becoming a helper 4 th edition l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Becoming A Helper 4 th Edition PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Becoming A Helper 4 th Edition

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 55

Becoming A Helper 4 th Edition - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 864 Views
  • Uploaded on

Becoming A Helper 4 th Edition. by Marianne Schneider Corey & Gerald Corey Wadsworth Group A division of Thomson Learning, Inc. To what degree do you have the need to make an impact return a favor care for others work on your personal issues (self-help) be needed. make money

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Becoming A Helper 4 th Edition


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
becoming a helper 4 th edition

Becoming A Helper 4th Edition

by Marianne Schneider Corey & Gerald Corey

Wadsworth Group

A division of

Thomson Learning, Inc.

what are your needs as a helper
To what degree do you have the need to

make an impact

return a favor

care for others

work on your personal issues (self-help)

be needed

make money

gain prestige and status

provide answers

gain and maintain control

variety and flexibility

What Are Your Needs as a Helper?

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 1 (1)

portrait of the ideal helper
Portrait of the Ideal Helper
  • Some of the characteristics of a helper who is making a significant difference are:
    • being committed to assessing your strengths and weaknesses
    • doing in your own life what you expect your clients to do
    • having good interpersonal skills
    • recognizing that it takes hard work to bring about change
    • welcoming and understanding diversity

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 1 (2)

portrait of the ideal helper4
Portrait of the Ideal Helper
  • Some of the characteristics of a helper who is making a significant difference (continued):
    • being aware of your own problems and monitoring how they influence your work with clients
    • taking care of yourself
    • questioning life and engaging in self-examination
    • having meaningful relationships in your life
    • having a healthy sense of self-love

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 1 (3)

factors in choosing a career path
Factors in Choosing a Career Path
  • Recognize that choosing a career path is an ongoing process rather than a one-time event
  • In choosing a career, it is well to consider the following factors:
    • self-concept
    • motivation and achievement
    • interests
    • abilities
    • values

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 1 (4)

factors in choosing a career path6
Some work values for you to explore include:

income

power

prestige

job security

variety

achievement

responsibility

independence

family relationships

interests

serving people

adventure

creativity

inner harmony

teamwork

intellectual challenge

competition

Factors in Choosing a Career Path

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 1 (5)

how to get the most from your fieldwork experience
How to Get The Most from Your Fieldwork Experience
  • There are concrete steps you can take to ensure getting the maximum benefit from your fieldwork and supervision experiences
  • Assume an open stance in learning from your supervisions This can best be done by:
    • being able to ask for what you need
    • saying "I don't know" at times
    • expressing your reactions
    • dealing with yourself and your client in supervision
    • being willing to learn from supervisors, without copying their styles
    • accepting different styles of supervision
    • being assertive without becoming aggressive

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 2 (1)

know thyself then help others
Know Thyself, Then Help Others
  • The value of self-exploration
    • Knowing yourself is a basic requisite to helping others
    • Using individual and group counseling for self-exploration

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 3 (1)

know thyself then help others9
Essential that you understand your family-of-origin issues

Identify issues in your family of origin -- how your experiences in your family have current influences

Become aware of how your issues with your family might help or hinder you in working with families

Identify your role in your family

Review ways you related to siblings and parents

Identify family rules

Ways you coped with conflicts in your family

Messages you received from your family

Significant developments in your family

Identify areas for further self-exploration

Know Thyself, Then Help Others

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 3 (2)

life transitions
Life Transitions
  • Overview of the nine stages of development from infancy to old age
    • 1. INFANCY: (Birth to age 1) Task is to develop a sense of trust in self, others, and the environment
    • 2. EARLY CHILDHOOD: (Ages 1 to 3) Task is to begin the journey toward autonomy
    • 3. PRESCHOOL AGE: (Ages 3 to 6) Task is to find out who we are and what we are able to do
    • 4. MIDDLE CHILDHOOD: (Ages 6 to 12) Task is to achieve a sense of industry

