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An Itchy Twitchy Friend That Lives Within…. Group 5 Case Study 3 Kellie Knabe, Jill Odom, Shelley Simpson.

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an itchy twitchy friend that lives within

An Itchy Twitchy Friend That Lives Within…

Group 5

Case Study 3

Kellie Knabe, Jill Odom,

Shelley Simpson

slide2
A 24-year-old woman is referred to a public health clinic as a result of contact tracing from a case of gonorrhea. She recently had unprotected sex with her infected male partner but showed no symptoms. A pelvic examination recovers a greenish discharge containing protozoa with a characteristic “jerky” motility. The women tested negative for gonorrhea.
differential diagnosis and causes
Differential Diagnosis and Causes
  • Differential Diagnosis: Trichomoniasis
  • Possible Causes: Multiple sex partners, having unprotected sex, wet linens
probable etiological agents
Probable Etiological Agents
  • Trichomonas vaginalis
  • Neisseria gonorrhea
  • Chlamydia trachomatis
  • Gardnerella vaginalis
  • Candida albicans (yeast infection)
  • Foreign bodies (tampons, IUD’s, condoms)
further information needed for diagnosis
Further Information Needed for Diagnosis
  • Thorough patient history including sexual history
  • Physical examination
  • Serology
  • Urinalysis
  • CBC
  • HIV test
most likely etiological agent
Most Likely Etiological Agent
  • Single-celled protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis, which was obtained by a wet mount showing a protozoa with a jerky motility
what is wrong with patient
What is Wrong With Patient?
  • Trichomoniasis infection
  • Most common curable STD in young, sexually active women
  • 7.4 cases occur each year
symptoms in men
Symptoms in Men
  • Typically asymptomatic, but if symptoms do appear:
  • Discharge from urethra
  • Urge to urinate
  • Burning sensation after urinating or ejaculation
symptoms in women
Symptoms in Women
  • Frothy green discharge with fishy smell from the vagina
  • Vaginal itching and irritation
  • Painful sexual intercourse
  • Lower abdominal pain
  • Burning sensation after urinating
suggested treatment
Suggested Treatment
  • Single dose 2 gm Metronidazole or 500 mg Metronidazole PO bid for seven days
  • If resistant to Metronidazole:
  • Single dose 2 gm Tinidazole
  • Treat male partner with single dose 2 gm Metronidazole
  • Avoid sexual intercourse until treatment is completed
  • Practice safe sex
works cited
Works Cited
  • Gilbert, M.D., David, et al. The Sanford Guide to Antimicrobial Therapy 2006. 36th ed. Sperryville: Antimicrobial Therapy, Inc., 2006.
  • “Sexually Transmitted Infections: Trichomoniasis”. Sexuality and U. 5 September 2006. 16 October 2006 http://www.sexualityandu.ca/teens/sti-1-7.aspx.
works cited1
Works Cited
  • “Trichomonas Infection”. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. 9 September 2004. 17 October 2006. http://www.cdc.gov/nicdod/dpd/parasites/trichomonas/2004_PDF_trichomonas.pdf.
  • “Trichomonas”. Center for Disease Control. May 2004. 18 October 2006. http://www.cdc.gov/std/trichomonas/STDFact-Trichomonas.htm.
works cited2
Works Cited
  • “Trichomonas vaginalis”. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. 2 May 2002. 18 October 2006. http://www.dpd.cdc.gov/DPDx/HTML/ImageLibrary/Trichomonas.