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Treason laws: 35 successful cases out of 106 Refused titles imperator (emperor) and pater PowerPoint Presentation
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Tiberius (r. 14-37 AD). Treason laws: 35 successful cases out of 106 Refused titles imperator (emperor) and pater patriae (father of the country) princeps (first man) Increasing power of senate at expense of people Last 11 years of life on Capri.

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slide1

Tiberius (r. 14-37 AD)

Treason laws: 35 successful cases out of 106

Refused titles imperator (emperor) and pater

patriae (father of the country)

princeps (first man)

Increasing power of senate at expense of people

Last 11 years of life on Capri

slide2

Gaius Caligula (“little boot,” r. 37-41 AD)

Co-heir with Gemellus

Caligula (pl. caligulae,

diminutive of caligae)

slide3

Initially gaining popularity among people and

favour of senate

Oct 37 AD Serious illness. Thereafter arranges

deaths of family members and supporters

39 AD Relations with senate have deteriorated,

and Caligula seeking recognition of divine

nature

41 AD Assassinated by members of army,

senate and administration

slide4

Claudius (r. 41-54 AD)

Bribes Praetorian Guard

Initially seeking goodwill of senate

47 and 48 AD Censor, bringing senate under

control

Enlarges amici caesaris (council of advisors)

esp. with freedmen

54 AD Dies, possibly poisoned by Agrippina,

possibly from over-indulging

slide5

Nero (r. 54-68 AD)

Initially guided by others incl. Agrippina,

Seneca. Seeks favour of senate

55 AD Dismisses Pallas, poisons Britannicus

59 AD Has Agrippina killed. Others follow

incl. wife Octavia

62 AD Resumes treason trials

July 64 AD Fire in Rome

slide6

68 AD Galba declared emperor by troops.

Nero gradually abandoned, commits

suicide. End of Julio-Claudian line of

emperors

The Year of the Four Emperors, 68-69 AD:

Galba (68-69 AD)

Otho (69 AD)

Vitellius (69 AD)

Vespasian (69-79 AD)

slide7

Vespasian (r. 69-79 AD)

First Flavian emperor

End 70 AD Completes defeat of supporters of

Vitellius, also conquest of Jerusalem

73 AD Censor, makes changes to senate and

state administration, reforms state

finances

79 AD Dies of fever

slide8

Titus (r. 79-81 AD)

Concerns about wild youth, but becomes

model princeps, keen to promote

welfare of people, loved by subjects

slide9

Domitian (r. 81-96 AD)

Autocratic

Became censor for life

Dominus et deus (Lord and God)

Spending on entertainments, personal

glorification

slide10

Use of treason trials, financing wars with

confiscated property

89 AD Rebellion leads to persecution complex

96 AD Assassinated by Stephanus and others.

End of Flavian dynasty