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 4 (1)

life transitions11
Life Transitions
  • Overview of the nine stages of development from infancy to old age
    • 5. ADOLESCENCE: (Ages 12 to 20) Task is to search for an identify and find one’s voice
    • 6. EARLY ADULTHOOD: (Ages 20 to 35) Task is to form intimate relationship
    • 7. MIDDLE ADULTHOOD: (Ages 35 to 55) Task is to learn how to live creatively with ourselves and others
    • 8. LATE MIDDLE AGE: (Ages 55 to 70) Task is to decide what we want to do with the rest of our lives
    • 9. LATE ADULTHOOD: (Age 70 onward) Task is to complete a life review and put life into perspective

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 4 (2)

some key questions for self reflection
Some Key Questions for Self-Reflection
  • What are some major turning points in your development?
  • How have your earlier experiences impacted your present way of thinking, feeling, and behaving?
  • Are there any ways that you’ve converted your problems into sources of strength?

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 4 (3)

the five stages of the helping process
The Five Stages of the Helping Process
  • Stage 1: Establishing a working relationship
    • Create a relationship that allows client to tell their story
    • Create a climate for change
    • Establish a working relationship -- make us of basic listening and attending skills and establish rapport
    • Educate clients and obtain informed consent
  • Stage 2: Identifying clients’ problems
    • Create a therapeutic climate so clients can identify and clarify their problems
    • Strive to understand the social and cultural context of the client's problem -- and avoid "blaming the victim"
    • Conduct an initial assessment
    • Identify exceptions to one’s problems

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 5 (1)

the five stages of the helping process14
The Five Stages of the Helping Process
  • Stage 3: Helping clients create goals
    • Help clients gain a focus -- narrow down the task
    • Assist clients to identify specific goals
    • Establish and refine goals collaboratively
  • Stage 4: Encouraging clients exploration and taking action
    • Confront clients with care and respect -- challenging clients is a way of demonstrating your involvement
    • Make use of appropriate, timely, and relevant self-disclosure
    • Identify ways to accomplish goals
    • Develop and assess action strategies
    • Carry out an action program

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 5 (2)

the five stages of the helping process15
The Five Stages of the Helping Process
  • Stage 5: Termination
    • Help clients bring closure to their work and consolidate their learnings
    • Assist clients in developing a plan for continuing the change process on their own

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 5 (3)

understanding transference
Understanding Transference
  • The following are some common ways that clients may respond to you:
    • Clients who make you into something you are not
    • Clients who see you as a super person
    • Clients who make unrealistic demands on you
    • Clients who are not able to accept boundaries
    • Clients who displace anger onto you
    • Clients who easily fall in love with you

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 6 (1)

dealing with transference
Dealing with Transference
  • Some pointers in effectively dealing with transference or client reactions to you:
    • Be willing to examine your own reactions
    • Monitor your own countertransference
    • Seek supervision or consultation with difficult cases
    • Avoid blaming or judging the client
    • Avoid labeling clients
    • Demonstrate understanding and respect

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 6 (2)

difficult clients or difficult helpers
Difficult Clients or Difficult Helpers?
  • Some common problematic behaviors displayed by clients at times:
    • Clients who are sent to you -- involuntary clients
    • Clients who are typically silent and withdrawn
    • Clients who talk excessively
    • Clients who overwhelm themselves
    • Clients who often say “Yes, but . . .”
    • Clients who blame others
    • Clients who deny needing help
    • Clients who are overly dependent on you

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 6 (3)

difficult clients or difficult helpers19
Difficult Clients or Difficult Helpers?
  • Some more common problematic behaviors displayed by clients at times:
    • Clients who manifest passive-aggressive behavior
    • Clients who rely primarily on their intellect
    • Clients who use emotions as a defense
  • Two things to keep in mind when you are dealing with difficult behavior manifested by clients are:
    • Avoid getting defensive and reacting with sarcasm
    • Let clients know how their behavior is affecting you

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 6 (4)

values in the helping process
Values in the Helping Process
  • Values are a basic part of any helping relationship
  • Examples of basic values that constitute the foundation of the helping relationship
    • assuming responsibility for one’s actions
    • developing the ability to give and receive affection
    • being sensitive to the feelings of others
    • practicing self-control
    • finding a sense of purpose and meaning in life
    • being open, honest, and genuine
    • developing successful interpersonal relationships

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 7 (1)

values in the helping process21
Values in the Helping Process
  • Some key questions to reflect on
    • What is the difference between exposing versus imposing my values?
    • What are the basic values I hold pertaining to the helping process?
    • It is acceptable that my values are showing?
    • How can I determine when and how to share my values with clients?
    • What are some areas where I am most likely to encounter value conflicts with clients?
    • How can I best deal with value conflicts?

