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Measuring Resolution with Marshmallows Experiment. Why does food cook unevenly in a microwave?. Background. cc by Niels Heidenreich. Microwaves are electromagnetic waves. cc by Lenny222. Microwaves work by causing the water, sugar, and fat in food to absorb energy. Image by Baran Ivo.

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Measuring Resolution with Marshmallows Experiment


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    1. Measuring Resolution with MarshmallowsExperiment

    2. Why does food cook unevenly in a microwave? Background cc by NielsHeidenreich

    3. Microwaves are electromagnetic waves cc by Lenny222

    4. Microwaves work by causing the water, sugar, and fat in food to absorb energy. Image by Baran Ivo

    5. Data Analysis We can determine the frequency of a microwave by measuring the “energy nodes”. We will do this by heating marshmallows. Follow the procedure on your worksheet. Record your results.

    6. Data Analysis Compare the energy antinodes in the marshmallows to the airy patterns and limits of resolution for a light microscope Image from MicroscopyU

    7. On the electromagnetic spectrum chart: Data Analysis cc by Inductiveload • Locate visible energy wavelengths. What is the resolution limit? • 2. Locate microwave energy wavelengths. What is the resolution limit? • 3. What energy source emits nanoscale wavelengths? What measurement resolution is required? • 4. How much smaller are nanoscale wavelengths compared to microwave wavelengths? (ratio) Electromagnetic radiation covers a huge range of wavelengths. Light (the part of the electromagnetic spectrum that we can detect with our eyes) is only a small portion of this range. X-rays, light, and microwaves are all examples of electromagnetic waves.

    8. This module is one of a series designed to introduce faculty and high school students to the basic concepts of nanotechnology. Each module includes a PowerPoint presentation, discussion questions, and hands-on activities, when applicable.The series was funded in part by:The National Science FoundationGrant DUE-0702976and the Oklahoma Nanotechnology Education InitiativeAny opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in the material are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation or the Oklahoma Nanotechnology Education Initiative.

    9. Image CreditsHeidenreich, Neil. (Photographer) Croissant Fatality. Flickr. (www.flickr.com) Microscopy U. (Designer). Airy Patterns and the Limit of Resolution. (www.microscopyu.com) Inductiveload. (Designer). EM Spectrum Properties. Wikimedia Commons. (commons.wikimedia.org) Ivo, Baran. (Photographer). Microwave Oven. Wikimedia Commons. (commons.wikimedia.org)

    10. ReferencesDavidson, Michael. Microscopy Basics: Resolution. Microscopy U. Retrieved from http://www.microscopyu.com/articles/formulas/formulasresolution.htmlGoldman, Martin V. Microwaves [Online Applet Lesson]. Physics 2000. Retrieved from http://www.colorado.edu/physics/2000/index.pl?Page=index.pl?Type=TOCStauffer, Robert H. Finding the Speed of Light with Marshmallows-A Take-Home Lab (1997). The Physics Teacher. Vol. 35, April 1997. p. 231.