food waterborne diseases integrated research network l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 68

FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 217 Views
  • Uploaded on

FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK. Cornell University Zoonoses Research Unit PI: Yrj ö T. Gröhn, DVM, PhD Program Officer: Robert Hall, PhD April 3, 2008 http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/ytg1 / http://www.vet.cornell.edu/popmed/.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK' - deidra


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
food waterborne diseases integrated research network
FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

Cornell University Zoonoses Research Unit

PI: Yrjö T. Gröhn, DVM, PhD

Program Officer: Robert Hall, PhD

April 3, 2008

http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/ytg1/

http://www.vet.cornell.edu/popmed/

food waterborne diseases integrated research network2
FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

Currently Cornell has two completed and four projects underway

1. Salmonella:

1.1. Transmission of MDR Salmonella - ZC001-03

PD – Professor Lorin Warnick

Co - PD – Professor Martin Wiedmann

1.2.Sources and transmission of MDR Salmonella strains that cause human

infection-ZC006-07

PD – Professor Lorin Warnick

Co - PD – Professor Martin Wiedmann

2. Molecular Diagnosis:

2.1.Molecular Diagnosis of Bacterial Pathogens - ZC002-03

PD – Professor Yung-Fu Chang

2.2. C. difficile: Comparative Genomics and Strain Differentiation- ZC005-06

PD – Professor Yung-Fu Chang

3. Evolutionary Genomics:

3.1.Molecular Evolution of Campylobacter Diversity - ZC003-05

PD – Professor Michael Stanhope

4. Host Microbiota:

4.1.The Role of the Host Microbiota in Enteric Disease Development - ZC004-06

PD - Professor Craig Altier

1 1 transmission of mdr salmonella project no zc001 03

FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

1.1.Transmission of MDR SalmonellaProject No. ZC001-03

PD: Lorin Warnick

http://www.popmed.vet.cornell.edu/bios/warnick.asp

Co PD: Martin Wiedmann

http://www.foodscience.cornell.edu/faculty/wiedmann.htm

Co-investigators: Yrjo Grohn, Pat McDonough, Ynte Schukken

Project Aims:

  • Determine key factors which determine the course of clinical outbreaks of (MDR) Salmonella in dairy cattle (industry funding).
  • Develop infectious disease transmission models and estimate transmission parameters for MDR Salmonella
  • Evaluate the relationships among MDR Salmonella isolates from cattle and human samples
why salmonella
Why Salmonella?
  • Leading human foodborne pathogen (more deaths than any other known human foodborne pathogen)
    • Estimated 550 deaths among 1.4 million cases annually in the US
    • No clear decline in human salmonellosis infections despite decline in infections with other foodborne pathogens
  • Emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant Salmonella is a concern
    • More severe illness and increased risk of hospitalization
    • Dairy cattle may be important source of MDR Salmonella (e.g. Newport, Typhimurium, 4,5,12:i:- , and Dublin)
aim 1 1 1 field project highlights

ST 25

ECO157H7

ST 75

90

ST 77

ST 1

ST 2

ST 3, 14, 22*, 23, 26, 50, 82, 83

ST 15*

ST 24*

ST 36

ST 79

ST 48

75

ST 18

ST 81

ST 19, 20*, 21

ST 5* 6, 47, 49, 51

64

ST 7

Newport Type B

(humans, birds)

ST 8

ST 42, 43

53

ST 27

ST 12*

ST 13, 46, 70, 76, 78

ST 17, 34

54

ST 73

ST 41

ST 39, 84

ST 16*

ST 29

ST 28

ST 30

ST 4, 9

ST 37

ST 44

63

ST 32

ST 35, 74

Newport Type A

(cattle and humans,

often MDR; ST31 is an S. Litchfield isolate)

ST 11, 31, 85

82.8

ST 33

82

ST 38

ST 80

ST 10*

53

ST 40

ST 45

Aim 1.1.1: Field Project Highlights
  • 10% of herds per year had laboratory-confirmed salmonellosis
  • Typhimurium and Newport accounted for >50% of affected herds
    • Both types frequently associated with multi-drug resistance
  • Identified emerging serotype 4,5,12:i:- in several herds
  • Results suggest that herds with clinical outbreaks represent most risk for human exposure to MDR Salmonella
    • Salmonella rarely isolated from non-clinical control farms
    • Shedding persists long after recovery
  • Subtyping Salmonella isolates from cattle and humans identified both overlapping and distinct populations
    • MDR Newport, Typhimurium, and 4,5,12:i:- were common to both
duration of fecal salmonella shedding following clinical disease in animal hosts
Duration of Fecal Salmonella Shedding Following Clinical Disease in Animal Hosts