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 7 (2)

potential for conflict of values
Potential forConflict of Values
  • Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Issues
  • Family Issues
  • Gender-Role Identity
  • Religious and Spiritual Values
  • Abortion
  • Sexuality
  • End-of-Life Decisions

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 7 (3)

cultural diversity
Cultural Diversity
  • A multicultural perspective on helping
    • Ethical practice implies incorporating a multicultural perspective in all helping relationships
    • The professional codes call for a diversity perspective
    • It is essential that helpers become aware of their own biases, cultural values, and basic attitudes toward diversity
    • Helpers are challenged to identify and overcome cultural tunnel vision

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 8 (1)

cultural diversity24
Cultural Diversity
  • Recognize and challenge your cultural assumptions
    • What are your assumptions about:
      • self-disclosure?
      • family values?
      • nonverbal behavior?
      • trusting relationships?
      • self-actualization?
      • directness and assertiveness?

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 8 (2)

multicultural competencies
Multicultural Competencies
  • Some beliefs and attitudes of culturally skilled helpers
    • Familiarity with your own culture
    • Ability to identify your basic assumptions
    • Not allowing your bias, values, or problems interfere with working with culturally different clients
    • Welcoming diverse value orientations
    • Monitoring your functioning through consultation and supervision

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 8 (3)

multicultural competencies26
Multicultural Competencies
  • Some areas of knowledge of culturally skilled helpers
    • Understand worldview of clients with different cultural backgrounds
    • Possess specific knowledge of particular individuals with whom you are working
    • Acknowledge your own racist attitudes, beliefs, and feelings
    • View diversity in a positive light
    • Know how to help clients make use of indigenous support systems

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 8 (4)

multicultural competencies27
Multicultural Competencies
  • Some skills and intervention strategies of culturally skilled helpers
    • Seek out consultation to help develop necessary skills
    • Use methods and define goals consistent with the life experiences of culturally diverse client populations
    • Be willing to go outside of the office
    • Educate clients about the helping process

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 8 (5)

ethical practice
Ethical Practice
  • Ethical practice requires that you:
    • base your actions on informed, sound, and responsible judgment
    • consult with colleagues or seek supervision
    • keep your knowledge and skills current
    • engage in a continual process of self-examination
    • remain open

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 9 (1)

role of professional codes
Role of Professional Codes
  • Professional codes :
    • educate us about responsibilities
    • are a basis of accountability
    • protect rights and welfare of clients
    • are a basis for improving professional practice

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 9 (2)

ethical decision making
Ethical Decision Making
  • Ethical decision-making model:

1. Identify the problem or dilemma

2. Identify the potential issues involved

3. Apply the ethics codes

4. Know the applicable laws and regulations

5. Obtain consultation

6. Consider possible and probable courses of action

7. Explore the consequences of various decisions

8. Decide on the course of action

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 9 (3)

informed consent
Informed Consent
  • Clients need enough information about the helping process to be able to make informed choices
    • The informed consent process begins with the intake interview and continues for the duration of the helping relationship
      • The aim is to involve clients in a collaborative partnership

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 9 (4)

confidentiality
Confidentiality
  • Confidentiality is a central concept in the client-helper relationship
    • Confidentiality needs to be discussed with clients from the onset of the relationship
    • Confidentiality is essential but is not absolute
    • Some exceptions to confidentiality:
      • Client poses a danger to self or others
      • Client under age of 16 is the victim of abuse
      • Client needs to be hospitalized
      • Information is made an issue in a court action
      • Client requests a release of record

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 9 (5)

client autonomy
Client Autonomy
  • Respecting the client’s autonomy is basic
    • Helpers do not make decisions for clients, nor do they foster dependent attitudes and behavior
    • As helpers, your main job is to put yourself out of business

