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Jeopardy!. Review Game. Second Round. Q: Literary Terms: $200. The main character of a story. A: Literary Terms: $200. Who is the protagonist?. Q: Literary Terms: $400. A struggle that occurs within the character. . A: Literary Terms: $400. What is internal conflict (or man vs. self)?.

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Jeopardy!


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jeopardy

Jeopardy!

Review Game

q literary terms 200
Q: Literary Terms: $200
  • The main character of a story
a literary terms 200
A: Literary Terms: $200
  • Who is the protagonist?
q literary terms 400
Q: Literary Terms: $400
  • A struggle that occurs within the character.
a literary terms 400
A: Literary Terms: $400
  • What is internal conflict (or man vs. self)?
q literary terms 600
Q: Literary Terms: $600
  • The discrepancy between what you expect to happen and what actually happens.
q literary terms 800
Q: Literary Terms: $800
  • Hints at was is to come later in the story.
a literary terms 800
A: Literary Terms: $800
  • What is foreshadowing?
q literary terms 1000
Q: Literary Terms: $1000
  • The part of the plot in which the reader is introduced to the characters, setting, and basic background of the story.
a literary terms 1000
A: Literary Terms: $1000
  • What is the exposition?
q odyssey 200
Q: Odyssey: $200
  • Odysseus’ dog
a odyssey 200
A: Odyssey: $200
  • Who is Argus?
q odyssey 400
Q: Odyssey: $400
  • Odysseus is disguised as this.
a odyssey 400
A: Odyssey: $400
  • Who is a beggar?
q odyssey 600
Q: Odyssey: $600
  • Odysseus kills this suitor first.
a odyssey 600
A: Odyssey: $600
  • Who is Antinous?
q odyssey 800
Q: Odyssey: $800
  • The challenge Penelope proposes to the suitors.
a odyssey 800
A: Odyssey: $800
  • What is to string Odysseus’ bow and to shoot an arrow through twelve axe handle sockets?
q odyssey 1000
Q: Odyssey: $1000
  • Represents Odysseus and Penelope’s unshakeable love.
a odyssey 1000
A: Odyssey: $1000
  • What is their marriage bed?
q mythology 200
Q: Mythology: $200
  • This goddess was born from Zeus’ forehead.
a mythology 200
A: Mythology: $200
  • Who is Athena?
q mythology 400
Q: Mythology: $400
  • The messenger god.
a mythology 400
A: Mythology: $400
  • Who is Hermes?
q mythology 600
Q: Mythology: $600
  • This god rules over the underworld
a mythology 600
A: Mythology: $600
  • Who is Hades?
q mythology 800
Q: Mythology: $800
  • Poseidon’s gift to the city of Athens
a mythology 800
A: Mythology: $800
  • What is a spring of salt water?
q mythology 1000
Q: Mythology: $1000
  • She thought she was better than the gods and was turned into a spider as punishment.
a mythology 1000
A: Mythology: $1000
  • Who is Arachne?
q grammar 200
Q: Grammar: $200
  • A person, place, thing, or idea.
a grammar 200
A: Grammar: $200
  • What is a noun?
q grammar 400
Q: Grammar: $400
  • A word that describes (modifies) a noun.
a grammar 400
A: Grammar: $400
  • What is an adjective?
q grammar 600
Q: Grammar: $600
  • Identify the underlined word
  • The girl ran down the hallway.
a grammar 600
A: Grammar: $600
  • What is a verb?
q grammar 800
Q: Grammar: $800
  • A prepositional phrase always includes this.
a grammar 800
A: Grammar: $800
  • A preposition and a noun
q grammar 1000
Q: Grammar: $1000
  • Slowly the boy with the blue baseball cap.
a grammar 1000
A: Grammar: $1000
  • What is a fragment?
q poetic devices 200
Q: Poetic Devices: $200
  • He ran as fast as the wind.
a poetic devices 200
A: Poetic Devices: $200
  • What is a simile?
q poetic devices 400
Q: Poetic Devices: $400
  • A buzzing bee flew by me.
a poetic devices 400
A: Poetic Devices: $400
  • What is onomatopoeia?
q poetic devices 600
Q: Poetic Devices: $600
  • The moon winked at me through the clouds above.
a poetic devices 600
A: Poetic Devices: $600
  • What is personification?
q poetic devices 800
Q: Poetic Devices: $800
  • Yarvis yanked you at yoga, and Yvonne yelled.
a poetic devices 800
A: Poetic Devices: $800
  • What is alliteration?
q poetic devices 1000
Q: Poetic Devices: $1000
  • “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day”
a poetic devices 1000
A: Poetic Devices: $1000
  • What is a metaphor?
q text structure 400
Q: Text Structure: $400