Implications of continued shedding:

  • Environmental contamination
  • Within-herd transmission
  • Transmission to other herds
  • All of the above lead to increased risk of transmission to humans
results summary
Results: Summary
  • Fecal Salmonella shedding often persists beyond clinical outbreak in herd and may exceed 1 year
  • The proportion of animals shedding for at least 2 months was significantly higher in adult cows than calves (Fisher’s exact test p-value=0.008)
  • Results from these 22 herds improve on data from past studies in relatively few outbreak herds
    • Provides parameter estimates for Salmonella transmission modeling
aim 2 highlights in mathematical modeling

INFECTION CONTROL

Control at the human population

(e.g. hygiene, human vaccination)

HUMAN

HEALTH

INFECTION

RESERVOIR

Aim 2: Highlights in Mathematical Modeling

Control at the transmission routes

(e.g. heat treatments)

Control at the infection reservoir

using mathematical modeling approach
Using mathematical modeling approach …

To understand the ecology, emergence and spreadof

MDR Salmonella in infection reservoirs and to help

designing effective control strategies.

Specifically, we address…

  • How the heterogeneity in host infectiousness affects the dynamics of transmission and the efficacy of control strategies within the infection reservoir.
  • Dynamics of infection in small transient populations.
1 heterogeneity in host infectiousness
1. Heterogeneity in host infectiousness
  • Clinically infected individuals were the main force of infection transmission.
  • Subclinically infected individuals with long infectious period but low contagiousness had a small impact on transmission.
  • High efficacy vaccines were necessary to eradicate infection.
  • The presence of super-shedders made necessary the application of strategies targeting this specific group rather than population-wide control strategies.

*Lanzas C. et al, The effect of heterogeneous infectious period and contagiousness on thedynamics of Salmonella transmission in dairy cattle, Epidemiology and Infection,2008, 136, 1496-1510.

2 dynamics of infection in small transient populations
2. Dynamics of infection in small transient populations
  • Enteric multidrug resistant pathogens transmit effectively in small populations (e.g. health care facilities, farms).
  • Large fluctuations in the prevalence of infection happen by chance and infections have a large probability of extinction.
  • Extensive research in infection control practices, but little research on the underlying dynamics of infection… What favors transmission?
dynamics of infection in small transient populations modeling approach
Dynamics of infection in small transient populations: modeling approach
  • Development of an indirect transmission model for enteric multidrug resistant pathogens.
  • Study of the infection dynamics without infection control (salmonellosis in a calf-rearing operation as a case study*).
  • Evaluation of intervention strategies to control infection.
  • Development of a theoretical framework

*Lanzas C., et al., The risk and control of Salmonella outbreaks in calf-rearing operations, Veterinary Research, 2008: 39:61.

factors that favor infection persistence in small populations
Factors that favor infection persistence in small populations
  • High turnover rates of the system

(continual replenishment of the susceptible pool)

  • Continual admission of infected individuals from the ‘community’ level
  • Environmental reservoirs
intervention strategies to control infection

(a)

1000

800

600

number of cases

400

200

0

base

adm50

adm100

imm75

imm37

imm20

shed30

shed60

cont33

cont66

hyg33

hyg66

scenario

1500

(b)

1000

duration of outbreak (days)

500

0

base

adm50

adm100

imm75

imm37

imm20

shed30

shed60

cont33

cont66

hyg33

hyg66

scenario

Intervention strategies to control infection

Most effective strategies:

Assigning workers/ equipment to groups of individuals

Complete close of the facilities to incoming individuals

Immunization of a high proportion of admitted individuals

Hygiene

Without interventions

slide19

FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

1.2. Sources and transmission of MDR Salmonella strains that cause human infection Project No. ZC006-07

PD: Lorin Warnick

http://www.popmed.vet.cornell.edu/bios/warnick.asp

Co-investigators: Yrjo Grohn, Pat McDonough,

Martin Wiedmann

Joint project with WSU ZRU

slide20

FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

Project Aims:

