /ow/ sound (E.L.C. 1.8)

    • Unit 2 Assessment 4 p. 33

  • VocabularyAssessment Unit 2,lesson 3

    pg. 17 (Reading 1.2, 1.3 & 1.4)


Reading 1 4 p 136p trans 1272 l.jpg

Selection Vocabulary

Reading 1.4 p. 136PTrans 12

  • Abandoned: left behind or unused; either unprotected, unneeded, or unwanted (pg. 150)

  • Originally: at first, in the beginning (pg. 151)

  • Species: kind or type of plant or animal that scientists group together because the plants or animals share many of the same characteristics (pg. 151)

  • Cavity: hollow place or hole (pg. 151)

  • Suburbs: area of homes, stores, and businesses that are near or right next to a city or urban area (pg. 154)

  • Clamor: loud noise, usually for a long time (pg. 158)


Tg 136f l.jpg

Investigating Concepts Beyond the Text

TG 136F

  • Concept/Question Board

  • Post questions you have about the story.

  • Post questions you may have about the story before reading it, if they were unanswered.

  • Bring in items, newspaper articles and stories about competition, and cooperation.

  • You can sign out and read books from the concept/question board (for in class only).


English language conventions l.jpg

Penmanship

English Language Conventions

  • Let’s practice using cursive e and l:

  • e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e

  • L l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l

  • Raise your hand in order to come to the board and trace the letters e and l.

  • Practice writing rows of es and ls in your Writer’s Notebook.

  • Write the words, the, long and dove to practice your letter formation.


Writing process strategies editing proofreading publishing day 5 writing 1 1 1 4 l.jpg

Writing Process Strategies

Writing Process Strategies Editing/Proofreading/Publishing (Day 5) Writing 1.1, 1.4

  • Let’s read Writer’s Workbook, pg. 17 on editing/proofreading.

  • Assignment: Edit your book review.

  • Use the checklist on Writer’s Workbook, pg. 17 to help you.

  • Make a neat final copy in your best cursive handwriting.


Getting ideas book reviews rubric tg p 143f writing 1 1 1 4 l.jpg

Writing Process Strategies

Getting Ideas: Book Reviews Rubric TG p. 143F (writing 1.1, 1.4)

  • Total point value: 10

  • There is a topic sentence of each paragraph.

    (2 points)

  • The main idea is clearly stated in the first paragraph.

    (2 points)

  • Opinions are supported with examples.(2 points)

  • The final copy is clean, neat, and legible. (2 points)

  • Mechanics-punctuation, spelling, and capitalization is correct. (2 points)