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DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds. Week 7 Designing Virtual Worlds for Games 6pm – 9pm Tuesday, September 4 th , 2007 Kathryn Merrick and Owen Macindoe. DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007. Announcements.

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desc9180 designing virtual worlds
DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds

Week 7

Designing Virtual Worlds for Games

6pm – 9pm

Tuesday, September 4th, 2007

Kathryn Merrick and Owen Macindoe

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

announcements
Announcements
  • I have marked your assignments.
    • They will be handed back in the tutorial.
  • Check out the gallery at:
    • http://www.it.usyd.edu.au/~kkas0686/desc9180readings/task1_gallery.htm

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

lecture overview
Lecture Overview
  • Demonstrations:
    • World of Warcraft and Pharaoh
  • Virtual worlds for games:
    • History
    • Requirements of a virtual game world
    • Other properties of virtual game worlds
  • Introduction to Task 2

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

the first virtual game world
The First Virtual Game World
  • 1962: Spacewar! developed by researchers at MIT
  • Two players each control a spaceship orbiting a planet
    • Players can shoot, turn and accelerate
    • Goal is to hit the other player

Spacewar!, The first computer game (Stephen Russel, 1962)

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

history of computer game genres
History of Computer Game Genres

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

action games
Action Games
  • Usually require use of deadly force to save the world from forces of evil
    • Wolfenstein 3D, Doom, Quake, Descent, Half-Life, Tomb Raider, Unreal Tournament, Halo

Doom: Episode III: Inferno

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

virtual world design action games
Virtual World Design: Action Games
  • Virtual environment:
    • Battle fields, dungeons
    • Training grounds
    • Weapons, armour
  • Characters:
    • Teachers
    • Partners
    • Enemies

Captain Comic (1988)

Half Life

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

sport games
Sport Games
  • Players are coaches or athletes in popular sports
    • Football, basketball, cricket, racing…

Mario Kart Wii

Madden 06

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

virtual world design sports games
Virtual World Design: Sports Games
  • Virtual environment:
    • Playing fields
    • Race tracks
    • Training grounds
  • Characters:
    • Opposition
    • Team members

The original Atari upright cabinet for Pong

The Pong playing field

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

adventure games or interactive fiction
Adventure Games or Interactive Fiction
  • Emphasise story telling and puzzle solving rather than combat or sporting conflict
    • King’s Quest, Zork, Monkey Island

The Hobbit

Lemmings

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

virtual world design adventure games
Virtual World Design: Adventure Games
  • Characters:
    • Tell the story
    • Partners
  • Virtual environment:
    • Objects to support the plot
    • Contain puzzles

The Curse of Monkey Island

Monkey Island II: LeChuck’s Revenge

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

simulation and strategy games
Simulation and Strategy Games
  • Player has ‘god-like’ control over a virtual simulated world
  • World or characters respond to player actions by evolving
  • SimCity, Caesar, Pharaoh, Black and White, Creatures

SimCity (for Atari)

SimCity 4

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

virtual world design simulation and strategy games
Virtual World Design: Simulation and Strategy Games
  • Virtual environment:
    • Highly modifiable
    • Dynamic
  • Characters:
    • Evolve or change their behaviour in response to changes in their environment

Norns from Creatures

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

role playing games
Role-Playing Games
  • Players take on a role such as a magician, thief or warrior…
  • They pursue quests, collect materials, craft items, sell goods, fight monsters…

A battle ground at the end of a raid (left) and dance party (right) in World of Warcraft

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

virtual world design role playing games
Virtual World Design: Role-Playing Games
  • Virtual environment :
    • Battle grounds
    • Social spaces
    • Commercial centres
    • Educational or training centres
  • Characters:
    • Merchants, teachers, enemies, quest givers…

Auction house (top) and bank (bottom) in World of Warcraft

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

properties of virtual game worlds
Properties of Virtual Game Worlds

Non - persistent

Single player

‘god-like’ control

Dynamic world

Text based

Networked

Third person

2D isometric

Persistent

Online

First person

Static world

3D world

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

introduction to task 2 you versus the world
Introduction to Task 2:You Versus the World
  • Design and implement a game that has no humanoid or animal characters
    • The aim is to build an exciting and dynamicvirtual space

IBM’s maze in Second Life (left)

Surfeit Surface’s Crooked House in Second Life (right)

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

marks for implementation due 23 10 2007
Marks for Implementation (Due 23/10/2007)
  • Use of prims (2 marks)
  • Use of sculpted prims (3 marks)
  • Simple scripts (3 marks)
  • Agents (3 marks)
  • Use of space (4 marks)
  • Plot cues (4 marks)
  • Sense of place (4 marks)

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

group report
Group Report
  • Due Tuesday, 23/10/2007, 6pm
  • Real and Second Life names of group members
  • Location of game in Second Life
  • Plot of the game (2 marks)
  • Design principles (3 marks)
    • How plot is communicated, navigational cues, aesthetics, user experiences
  • Strengths and Limitations (3 marks)
  • Future improvements (2 marks)

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

group planning and participation
Group Planning and Participation
  • This is an individual mark based on:
    • Group plans, progress reports and meeting minutes (4 marks)
    • Review of object and script ownership (4 marks)
    • Tutorial attendance in sessions dedicated to Task 2 (2 marks)
  • Group folder due 23/10/2007, 6pm

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

group presentation 23 10 2007
Group Presentation (23/10/2007)
  • This is your opportunity to show off your game!
  • Each group will have 20 minutes
  • Presentation should include:
    • Slides describing plot, strengths, weaknesses (2 marks)
    • Demonstration of game-play sequences (3 marks)

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

feedback on assignment 1
Feedback on Assignment 1
  • Design:
    • Marks for this were very high
    • Marks mainly lost for:
      • No navigational cues
      • Little or no use of textures

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

feedback on assignment 123
Feedback on Assignment 1
  • Presentation:
    • Marks mainly lost if:
      • I couldn’t hear you
      • You didn’t explicitly say why your space was an impossible place or why it was a social space.

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

feedback on assignment 124
Feedback on Assignment 1
  • Report:
    • Some hints for future reports:
      • When a report spec has detailed requirements, use those requirements as headings for your report
      • Check your spelling and grammar
    • Marks lost for:
      • Report specs not met or too brief

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

tutorial
Tutorial
  • Sculpted prims!
    • Try out one or more of the tutorials recommended on this week’s tutorial sheet.

DESC9180 Designing Virtual Worlds University of Sydney, September 2007

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