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U.S. Policy on Missile Defense. 7 APRIL 2005 Presentation for the National Defense Industrial Forum Phil Jamison Office of Missile Defense Policy. Security Environment. More diverse, unfamiliar, threats (e.g., regional opponents, proliferation of WMD, terrorism) Surprise likely

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u s policy on missile defense

U.S. Policy on Missile Defense

7 APRIL 2005

Presentation for the

National Defense Industrial Forum

Phil Jamison

Office of Missile Defense Policy

security environment
Security Environment
  • More diverse, unfamiliar, threats (e.g., regional opponents, proliferation of WMD, terrorism)
    • Surprise likely
    • Deterrence unpredictable
  • Risks of unexpected crisis and conflicts involving one or a combination of adversaries
    • Offense alone inadequate for deterrence
    • Need mix of offense and defense
  • Range of options required to counter threats
missile defense and us defense goals
Missile Defense and US Defense Goals
  • Assure allies and friends that US will not be coerced by missile threats
  • Dissuade potential adversaries from investing in ballistic missiles
  • Deter ballistic missile use by denying benefits of any attack
  • Defend against ballistic missiles should deterrence fail
u s defense strategy
U.S. Defense Strategy
  • Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR)
    • Shifts defense strategy to a capabilities-based approach
    • Focus more on how an adversary may fight and the means it might use rather than who adversary might be
  • Nuclear Posture Review (NPR)
    • Major change in our approach to the role nuclear offensive play in U.S. defense posture
    • Established a “New Triad” composed of:
      • Offensive strike systems (both nuclear and non-nuclear)
      • Missile defenses
      • Revitalized defense infrastructure to provide new capabilities in a timely fashion
    • Addition of missile defenses means U.S. no longer as heavily dependent on nuclear forces
tools for combating wmd
Tools for Combating WMD
  • Counterproliferation
  • Interdiction
  • Deterrence
  • Defense & Mitigation
    • Strike
    • Missile Defense
    • Passive Defense
  • Nonproliferation
  • Diplomacy
  • Multilateral Regimes
  • Threat Reduction Cooperation
  • Nuclear Material Controls
  • Export Controls
  • Sanctions
  • Consequence Management
  • Respond to effects of WMD use against forces and population
  • MD is part of a broad, interlocking WMD Strategy
  • All pillars multilateral, complimentary – including MD
initial missile defense plan
Initial Missile Defense Plan

2005

2004

2006-2008

Initial Missile Defense Capability Against North Korea Late 2004

Enhanced Capability:

Add Defense Against

Mideast Threat Late 2005

Additional Defensive Layer

  • 10 Ground-Based Interceptors (Alaska and California)
  • Upgrade Existing Ground-Based Radar in Alaska
  • Integrate Existing Sea-Based Radars
  • Add 10 Ground-based Interceptors (Alaska)
  • Upgrade Existing Radar in UK
  • Add Moveable Sea-Based Radar
  • Initial Airborne Laser Available
  • Add 20 Ground-BasedInterceptors (New Site)
  • Add Sea, Air or Ground Boost-Phase Interceptors (About 2008)
  • Upgrade Existing Radar in Greenland
  • Add New Forward Deployed Radars

Long-range Threat

Shorter-range Threat

Capabilities Against Shorter-Range Missile Threat

  • Continue Deployment of Ground-Based Interceptors
  • Initial 5 Emergency Sea-Based Interceptors
  • Add 10-20 Sea-Based Interceptors
  • Add More Sea-Based Interceptors
  • Add More Capable Ground-Based Interceptors
responding to guidance
Responding To Guidance
  • Evolutionary Missile Defense Plan I: Field an initial increment of missile defense capability (2004-2005)
    • Initial protection of entire U.S. from North Korea
    • Partial protection of the U.S. from Middle East threat
    • Protection of deployed forces, allies and friends
  • Evolutionary Missile Defense Plan II: Field next increment of missile defense capability (2006-2007)
    • Complete protection of U.S. from Middle East
    • Expand coverage to allies and friends
    • Increase countermeasure resistance, and increase capability against shorter-range threats
responding to guidance cont d
Responding To Guidance (cont’d)
  • Field modest missile defense capabilities in 2004-05
    • Up to 20 Ground-based midcourse interceptors