Attendance

  • Having good attendance is important because attendance determines the school’s funding. Some students have poor attendance, and the school has tried many ways of addressing this: teachers have talked to parents on the phone and the school has mailed letters. Yet, some students still maintain poor attendance. Next, the staff will attempt to schedule parent/teacher/administrator conferences with students who are habitually absent. Hopefully, this will help more students get to school everyday.
a text structure 400
A: Text Structure: $400
  • What is problem and solution?
q text structure 800
Q: Text Structure: $800

Milestones

  • In 1821 the first public high school in the United States was started in Boston. By 1900, 31 states required children to attend school from the ages of 8 to 14. As a result, by 1910 72 percent of American children attended school. Half the nation's children attended one-room schools. In 1918, every state required students to complete elementary school. In 1954, the Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education unanimously declared that separate facilities were unconstitutional and desegregation began.
a text structure 800
A: Text Structure: $800
  • What is chronological?
q text structure 1200
Q: Text Structure: $1200

Have a Great Day

  • There is more than one way to have a successful school day, but a great way is to be well prepared. The first thing you should do is complete your homework the night before. Don’t try to do your work in the morning, it will be too stressful and you may not have enough time. Next, you need to go to bed at a reasonable time. If you stay up too late, you will not be able to focus on assignments or instruction as well and you may even fall asleep during class. Lastly, you should wake up early. This will give you time to get ready and feel good about yourself, and you’ll also be able to get something to eat before the day begins. So remember, one way to have a successful school day is to do your homework the night before, go to bed early, and wake up early. Have a great day.
a text structure 1200
A: Text Structure: $1200
  • What is sequence?
q text structure 1600
Q: Text Structure: $1600

Are Charter Schools Harder Schools?

  • These days, students and their caretakers have more choices when it comes to selecting a public school. In addition to the traditional neighborhood schools, Charter schools have popped up in major cities across the country. Both charter schools and neighborhood schools fill traditional roles like providing instruction, serving lunch and other meals, and administering the state tests. But charter schools and neighborhood schools differ in many important ways. One key difference is the amount of time students spend in school. In Chicago, students who attend neighborhood schools do so for around 180 days in a year, and each day is slightly over six hours long. On the contrary, students who attend charter schools do so for around 200 days in a year, and most charter school days are over eight hours long. While both neighborhood and charter schools provide free public education to students meeting enrollment criteria, students who attend charter schools spend much more time in class.
a text structure 1600
A: Text Structure: $1600
  • What is compare and contrast?
q text structure 2000
Q: Text Structure: $2000

Why Do We Have Schools?

