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Swaps

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Swaps

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  1. Swaps

  2. Definitions • In a swap, two counterparties agree to a contractual arrangement where in they agree to exchange cash flows at periodic intervals.

  3. Financial Swaps • A financial swap is an agreement between two parties to exchange cash flows according to a formula • Financial swaps are derivative securities • Currency swaps and interest rate swaps are two types

  4. Currency swaps are mainly used for debt financing in the required currency at a reduced cost due to comparative advantage • Interest rate swaps have become important instruments to match maturities of assets and liabilities and also to obtain cost savings

  5. Types of Swaps • Interest rate swaps • Currency swaps • Foreign exchange swaps • Non-deliverable currency swaps

  6. There are two types of interest rate swaps: • Single currency interest rate swap • “Plain vanilla” fixed-for-floating swaps are often just called interest rate swaps. • Cross-Currency interest rate swap • This is often called a currency swap; fixed for fixed rate debt service in two (or more) currencies.

  7. Interest rate swaps • It is an agreement between two parties to exchange interest payments on a specific notional principal amount for a specific maturity • Notional =theoretical, there is no exchange of principal amount between parties • Principal amount is simply taken as reference amount for computing the interest amount

  8. Users-commercial banks, investment banks , insurance companies, government agencies and trusts • Interest rate swap helps in hedging interest rate risk • Also referred as term structure risk or basis risk

  9. Term structure risk arises on changes in the fixed interest rate term structure • E.g. Fixed or floating rate assets are financed –floating or fixed rate liability

  10. Two types- • Coupon swaps • Basis swaps • Coupon Swaps: is an agreement between two parties in which one party agrees to pay other party- • Cash flow equal to the interest • At a predetermined fixed rate • On a notional principal amount for a certain no.of years

  11. Other party pays the counter party cash flows equal to the interest amount • At a floating rate • On the same notional principal amount for the same period of time

  12. Size of the Swap Market • In 2005 the notational principal of: interest rate swaps was $12,810,736,000,000(12lakh crore. Currency swaps $1,197,395,000,000(1 lakh crore) • The most popular currencies are: • U.S.$ (34%) • ¥ (23%) • DM (11%) • FF (10%) • £ (6%)

  13. The Swap Bank • A swap bank is a generic term to describe a financial institution that facilitates swaps between counterparties. • The swap bank can serve as either a broker or a dealer. • As a broker, the swap bank matches counterparties but does not assume any of the risks of the swap. • As a dealer, the swap bank stands ready to accept either side of a currency swap, and then later lay off their risk, or match it with a counterparty.

  14. An Example of an Interest Rate Swap • Consider this example of a “plain vanilla” interest rate swap. • Bank A is a AAA-rated international bank located in the U.K. who wishes to raise $10,000,000 to finance floating-rate Eurodollar loans. • Bank A is considering issuing 5-year fixed-rate Eurodollar bonds at 10 percent. • It would make more sense for the bank to issue floating-rate notes at LIBOR to finance floating-rate Eurodollar loans.

  15. An Example of an Interest Rate Swap • Firm B is a BBB-rated U.S. company. It needs $10,000,000 to finance an investment with a five-year economic life. • Firm B is considering issuing 5-year fixed-rate Eurodollar bonds at 11.75 percent. • Alternatively, firm B can raise the money by issuing 5-year FRNs at LIBOR + ½ percent. • Firm B would prefer to borrow at a fixed rate.

  16. An Example of an Interest Rate Swap The borrowing opportunities of the two firms are shown in the following table:

  17. The QSD • The Quality Spread Differential represents ---the potential gains from the swap that can be shared between the counterparties and the swap bank. • There is no reason to presume that the gains will be shared equally.

  18. In the above example, company B is less credit-worthy than bank A, • So they probably would have gotten less of the QSD, ---in order to compensate the swap bank for the default risk.

  19. An Example of a Currency Swap • Suppose a U.S. MNC wants to finance a £10,000,000 expansion of a British plant. • They could borrow dollars in the U.S. where they are well known and exchange for dollars for pounds.

  20. This will give them exchange rate risk: financing a sterling project with dollars. • They could borrow pounds in the international bond market, but • Pay a lot since they are not as well known abroad.

  21. An Example of a Currency Swap • If they can find a British MNC with a mirror-image financing need they may both benefit from a swap. • If the exchange rate is S0($/£) = $1.60/£, the U.S. firm needs to find a British firm wanting to finance dollar borrowing in the amount of $16,000,000.

  22. An Example of a Currency Swap Consider two firms A and B: firm A is a U.S.–based multinational and firm B is a U.K.–based multinational. Both firms wish to finance a project in each other’s country of the same size. Their borrowing opportunities are given in the table below.

  23. An Example of a Currency Swap Swap Bank $9.4% $8% £12% £11% Company B Company A £12% $8%

  24. An Example of a Currency Swap Swap Bank $9.4% $8% £12% £11% Company B Company A £12% $8% A’s net position is to borrow at £11% A saves £.6%

  25. An Example of a Currency Swap Swap Bank $9.4% $8% £12% £11% Company B Company A £12% $8% B’s net position is to borrow at $9.4% B saves $.6%

  26. Comparative Advantage as the Basis for Swaps A is the more credit-worthy of the two firms. A pays 2% less to borrow in dollars than B A pays .4% less to borrow in pounds than B: A has a comparative advantage in borrowing in dollars. B has a comparative advantage in borrowing in pounds.

  27. Comparative Advantage as the Basis for Swaps B has a comparative advantage in borrowing in £. B pays 2% more to borrow in dollars than A B pays only .4% more to borrow in pounds than A:

  28. Comparative Advantage as the Basis for Swaps A has a comparative advantage in borrowing in dollars. B has a comparative advantage in borrowing in pounds. If they borrow according to their comparative advantage and then swap, there will be gains for both parties.

  29. Swap Market Quotations • They make a market in “plain vanilla” swaps and provide quotes for these. • Since the swap banks are dealers for these swaps, there is a bid-ask spread. • For example, 6.60 — 6.85 means the swap bank will pay fixed-rate DM payments at 6.60% against receiving dollar LIBOR or it will receive fixed-rate DM payments at 6.85% against receiving dollar LIBOR.

  30. Variations of Basic Currency and Interest Rate Swaps • Currency Swaps • fixed for fixed • fixed for floating • floating for floating • amortizing • Interest Rate Swaps • zero-for floating • floating for floating • For a swap to be possible, a QSD must exist. Beyond that, creativity is the only limit.

  31. Risks of Interest Rate and Currency Swaps • Interest Rate Risk • Interest rates might move against the swap bank after it has only half of a swap on the books, or if it has an un hedged position. • Basis Risk • If the floating rates of the two counterparties are not pegged to the same index. • Exchange rate Risk • In the example of a currency swap given earlier, the swap bank would be worse off if the pound appreciated.

  32. Risks of Interest Rate and Currency Swaps (continued) • Credit Risk • This is the major risk faced by a swap dealer—the risk that a counter party will default on its end of the swap. • Mismatch Risk • It’s hard to find a counterparty that wants to borrow the right amount of money for the right amount of time. • Sovereign Risk • The risk that a country will impose exchange rate restrictions that will interfere with performance on the swap.

  33. Pricing a Swap • A swap is a derivative security so it can be priced in terms of the underlying assets: • How to: • Plain vanilla fixed for floating swap gets valued just like a bond. • Currency swap gets valued just like a nest of currency futures.