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Welcome to the Museum of Japan. Museum Entrance. Military History. Clothing. Currency. Food. Curator’s Offices. Curator’s Office. Mikayla Beauchamp.

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Presentation Transcript
museum entrance

Welcome to the Museum of Japan

Museum Entrance

Military History

Clothing

Currency

Food

Curator’s

Offices

curator s office
Curator’s Office

Mikayla Beauchamp

HEY! :) My name is Mikayla and I am currently a junior at ESU. I am 21 (didn't have my first alcoholic drink til I turned 21!) I am majoring in Elementary Education, potentially with a minor in Science Education. My favorite person in the world ever of all time is only about 6 months old and his name is Nikolas (he's my nephew). My favorite color is neon pink because it's really BRIGHT! Call of Duty: Black Ops is my favorite video game and I’ve been so excited about Black Ops II!

Place your picture here.

mbeauch1@g.emporia.edu

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Note: Virtual museums were first introduced by educators at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. This template was designed by Dr. Christy Keeler. View the Educational Virtual Museums website for more information on this instructional technique.

room 1

White Rice

Room 1

Artifact

2

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Entry

room 2

Kimono

Room 2

Artifact

6

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room 3

Samurai

Room 3

Artifact

10

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room 4

The Yen

Room 4

Artifact

14

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white rice
White Rice

White rice, embryo rice, brown rice

Traditionally, rice is eaten at every meal in Japan and considered a staple food in the country. However, it has multiple uses in the kitchen. Plain rice, cooked rice, fried rice, a meal on its own, rice with green tea and in sushi are just a few different examples. Along with different types of preparations of rice, there are two different types of rice: white rice and brown rice. In fact, white rice is simply brown rice that has been “polished”, illustrated in the picture.

White Rice

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kimono
Kimono

Japanese kimonos are wrapped around the body, sometimes in several layers, and are secured in place by sashes with a wide obi to complete the look. For women, there are six different types of kimono’s that she can wear depending on what event she is going to and her marital status. Not only different styles, but she can choose from different colors depending on the season. However, kimono’s are quickly fading from everyday life and leaning more towards to only for special occasions.

Kimono's

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the samurai
The Samurai

Honor was so important to the Samurai that a disgraced samurai could regain his honor by passing into death. Their weapons included: Japanese swords, longbows, pole weapons, matchlocks, cannons, katanas, clubs and chain weapons were popular weapons in the days of the Samurai. There were even Samurai women in charge of the households of the Samurai men. Traits valued in women of the samurai class were humility, obedience, self-control, strength, and loyalty.Even today, Samurai are still around; samurai teachings can still be found today in both everyday life and in modern Japanese martial arts.

Samurai

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the yen
The Yen

The Yen is the official currency of Japan. It is currently the third most traded currency, only behind the dollar and the euro. “Yen” actually means “round object”, only half fitting because Japan still uses bills for their bigger currencies. The 1 yen coin is made out of 100% aluminum and can float on water if placed correctly. In fact, they designed the coins so that even people with visual impairments could distinguish the coins apart. Smooth edges compared to reeded edges, holes in the middle or not, and how heavy a coin is combined can help a person to know which coin is in their hands.

One Yen Coin

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map of japan
Map of Japan

Map of Japan

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This is a map of Japan and its major cities.