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Texas Independence… From San Antonio To San Jacinto - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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“I must say as to what I have seen of Texas it is the garden spot of the world. The best land and the best prospects for health I ever saw, and I do believe it is a fortune to any man to come here. There is world of country here to settle.” -Davy Crockett - 1836 Texas Independence…

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Presentation Transcript
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“I must say as to what I have seen of Texas it is the garden spot of the world. The best land and the best prospects for health I ever saw, and I do believe it is a fortune to any man to come here. There is world of country here to settle.”

-Davy Crockett - 1836

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Texas Independence…

From San Antonio

To

San Jacinto

slide3

The road to independence was not an easy one and many people paid for this independence with their lives.

slide4

Who are these Texas Heroes?

What battles led to our independence?

slide5

Davy Crockett

Sam Houston

Jim Bowie

William Travis

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On February 24 Jim Bowie became ill leaving Travis in full command. Travis sent out his well known plea for help on that day.
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"The 59 signers who forged a nation out of this wilderness left this unique legacy, this indisputable truth, what Texans can dream, Texans can do." George W. Bush The 46th Governor of Texas

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Around five o'clock in the morning on March 6Santa Anna hurled his columns at the battered walls of the Alamo from four directions
dawn at the alamo
Dawn at the Alamo

By dawn it was over and by eight o'clock every

defender was dead.

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ALAMO

1836

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March 25, 1836

The men sent to respond to the plea for help at the Alamo, were ordered to retreat to Victoria. But even that could not happen.

Mexican forces forced them to surrender along with prisoners of war from the Battle of Refugio.

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Massacre at Goliad

March 25, 1836

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March 27th, 1836

List of Fannin’s men

Texan’s, prisoners of Santa Anna, were divided into three formations and marched to the San Antonio River. 342 Texans were executed…a mere 28 escaped.

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The massacre of Goliad earned Santa Anna the reputation of a brutal commander and turned many to support the cause of the Texas Revolution.

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After hearing about the slaughter at the Alamo, the colonists packed what they could carry and headed for Louisiana
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"Remember the Alamo!"

"Remember Goliad!"

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A monument, The San Jacinto Monument, as placed at the location of the Battle of San Jacinto to preserve the proud history of Texas. The famous Battle of San Jacinto that brought Texas its independence was fought on the site of the monument.

the memorial to the battle of san jacinto
The Memorial to the Battle of San Jacinto

The world’s tallest war memorial. It is 15 feet taller than the Washington monument. The San Jacinto Monument honors all of those who fought for Texas’s independence.

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The monument was built from 1936-1939 and was designed by architect Alfred C. Finn, engineer Robert J. Cummins and Jesse H. Jones.

The base of the monument has bronze doors emblazoned with the six flags of Texas. The base is 125 feet square with text panels highlighting the significant events history leading up to the Texas Revolution.

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The monument is a 570 foot shaft, topped by a 34 foot star symbolizing the Lone Star Republic.

The monument weight 70 million 300,000 pounds. It’s base is 125 feet tapering to 30 feet at the top. The walls are 4 feet thick at the base and 2 feet thick at the top.

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No one was buried alive in wet concrete.

  • Only 35 of the 150 men hired had construction experience.
  • After completion, the mast and boom were removed by lowering them through the elevator shaft since the taper of the monument wouldn’t allow lowering.
  • The shaft rose at the rate of 24 feet per week.
  • The working platform (which rose as the shaft was built) weighed 65 tons.
  • The star on the top weighs 220 tons
  • The 3 dimensional star is 34 feet from point to point.
  • The sculpted stone panels weigh 4 tons each.
  • The re-enforcement bars were 2 inches by 2 inches and 110 feet long
  • The bars were bent easily, but were straightened by a railroad straightening device borrowed from the local railroad yard.

Top 10 Facts about the

Construction of the San Jacinto Monument

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“I must say as to what I have seen of Texas it is the garden spot of the world. The best land and the best prospects for health I ever saw, and I do believe it is a fortune to any man to come here. There is world of country here to settle.”

-Davy Crockett - 1836

resources
Resources
  • www.tsha.utexas.edu/.../ books/jacinto1.html
  • Texas State Archives Commission
  • http://www.sanjacinto.navy.mil/battle.htm
  • www.tejasland.com/ history/default.asp
  • www.goodeatsoftexas.com/ texas_attractions.html
  • http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/park/sanjac/monu.htm
  • http://www.sanjacinto-museum.org/
  • http://www.tamu.edu/ccbn/dewitt/batsanjacinto.htm
  • http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/view/SS/qes4.html
  • http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/park/sanjac/