  • Subtyping methods for highly clonal MDR Salmonella
  • Retrospectively characterize the distribution and transmission of MDR Salmonella in the northeastern and northwestern U.S.
  • Prospectively monitor evolution and emergence of MDR strains
  • Identify risk factors for human acquisition of MDR Salmonella
  • Define targets for control strategies through field studies
salmonella serotype 4 5 12 i is a major emerging salmonella serotype
Salmonella serotype 4,5,12:i:- is a major emerging Salmonella serotype
  • A monophasic variant of Salmonella Typhimurium
  • First been reported in the literature in 1993 (Thailand)
  • Prevalence of serotype 4,5,12:i:- among human salmonellosis cases has increased considerably over the last 10 – 15 years
  • In the U.S., serotype 4,5,12:i:- represented 0.2 % and 2.3% of human clinical isolates in 1995 and 2005, respectively.
  • Responsible for human salmonellosis outbreak linked to poultry pot pies in 2007.
aim 1 characterization of salmonella serotype 4 5 12 i
Aim 1: Characterization of Salmonella serotype 4,5,12:i:-
  • Developed a collection of 102 Salmonella Typhimurium and 92 Salmonella 4,5,12:i:- isolates from different sources (human, animal, and food) and geographical locations (US [NY, GA, WA] and Spain)
  • Characterized isolates by different subtyping methods (MLST, PFGE, PCR screens for presence/absence of selected genes, including genes responsible for phase 2 flagella expression)
aim 1 highlights evolution and emergence of salmonella serotype 4 5 12 i
Aim 1: Highlights - Evolution and emergence of Salmonella serotype 4,5,12:i:-
  • Salmonella 4,5,12:i:- isolates from Spain and the US appear to largely represent distinct clones with distinct gene deletion patterns
    • One US isolate matches the “Spanish clone”
  • Salmonella 4,5,12:i:- represents multiple independent emergence events, including the common US and Spanish clones as well as additional rare 4,5,12:i:- genotypes
  • Future efforts will focus on (i) understanding worldwide distribution of different 4,5,12,i:- clones, (ii) the evolution of antibiotic resistance in 4,5,12i:- strains, and (iii) probing the potential selective advantage of a loss of phase 2 flagella expression.
aim 2 retrospective molecular subtyping of human and animal salmonella isolates
Aim 2: Retrospective molecular subtyping of human and animal Salmonella isolates
  • Characterized 157 clinical Salmonella isolates from cattle and 178 clinical Salmonella isolates from humans by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE)
  • 167 PFGE patterns, 116 patterns unique to human isolates, 44 unique to cattle isolates; 7 patterns found among both human and cattle isolates
    • Subtype data available in PathogenTracker
  • Among cattle isolates, three PFGE types were identified in multiple farms in adjacent counties, indicating geographical clustering of Salmonella subtypes
aim 4 case case study
Aim 4: Case-case study
  • Objective: Identify risk factors for MDR Salmonella infections (Newport, Typhimurium, and 4,5,12:i:-) in people
    • In collaboration with NY State Department of Health
    • specifically, we will determine the relative importance of foodborne exposure and direct contact for MDR Salmonella transmission
  • Patients infected with Salmonella isolates matching bovine strains by serotype, antibiotic resistance, and PFGE profile will be compared to patients with Salmonella isolates that are pan-susceptible and not associated with cattle
case case study
Case-case Study…
  • Data collected by the NYSDOH from Emerging Infections Program counties
  • Currently have questionnaire data and isolates representing 72 cases
    • Enteritidis: 17% (12)
    • Typhimurium: 17% (12)
    • Newport: 9% (6)
    • Tennessee: 7% (5)
    • Heidelberg: 4% (3)
    • Thompson: 4% (3)
    • 20 other serotypes
aim 5 field study
Aim 5: Field Study
  • Objective: Determine the effect of clinical Salmonella outbreaks in dairy cattle on the prevalence of MDR Salmonella fecal shedding and environmental contamination
  • This will help guide control strategies for reducing the public health threat of bovine salmonellosis
    • For example, can high risk herds be recognized by clinical laboratory accessions or is surveillance required in herds without clinical disease?

