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Vermont Profile of Adult Learning

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  1. 2010 Vermont Profile of Adult Learning Adults (Age 18 to 64) In Need of Adult Education and Training, 2010 No College Education, Earning Less than a Living Wage • Vermont By the Numbers • 59,166 adults have no college education, are working but living in families with a combined income less than a living wage (twice the level of poverty). • 25,785 working-age adults have not completed high school (or equivalent). • 2,973 adults have no college education and speak English poorly or not at all. • 880 adults have no completed high school, speak English poorly or not at all, and are struggling to earn a living wage. • Therefore, 71,083 have at least one of the basic challenges the state must address – 17.6% of all working-age adults in Vermont. No High School Diploma 59,166 25,785 10,968 13,680 43,462 880 Total: 71,083(17.6% of adults) 257 1,144 2,973 ESL – No College Education, Speaks Little or No English 692 Vermont’s Adult Population Compared to the U.S. and Top States Gaps Between Whites and Minorities* (25 to 44 Year Olds) Adults with No High School Diploma (%) Age 18-24 High School Attainment (Percent) Vermont 2000 Vermont 2000 Vermont 2010 Vermont 2010 United States United States Top 5 States Top 5 States Age 25-64 College Attainment (Percent) Vermont 2000 Vermont 2000 Vermont 2010 Vermont 2010 United States United States Top 5 States Top 5 States Speak English Poorly or Not at All – Age 18 to 64 (%) * Minorities include Hispanic, African-American, and Native American Vermont 2000 Vermont 2010 • Vermont has less adults with no high school diploma than the U.S. average and is a top state in this regard. • Compared to the national average, Vermont has less adults in families not earning a living wage with a high school diploma or less. However, this percentage has increased since 2000. • Vermont is a top state in the percentage of educational gaps between whites and minorities for high school and college attainment. United States Top 5 States High School Diploma or Less in Families not Earning a Living Wage – Age 18 to 64 (%) Vermont 2000 Vermont 2010 United States Top 5 States

  2. Prepared by the National Center forHigher Education Management Systems With Support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 2010 Vermont Profile of Adult Learning Reaching the Target Population Enrollment per 1,000 Adults Age 18-64: College Participation of Adults Age 25-49 as a Percent of Population Age 25-49 with Only a High School Diploma In State-Administered ABE Programs with Less than a High School Diploma Vermont 2001 Vermont 2000 Vermont 2009 Vermont 2010 United States United States Top 5 States Top 5 States In English as a Second Language (ESL) with Little or No English Proficiency • Adult enrollment in state-administered ABE programs is greater than the U.S. average and has improved significantly since 2000. • GEDs awarded in Vermont per 1,000 adults is slightly lower than the national average and has declined since 2000. • The overall college participation rate of adults ages 25-49 is lower than the U.S. average and has declined since 2001. Vermont 2000 Vermont 2010 United States Top 5 States GEDs Awarded per 1,000 Adults with Less than a High School Diploma (Age 18 to 24) Vermont 2000 Vermont 2010 United States Top 5 States The Benefits of More Education Workforce Participation (%) Education Median Annual Earnings (Age 18 to 64) Less than High School • Adults with higher levels of education are more likely to participate in the workforce than adults with less than a college degree. • Additionally, those with a college degree earn substantially more money annually compared to those with less than a college degree. High School Some College Associates Degree Bachelor’s Degree Graduate/Prof. Degree Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey – Public Use Microdata Files, 2000, 2010 Office of Vocational and Adult Education NCES, IPEDS Fall 2000 and 2010 Enrollment Files General Education Development (GED) Testing Service, 2001, 2010