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The Hook. Catchy Composition Clichés. Ask the reader a question. Use a catchy phrase or quote. Create a tongue twister. Make an exclamatory sentence. Use a lead in sentence that entices the reader to read on. The Hook. To catch the reader, use a hook in the introductory paragraph.

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The Hook

Catchy

Composition

Clichés


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  • Use a catchy phrase or quote.

  • Create a tongue twister.

  • Make an exclamatory sentence.

  • Use a lead in sentence that entices the reader to read on.

The Hook

To catch the reader, use a hook in the introductory paragraph.


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The Hook

The introductory paragraph begins with the hook, which combines with the topic sentence to form the first sentence.

The topic sentence can also directly follow the hook in the introductory paragraph.


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The HookAsk the Reader A Question

Entice the reader to continue reading to find the answer.

The question may be rhetorical, but the reader will still be hooked to draw his/her own conclusions.


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The Hook: Question

Ask the reader a question.

  • Have you ever…?


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The Hook: Question

Ask the reader a question.

  • Do you…?


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The Hook: Question

Ask the reader a question.

  • Why would you…?


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The Hook: Question

Ask the reader a question.

  • Would you…?


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The Hook: Question

Ask the reader a question.

  • Can you…?


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The Hook: Question

Ask the reader a question.

  • What do you…?


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The Hook: Question

Ask the reader a question.

  • How would you…?


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The Hook: Question

My Most Embarrassing Day

Have you ever had a day when nothing went right?

Do you ever feel like everything is going against you?

Can you remember a day when everything went wrong?


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The Hook: Question

My Best Friend

Have you ever had a friend who could tell you what you were thinking?

Do you have a friend you could call on at anytime?

Can you think of someone who knows your deepest thoughts?


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The Hook: Question

My Summer Vacation

Do you remember a summer that went by as quickly as this summer?

What would you think would be an interesting way to spend the summer?

Can you imagine spending the summer ---(insert your summer activity)?


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Using A Hook

Reread the writing prompt and try to think of a question to ask to get the reader involved in your composition.


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The Hook: Phrase or Quote

Start your composition with an entertaining flair by using a catchy phrase.

  • “Girls just wanna have fun,” would describe my best friend.

  • Short and sweet is the best way to sum up my summer vacation.

  • If anything can go wrong it will, at least, that was my experience on Friday the 13th.


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The Hook: Exclamatory Sentence

Vivid exclamatory sentences start the composition off with a bang!

  • Never in my wildest dreams could I imagine a worse day!

  • My summer vacation was gone in a hot flash!

  • She’s smart, she’s caring, she’s funny; and she’s my best friend!


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The Hook: Tongue Twisters

Tongue twisters are sentences in which several words begin with the same sound.

  • Loving, laughing, and loyal would be my best friend in a nutshell.

  • Some days soar into the stratosphere of our memories.


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The Hook: Tongue Twisters

This writing style is often called alliteration.

  • Summer sizzled into a simmering, stunted season.


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The Hook: Lead In

A lead in sentence is a technique often used by the news media. How many times have you heard a news intro use this type of teaser?


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The Hook: Lead In out.

Your mind begins to imagine all sorts of reasons, and you are determined to find out.

The lead in sentence makes the reader want to learn more.


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Kind, loving, trustworthy, and covered with fur describes my best friend.

It had to end better than it started, at least, I would have hoped so.

Most of the time I look forward to summer vacation.

The Hook: Lead In


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The Hook best friend

In the introductory paragraph, use techniques that hook the reader.

Ask a question.

Use a catchy phrase or quote.

Make up a tongue twister.

Make an exclamatory sentence.

Use a lead in sentence that entices the reader to read on.


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The Hook best friend

Use a hook to lure the reader into the composition.


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