(See poster for preliminary results)

food waterborne diseases integrated research network31
FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

2.1. Molecular Diagnosis of Bacterial Pathogens

Project No. ZC002-03

PD – Professor Yung-Fu Chang

http://www.popmed.vet.cornell.edu/bios/chang.asp

The overall goal of this project is to:

Develop a multi-pathogen identification microarray for high confidence identification of food- and water-borne pathogens based on their virulence factors as probes.

Work completed

publication
Publication
  • Ku et al. 2005. Identification and characterization of in vivo attenuated mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis using signature-tagged mutagenesis in a pig infection model. Infect. Immun. 73:8194-8203.
  • Palaniappan et al. 2006. Differentiation of Escherichia coli pathotypes by oligonucleotide spotted array. J. Clin. Microbiol. 44:1495-1501.
  • Yu et al. 2007. Prevalence and characterization of multidrug-resistant (ACSSuT) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from our Gosling’s farms and a hatchery farm. J. Clin. Microbiol. 46:522-526.
  • Scaria et al. 2008. Microarray for molecular typing of Salmonella enterica serovars. Mol. Cell Probes 22:238-243.
  • Scaria et al.Microbial Diagnostic Array Workstation (MDAW): A Web Server for Diagnostic Array Data Storage, Sharing and Analysis. Source Code Biol. Med. 3:14-18.
  • Scaria et al. Development of a microarray for detection of antimicrobial genes. In preparation.
food waterborne diseases integrated research network33
FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

Clostridium difficile:genomic and transcritome studies

Project No. ZC005-06

PD – Professor Yung-Fu Chang

http://www.popmed.vet.cornell.edu/bios/chang.asp

clostridium difficile
Clostridium difficile

A spore-forming, gram-positive bacillus that produces exotoxins that are pathogenic to humans

C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD) ranges in severity from mild diarrhea to fulminant colitis and death

Antimicrobial use is the primary risk factor for development of CDAD because it disrupts normal bowel flora and promotes C. difficile overgrowth

objectives
Objectives

1. To perform a comparative genomic study of C. difficile and establish a microarray database

2. To develop a specific diagnostic microarray for diagnosis of Clostridial species

3. To study the transcriptome/proteome of C. difficile grown in vitro and in vivo

comparative genomics of clostridium difficile overview of the microarray results
Comparative genomics of Clostridium difficileOverview of the microarray results

Equine Bovine Swine Food Human

flagella related genes
Flagella-related genes

Eq Bv Sw Fd Human

virulent genes
Virulent genes

Eq Bv Sw Fd Human

pfge pattern
PFGE pattern

Eq Bv SwFd Human

on going works
On-going works

2. Development of a diagnostic array for Clostridial species

3. Study of the transcriptome/proteome of C. difficile during its infection in vivo using a pig model as a host

slide43

FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

3.1. Evolution of Campylobacter diversityProject No. ZC003-05PD – Professor Michael Stanhopemjs297@cornell.edu
  • Project start date: 04/01/06
  • Campylobacter - most common

bacterial cause of foodborne

illness in USA and much of the

developed world

Two species of particular importance: C. jejuni and C. coli

    • Sheep, cattle, pigs, and poultry - both C. jejuni and C. coli; C. jejuni predominates in bovine and chicken - C. coli in swine and turkey
evolution of campylobacter diversity introduction
Evolution of Campylobacter diversityIntroduction…
  • Principal overall goal of this project:
    • provide detailed understanding of genetic diversity and molecular adaptation of Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni in relation to their different hosts
      • corollary purpose: assess whether there are particular animal reservoirs and/or strains serving as more likely sources of human infection and antibiotic resistance.
slide45

Expanded MLST scheme: 16 genes; 70 C. coli isolates, from swine, chicken, bovine, and human.Sequence types (ST) and clonal complexes identified based on Campylobacter MLST database (http://pubmlst.org/campylobacter/)

slide46

Analysis of 16 gene MLST

Genotypic similarity defining

clonal complex = 13/16 shared alleles

Genotypic similarity defining

clonal complex = 12/16 shared alleles

Fisher exact test; null hypothesis of

independence of genotype and host: P<0.001

Fisher exact test; null hypothesis of

independence of genotype and host: P<0.001

Bovine

Human

Chicken

Swine

=> Evidence supporting C. coli host specific ecotypes

genome adaptation
Genome Adaptation
  • gene presence/absence
  • molecular adaptation of protein coding genes
  • gene regulation
microarrays
Microarrays
  • Genome sequence allows gene presence / absence detection across strains using microarrays
    • E.g. Combimatrix 4 X 2K microarrays
slide49