(current8; planned through 2005 ~ 18 GBIs)

    • Up to 20 Sea-based interceptors

(current4; planned through 2005 ~ 8 SM-3s)

    • AEGIS ships upgraded for missile defense

(current2; planned through 2005 ~ 10 S&T Destroyers; 2 Engagement Cruisers)

    • Continued deployment of Patriot PAC-3 units

(current ~200; planned through 2005 ~ 280 PAC-3s)

    • Forward-based sensors

(current2 -- Cobra Dane/Beale; by adding Fylingdales in 2005 – 3)

  • Evolutionary; add capability as threat and technology develop
  • Continue Research, Development and Testing
  • Seek cooperation with allies and friends

National Security Presidential Directive 23 (December 17, 2002)

implementation of evolutionary missile defense block 2004 and 2006 approved and funded
Implementation Of Evolutionary Missile Defense Block 2004 And 2006 – Approved And Funded

2007

2005

Full Protection Against Mid-East

Expand Coverage to Allies & Friends

Expand Coverage of Deployed Forces

Initial Protection vs North Korea

Partial Coverage vs Mid-East

Protect Deployed Forces

Fixed Site Interceptors

  • 16 Ground-Based Interceptors, Alaska
  • 2 Ground-Based Interceptors, California
  • Up to 26 Ground-Based Interceptors, Alaska
  • 2 Ground-Based Interceptors, California
  • Cobra Dane Radar, Alaska
  • Beale Radar, California
  • Fylingdales Radar, United Kingdom
  • 1 Sea-Based X-Band Radar, Alaska
  • 1 Forward-Based X-Band Radar, East Asia
  • 10 Aegis Search & Track Destroyers
  • Cobra Dane Radar, Alaska
  • Beale Radar, California
  • Fylingdales Radar, United Kingdom
  • Thule Radar, Greenland
  • 1 Sea-Based X-Band Radar, Alaska
  • 2 Forward-Based X-Band Radars
  • 6 Aegis Search & Track Destroyers

Fixed Site Sensors

Mobile / Transportable Sensors

  • 3 Aegis Engagement Cruisers*
  • 8 Aegis Engagement Destroyers*
  • 28 Standard Missile-3s**
  • 2 Aegis Engagement Cruisers*
  • 8 Standard Missile-3s**

Mobile Interceptors

  • 512 Patriot PAC-3
  • 281 Patriot PAC-3

* Engagement ships can perform Search & Track Function

** Planned deliveries

proposed missile defense plan iii blocks 2008 and 2010
Proposed Missile Defense Plan III Blocks 2008 And 2010

2009

2011

Keep Pace With Threat

Begin Addressing Asymmetric and Unconventional Attacks

Increase Capability Against All Threats

Keep Pace With Threat

Continue Addressing Asymmetric and Unconventional Attacks

Increase Capability Against All Threats

  • Up to 36 Ground-Based Interceptors, Alaska
  • 2 Ground-Based Interceptors, California
  • 36 Ground-Based Interceptors, Alaska
  • 2 Ground-Based Interceptors, California
  • 2 Ground-Based Interceptors, Europe