  • Education in our society serves many purposes, but there are three main functions. First, students learn skills that will help prepare them for society. Writing, reading, and mathematics are essential in today’s workplace and many people learn these skills in school. Second, schools serve communities. Whether by functioning as polling locations during elections, or providing safe havens for students in temporary living situations, public schools add value to communities. Third, public schools provide a structured environment for children to engage in productive activities during many days of the year while their adult caretakers may be working. In other words, public schools also provide day care. These are three of the primary reasons why we have schools in our society.
a text structure 2000
A: Text Structure: $2000
  • What is cause and effect?
q levels of questioning 400
Q: Levels of Questioning $400
  • Whose house does Snow White stumble upon?
a levels of questioning 400
A: Levels of Questioning $400
  • What is a level 1 question?
q levels of questioning 800
Q: Levels of Questioning $800
  • What poisonous fruit does Snow White take a bite of?
a levels of questioning 800
A: Levels of Questioning $800
  • What is a level 1 question?
q levels of questioning 1200
Q: Levels of Questioning $1200
  • Compare and contrast Snow White to her evil stepmother.
a levels of questioning 1200
A: Levels of Questioning $1200
  • What is a level 2 question?
q levels of questioning 1600
Q: Levels of Questioning $1600
  • Does good always overcome evil?
a levels of questioning 1600
A: Levels of Questioning $1600
  • What is a level 3 question?
q levels of questioning 2000
Q: Levels of Questioning $2000
  • What does it mean to live happily ever after?
a levels of questioning 2000
A: Levels of Questioning $2000
  • What is a level 3 question?
q author s purpose 400
Q: Author’s Purpose $400
  • A pamphlet urging people to not eat animals or use products made from animals or animal suffering because the author thinks that is cruel and unnecessary.
a author s purpose 400
A: Author’s Purpose $400
  • What is to persuade?
q author s purpose 800
Q: Author’s Purpose $800
  • A book of over 1,000 knock-knock jokes.
a author s purpose 800
A: Author’s Purpose $800
  • What is to entertain?
q author s purpose 1200
Q: Author’s Purpose $1200
  • A cook book containing recipes for making cakes, cookies, and other desserts.
a author s purpose 1200
A: Author’s Purpose $1200
  • What is to inform?
q author s purpose 1600
Q: Author’s Purpose $1600
  • A poem about a “packrat,” a person who refuses to throw away things, even things that most people would consider garbage.
a author s purpose 1600
A: Author’s Purpose $1600
  • What is to entertain?
q author s purpose 2000
Q: Author’s Purpose $2000
  • A politician’s speech about how homes should be provided to families who cannot afford them.
a author s purpose 2000
A: Author’s Purpose $2000
  • What is to persuade?
q point of view 400
Q: Point of View $400
  • Several people have made a lasting impression on me. I remember one person in particular who was significant to me. Mr. Smith, my high school English teacher, helped my family and me through a difficult time during my junior year. We appreciated his care, kindness, and financial help after the loss of our home in a devastating fire.
a point of view 400
A: Point of View $400
  • What is first person?
q point of view 800
Q: Point of View $800
  • Kathy and Therese are very talented. Kathy thought to herself, “I have a beautiful singing voice.” Her teachers are always asking her to sing at assemblies or in school musicals. Therese doesn’t have a good singing voice, but she is an amazing athlete. Therese thought to herself, “I am always the fastest runner in my class and can easily hit homeruns when I play baseball.” Both girls were very proud of their talents.
a point of view 800
A: Point of View $800
  • What is 3rd person omniscient?
q point of view 1200
Q: Point of View $1200
  • Ricardo sat in his classroom listening to the rain hit the roof and watching the puddles in the playground grow larger and larger. Boy was he glad that he brought his umbrella to school! He knew his class wouldn’t go out to play at lunch time, which disappointed him.
a point of view 1200
A: Point of View $1200
  • What is 3rd person limited?
q point of view 1600
Q: Point of View $1600
  • I love winter. It is definitely my favorite time of year. There is something about snow that just makes me feel like smiling. I love how beautiful everything looks after a snowfall.
a point of view 1600
A: Point of View $1600
  • What is first person?
q point of view 2000
Q: Point of View $2000
  • Jeff wrapped his arms around himself and leaned into the wind as he ran. He was wearing a heavy winter coat, a hat, scarf, and gloves, but he was still shivering from the cold. He rubbed his arms as he ran down the street.
a point of view 2000
A: Point of View $2000
  • What is 3rd person limited?
q types of irony 400
Q: Types of Irony $400
  • Have you ever seen a horror movie that has a killer on the loose? You, and the rest of the audience, know that the teenagers should not go walking in the woods late at night, but they think a midnight stroll would be romantic. Needless to say, the teens become the next victims.
a types of irony 400
A: Types of Irony $400
  • What is dramatic irony?
q types of irony 800
Q: Types of Irony $800
  • A person Tweets about how Twitter is a waste of time and energy.
a types of irony 800
A: Types of Irony $800
  • What is situational irony?
q types of irony 1200
Q: Types of Irony $1200
  • Mother: “I see you ironed your shirt.”
  • Boy: “But I just dug it out of the bottom of the hamper.”
a types of irony 1200
A: Types of Irony $1200
  • What is verbal irony?
q types of irony 1600
Q: Types of Irony $1600
  • A thief’s house was broken into at the same time he was robbing someone’s house.
a types of irony 1600
A: Types of Irony $1600
  • What is situational irony?
q types of irony 2000
Q: Types of Irony $2000
  • If you have a phobia of long words, you must tell people that you are Hippopotomonstrosesquipedaliophobic.
a types of irony 2000
A: Types of Irony $2000
  • What is situational irony?
final jeopardy
Final Jeopardy!
  • The category is The Odyssey
  • Place your bets!
the odyssey
The Odyssey
  • What is the theme of The Odyssey?
  • You MUST provide three examples from the test to support your answer to get this question correct.