Swine

Bovine

Chicken

Dendrogram and heatmap of variable genes among 36 C. coli test strains using oligonucleotide microarray• sets of genes common to isolates derived from different hosts - human isolates currently under experimentation

ancestral genome reconstruction
Ancestral genome reconstruction
  • Ancestral genomes reconstructed from composition of interspecies genome comparisons;
    • provides assessment of gene/presence absence in an evolutionary context
      • Gene gain, loss and duplication on each lineage
molecular adaptation
Molecular adaptation
  • Powerful statistical methods for detecting adaptive molecular evolution
    • Nonsynonymous substitution rate elevated above the synonymous rate as evidence for positive selection
      • Fixation of advantageous mutations, driven by natural selection =>evolutionary innovations
  • assess positive selection pressure across core genome components of comparative taxa, identifying genes and sites within genes of key functional significance
slide53

Gene gain and loss

- pronounced genome flexibility in the

evolution of Campylobacter species

- many LGT islands, particularly C. coli

- large proportion of gained loci are

hypothetical genes

gene gain

gene loss

slide54

Positive selection

- large proportion of the core-genome under PS

- more PS on C. coli lineage than C. jejuni

- large proportion of PS loci are hypotheticals

slide55

Distribution of positive selection across lineages and genes

• high levels of PS in Campy

• Campy PS quite evenly distributed across gene categories and rarely specific to a lineage

• same loci frequently under positive selection across multiple lineages

evolution of campylobacter diversity current and future activities
Evolution of Campylobacter diversityCurrent and future activities…..
  • Next generation genome sequencing [454 (collaboration with MSU) and Solexa (Cornell)] of C. coli and C. jejuni isolates from different hosts and putative ecotypes
    • Solexa: comparative data across core genome of multiple strains
      • New population genetic methods => genes under positive selection pressure across clones and ecotypes of C. coli and C. jejuni;
  • Identification of putative non-coding functional elements
    • Phylogenetic footprinting
      • Inter-specific genome wide alignments: conserved non-coding sequence elements

=> comprehensive picture of molecular adaptation in C. jejuni and C. coli = genes of greatest functional significance to Campylobacter species and ecotypes (e.g. what are the key molecular adaptation differences between human and animal ecotypes?); evolutionary hypotheses that can serve as a guide to mutation experiments, to assay functional significance.

slide57

FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

4.1.The role of the host microbiota in enteric disease development

  • PD: Craig Altierhttp://www.cvm.ncsu.edu/dphp/micro/altier.html
  • Co PDs: Bettina Wagner, Michael Stanhope, and Vincent Young
  • Project aims:
  • Develop a mouse model to study the interaction of normal microbiota with the intestine in enteric disease
  • Define a map of microbial population changes throughout the intestine that result from antibiotic administration and lead to increased susceptibility to enteric infection.
  • Characterization of protective innate and adaptive mucosal immune responses to the Salmonella pathogen influenced by changes in the normal intestinal microbiota.
characterization of the intestinal microbiota in normal and antibiotic treated mice

A.

OTUs

B.

OTUs

OTUs

C.

Characterization of the intestinal microbiota in normal and antibiotic-treated mice

The ileum, the site of infection by important enteric pathogens, harbors a microbiota distinct from other areas of the intestinal tract. The mucosal-associated bacteria of this region also differ from those of the intestinal lumen, with segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) comprising a significant portion of the population. Streptomycin greatly changes this population structure, reducing the proportion of SFB present.

slide60

Cytokines/chemokines secreted by intestinal tissues of mice infected with Salmonella +/- streptomycin treatment

Intestinal tissues (ileum, colon, cecum) were cultured o/n and cytokines/chemokines were measured in the supernatants using a multipex assay and Luminex technology.

No detectable concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-13 and TNF- in all samples.

