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  1. Australian English David González Planelles Ana Pérez Torregrosa Pablo Antón Escudero Germán Asencio Antón

  2. I n d e x • Brief History of Australian English • Influences on Australian English • Pronunciation & Spelling • Grammar • Vocabulary

  3. Darwin Northern Territory Queensland Western Australia Brisbane South Australia New South Wales Sydney Perth Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Adelaide Canberra Victoria Melbourne Tasmania Hobart

  4. 1. Brief History of Australian English ETIMOLOGY • Latin “Australis” - Southern • La Tierra Austral del Espíritu Santo - Pedro Fernandes de Queirós - House of Austria

  5. The original inhabitants: Aboriginal tribes who arrived in Australia approx. 40,000 to 60,000 years ago. • 2 main indigenous ethnicities of Australia - Australian Aborigines and Torres Strait Islander

  6. 1788 - British Settlement - Colony of New South Wales - Captain James Cook • First Fleet (11 ships) – Botany Bay (Sidney)

  7. CONVICTS Australian Penal colonies (petty offences: larceny - Large number of Irish)

  8. First Speakers: the native-born children of the colony • Children born in New South Wales • Exposed to different dialects from all over the British Isles, (Ireland and South East England) • 1820 Recognition of Australian English as different from British English • 1901 Federation of Australia - 6 British colonies formed 1 nation • English: no official status, but de facto official language and 1st language used

  9. 2. Influences on Australian English British English: 1850: 1st Australian Gold Rush – Wave of immigration (2% of population of UK – Irish convicts)

  10. Aboriginal languages: 27 language families

  11. Torres Strait islands languages: Western-Central and Eastern Names of places (cities, suburbs), flora, fauna. Ex: Canberra = meeting place

  12. American English - introduction of words, spellings, terms and usage • 19th c. Gold Rush - dirt and digger • World War II - okay, youguys and gee • TV and Media

  13. 3. Pronunciation & Spelling STANDARD AUSTRALIAN ENGLISH • Most people raised in Australia • Broadness continuum 1965 • Broad (34%) • General (55%) The rain in Spain falls mainly on the plain • Cultivated (11%) * The general category is increasing at the expense of broad and cultivated • Dominant variety, but not the only one: • Aboriginal English • Various ethno-cultural AusE dialects (e.g. Lebspeak)

  14. CONSONANTS • Non-rhotic, linking /r/ e.g. car, there are • Glottal stop (ʔ) e.g. kitten, department • Intervocalic /t/ as a flap /d/ e.g. written, got it • I-glide (/j/ sound) between some consonants and /u/ e.g. /nju:z/ (news) • VOWELS • Long /a:/ coexists with /æ/ e.g. half, arm, father •  /a:/ more prestigious • Schwa rather than /ɪ/ e.g. naked, acid • /æ/ sound  /e/ e.g. I love that hat (ðet het) • /i:/ rather than /ɪ/ e.g. very, many, happy

  15. DIPHTONGS • /aɪ/  /ɔɪ/ e.g. right, life, sign • /eɪ/ tends to /aɪ/ e.g. no way, say • Dry sound (Cockney) • Twangy sounds + rising inflection or high-rising terminal (Australian English)

  16. No official regulator of correct spelling and grammar  MacQuarie Dictionary • AusEng spelling similar to British English... • * “ou” retained: honour, favour • * “-re” instead of “-er”: theatre, metre, litre • * “-ise” more frequent: organise, realise • ... BUT THERE IS A TENDENCYTOWARDSAMERICAN SIMPLIFICATION • * Australian Labor Party • * program (programme) • * analog (analogue) • * -ize coexists • * No Latin/Greek diphthongs: encyclopedia (encyclopaedia) • diarrhea (diarrhoea)

  17. ANDY: HEAR YE, HEAR YE. THIS SESSION WILL NOW COME TO ORDER. WITH THE COOPERATION OF THE US DEPARTMENT OF STATE, WE HAVE PRESENT TODAY ONE BART SIMPSON. I BELIEVE HE HAS SOMETHING TO SAY. BART? BART: I'M SORRY. I'M SORRY FOR WHAT I DID TO YOUR COUNTRY. ANDY: WELL, YOU'RE FREE TO GO, BART... RIGHT AFTER YOUR__ADDITIONAL PUNISHMENT. HOMER: PUNISHMENT? ANDY: WELL, A MERE__APOLOGY WOULD BE A BIT EMPTY, EH? LET THE BOOTING BEGIN. HOMER: BOOTING? ANDY: AW, IT'S JUST A LITTLE KICK IN THE BUM.

  18. 5. Grammar • Collective nouns concord in singular • E.g.: The team is winning. • “Different from / to” rather than “different than” • E.g.: My car is different from yours. • Present Perfect  Simple Past • E.g.: He has played for us last year • Usedn’t to • E.g.: He usedn’t to go to Church everyday. • May = might/could • E.g.: If we found out who caused the problem, we may solve it. • Mustn’t = can’t • E.g.: He mustn’t have wanted the money.

  19. 4. Australian Vocabulary A B O R I G I N A L Kangaroo Koala Wombat Emu CurrawongkookaburraGalah bindieyecalomboboreebanksiaquandongmallee boomerangcorroboree: dancejackeroo: farm manager Other words 1/3 A NEW REALITY HAD TO BE DESCRIBED

  20. amber quids chook durry frock daks NON-ABORIGINAL bloke sheila stove dunny crook spell roo

  21. UNIQUE SET OF DIMINUTIVES abo (aborigine)arvo (afternoon)bizzo (business)doco (documentary) -o Aussie (Australian) brekkie (breakfast) barbie (barbeque) Chrissie (Christmas) -ie lippy (lipstick) exy (expensive) surfy (surfing fanatic) -y

  22. AUSSIE SLANG g’day mate! (hello friend) How ya going? (how are you?) Ace, ta! (Very good, thanks!) It’s been yonks (long time no see) Too right! (definitely!) Catch ya later! (see you later!) Cheers! (goodbye!)

  23. Identify in the following video the 5 words of Australian English which are the same in British English and that we already saw in the Am. Eng. vs Br. Eng. Exercise we did a few weeks ago. ACTIVITY

  24. ANSWERS • Diaper • Sidewalk • Parking lot • Sweater • Shopping cart Nappy Footpath Car park Jumper Trolley

  25. Hooroo! (goodbye!)