Fixed Site Interceptors

  • Cobra Dane Radar, Alaska
  • Beale Radar, California
  • Fylingdales Radar, United Kingdom
  • Thule Radar, Greenland
  • Otis Radar, Massachusetts
  • Eglin Radar, Florida
  • Clear Radar, Alaska
  • 1 Sea-Based X-Band Radar, Alaska
  • 3 Forward-Based X-Band Radars, East Asia (1)Europe (1), Caucasus (1)
  • 2 Discrimination X-Band Radar
  • Partial Space Tracking & Surveil Satellites
  • Cobra Dane Radar, Alaska
  • Beale Radar, California
  • Fylingdales Radar, United Kingdom
  • Thule Radar, Greenland
  • Otis Radar, Massachusetts
  • Eglin Radar, Florida
  • 1 Sea-Based X-Band Radar, Alaska
  • 3 Forward-Based X-Band Radars, East Asia (1) Europe (1), Caucasus (1)
  • 1 Discrimination X-Band Radar
  • Initial Space Tracking & Surveil Satellites

Fixed Site Sensors

Mobile / Transportable Sensors

  • 3 Aegis Engagement Cruisers
  • 15 Aegis Engagement Destroyers
  • 72 Standard Missile-3s*
  • 24 Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Missiles
  • 712 Patriot PAC-3
  • 3 Aegis Engagement Cruisers
  • 15 Aegis Engagement Destroyers
  • 101 Standard Missile-3s*
  • 48 Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Missiles
  • 900 Patriot PAC-3

Mobile Interceptors

* Planned deliveries

military preparing to operate missile defense
Military Preparing to Operate Missile Defense
  • Missile defense mission assigned to STRATCOM
    • Plan, integrate and coordinate global missile defense operations
    • Develop a missile defense concept of operations
  • Combatant Commanders (CC) developing plans
    • NORTHCOM preparing for initial Limited Defensive Operations (LDO) in near future
    • Other CCs developing CONOPs for their AORs
  • Services have begun to man and train
    • Army providing staffing for GBI sites
    • Navy upgrading selected ships for missile defense mission
guidance on cooperation with allies friends
Guidance on Cooperation With Allies/Friends
  • Develop and deploy missile defenses capable of protecting allies and friends
  • Structure missile defense program to encourage industrial participation by allies and friends
  • Cooperation through broad alliances, bilaterally, industry-to-industry, military operations

National Security Presidential Directive 23, December 17, 2002

missile defense operations in iraqi freedom
Missile Defense Operations in Iraqi Freedom
  • Supported coalition in pre-deployment planning
    • High demand assets
    • Spread throughout the theater to protect US forces & allies
  • Successful during initial phase of combat
    • Protected sea-ports and staging areas allowing build-up and operational momentum
  • Sustained operations
    • Moved rapidly forward to protect advancing coalition forces

PAC-2 GEM/PAC-3 = 9 for 9

missile defense activities with allies friends
Missile Defense Activities with Allies/Friends
  • Australia
    • BMD Framework MOU signed
  • Denmark
    • Upgrade of Thule EWR; Negotiations on BMD Framework MOU
  • Germany
    • PAC-2/MEADS
  • Italy
    • MEADS; Negotiations on BMD Framework MOU
  • India
    • PAC-2 discussions begun; Exercise planning in progress
  • Japan
    • Acquiring layered national missile defense; BMD Framework MOU
  • The Netherlands
    • PAC-2/PAC-3
  • United Kingdom
    • Upgrade of Fylingdales EWR; BMD Framework MOU signed
  • Other Friends/Allies
    • Cooperative efforts underway/being discussed with Canada; Czech Republic; Hungary; Israel; Poland; Russia; Spain; Taiwan; Turkey.
building a foundation for missile defense
Building A Foundation for Missile Defense
  • Embedded in US strategic concepts and operations
    • Supports U.S. Defense Strategy
    • An important leg of the New Triad
  • Supported by military leadership
    • Global integrator mission assigned to the U.S. Strategic Command
    • Combatant Commanders preparing for initial operations
    • Services have begun to train and equip forces
  • No longer enmeshed in the ABM Treaty process
    • Withdrawal from ABM Treaty permits effective defenses
    • No new restrictions in other treaties
  • International Cooperation
    • Allied support and engagement
  • Commitment to continued deployment
    • Broad support from Congress for deployment
    • December 2002 announcement by President