For FGF, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, KC, MCP-1, VEGF no difference were detected between both groups.

slide61

Significant differences between mice receiving Salmonella only and Salmonella and with streptomycin

Cytokines increased in streptomycin-treated mice are indicated with . Those that were reduced in streptomycin-treated mice are indicated with .

the fatty acid environment of the intestinal varies within specific regions of the tract

Ileum

Cecum

The fatty acid environment of the intestinal varies within specific regions of the tract

Cecum

Ileum

slide63

Intestinal fatty acids regulate Salmonella virulence, with formate inducing expression of invasion genes, and propionate and butyrate repressing it

summary

FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

Summary
  • Research focus areas at the Cornell ZRU
  • Collaboration and associated projects
  • Leveraging institutional resources        
slide65
Research Focus Areas at the Cornell ZRU

Network priorities (high priority areas in FWD IRN):

“Define the ecology and microbiology of food and waterborne zoonoses as well as drug-resistant pathogens”

Project:Transmission of MDR Salmonella (ZC001-03)

Lorin Warnick and Martin Wiedmann

Project:Molecular Diagnosis of Bacterial Pathogens (ZC002-03) Yung-Fu Chang

Project:Sources and transmission of MDR Salmonella strains that cause human infection

(ZC006-07) Lorin Warnick

Statements of Objectives: “Antibiotic Resistance and Campylobacter”

Project:Molecular Evolution of Campylobacter Diversity (ZC003-05) Michael Stanhope

Statements of Objectives: “Intestinal Flora Research Areas”

Project:The Role of the Host Microbiota in Enteric Disease Development (ZC004-06) Craig Altier

Statements of Objectives: “Clostridium difficile”

Project:C. difficile: Comparative Genomics and Strain Differentiation (ZC005-06) Yung-Fu Chang

FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

slide66
Collaborations and Associated Projects

Washington State University

Sources and transmission of MDR Salmonella strains that cause human

infection (ZC006-07)

New York State Department of Health

Food Safety Research and Response Network

Johne’s Project

Michigan State University

The Role of the Host Microbiota in Enteric Disease Development (ZC004-06)

Salmonella Enteritidis MLVA

Campy and Molecular Evolution

FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

slide67
Leveraging Institutional Resources

Infectious Disease Research Suite

PIs housed in new shared space

3000 square feet

Fully equipped for microbiology and molecular biology

East Campus Research Building

Recently opened state-of-the-art animal facility on Veterinary campus

Will allow continued and expanded opportunities for animal models of infectious diseases

Animal Health Diagnostic Center Building

Will expand the current world-renowned animal diagnostic laboratory

Will provide biosafety level 3 space to the campus

Breaking ground in Spring of 2008, with anticipated occupancy in 2010

FOOD & WATERBORNE DISEASES INTEGRATED RESEARCH NETWORK

cornell zru abstracts
Cornell ZRU Abstracts

ZC001-03 Transmission of MDR Salmonella

Abstract: “The duration of fecal Salmonella shedding among dairy cattle following clinical disease”

ZC002-03 Molecular Diagnosis of Bacterial Pathogens

Abstract: “Microbial Diagnostic Array Workstation (MDAW): A Web Server for Diagnostic Array Data Storage, Sharing and Analysis”

ZC003-05 Molecular Evolution of Campylobacter Diversity

Abstract: “Evolutionary genomic analysis of the genus Campylobacter”

Abstract: “A phylogenomic and strain genotyping examination of possible host adapted ecotypes in Campylobacter coli”

ZC004-06 The role of host microbiota in enteric disease

Abstract: “Characterization of the Intestinal Environment in Conventional and Streptomycin-Treated Mice”

ZC005-06 C. difficile: Genomics/transciptome study

Abstract: “Comparative genomics of Clostridium difficile isolated from different hosts reveals genetic differences relating to host species”

ZC006-07 Sources and transmission of multidrug-resistant Salmonella strains that cause human infection

Abstract: “Different Clones of Salmonella 4,5,12:I:- Isolates in Different Continents Causing Outbreaks”

Abstract: “Dynamics of infection in small transient populations”

Abstract: “The effect of clinical outbreaks of bovine salmonellosis on fecal shedding of MDR Salmonella”