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 9 (6)

ethical issues in managed care
Ethical Issues in Managed Care
  • Five major ethical issues regarding practices of managed care
    • Informed Consent
    • Confidentiality
    • Abandonment
    • Utilization Review
    • Competence

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 9 (7)

grounds for malpractice
Grounds for Malpractice
  • Abandoning a client
  • Sexual misconduct
  • Breaking confidentiality inappropriately
  • Failing to respect a client's privacy
  • Failing to protect others from a dangerous client
  • Practicing beyond one's competence
  • Failing to honor a contract with a client
  • Failing to provide for informed consent

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 9 (8)

ways to prevent malpractice actions
Ways to Prevent Malpractice Actions
  • Make use of informed consent procedures
  • Define clear contracts with clients
  • Do not practice outside of your competence
  • Take steps to maintain your competence
  • Document carefully
  • Know and follow state and local laws
  • Know and follow the codes of ethics
  • Respect confidentiality
  • Report any cases of suspected child abuse
  • Carefully consider bartering arrangements

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 9 (9)

ways to prevent malpractice actions37
Ways to Prevent Malpractice Actions
  • Keep relationships with clients professional
  • Avoid engaging in sexual relationships with clients
  • Treat your clients with respect
  • Obtain parental consent when working with minors
  • Make use of assessment procedures
  • Make it a practice to consult with colleagues
  • Keep current client records
  • Avoid promising clients anything you cannot deliver
  • Anchor your practice to a theory
  • Abide by the policies of the institution that employs you

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 9 (10)

codes on multiple relationships
Codes on Multiple Relationships
  • Codes caution against forming dual or multiple relationships with clients
  • Dual or multiple relationships
    • Can be sexual or nonsexual
    • Sexual dual relationships, by their nature, are unethical
    • Nonsexual dual or multiple relationships tend to be complex
    • Maintaining appropriate boundaries is what is essential
    • Some dual relationships can be avoided
    • Not all dual relationships can be avoided
    • Dual or multiple relationships are not necessarily harmful or unethical

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 10 (1)

when operating in more than one role
When Operating in More Than One Role
  • Avoid combining professional and personal relationships
  • Set healthy boundaries from the outset
  • Secure informed consent of clients
  • Involve the client in setting the boundaries of the relationship
  • Discuss the potential benefits and risks with the client
  • Seek consultation
  • Work under supervision when needed
  • Document and monitor their practices
  • Refer when necessary

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 10 (2)

socializing with former clients
Socializing with Former Clients
  • Socializing with former clients is probably unwise
  • Imbalance of power likely never changes
  • Helpers need to be aware of their motivations
  • Former clients may need helper at a later time
  • Helpers need to establish their own boundaries

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 10 (3)

guidelines for bartering
Guidelines for Bartering
  • Think carefully before engaging in bartering
  • Involve the client in the decision making process
  • Determine the value of goods or services in a collaborative fashion
  • Consider the cultural context
  • Establish specific conditions
  • Document the arrangement
  • Consult with experienced colleagues or supervisors

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 10 (4)

accepting gifts
Accepting Gifts
  • Questions to consider in making a decision of whether or not to accept gifts from the client
    • What is the monetary value of the gift?
    • What are the clinical implications of accepting or rejecting the gift?
    • When in the helping process is the offering of a gift occurring?
    • What are the helper’s motivations for accepting or rejecting a client’s gift?
    • What are the cultural implications of accepting or rejecting the gift?

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 10 (5)

sexual attractions
Sexual Attractions
  • How helpers can deal with sexual attractions to clients
    • Acknowledge the feelings to oneself
    • Explore the reasons for the attraction
    • Never act on these feelings
    • Talk with a colleague or a supervisor
    • Seek personal counseling if necessary
    • Monitor boundaries by setting clear limits

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 10 (6)

working in the community
Working in the Community
  • The community approach involves four facets

1. Direct Client Services -- Outreach approach

2. Indirect Client Services -- Client advocacy

3. Direct Community Services – Preventive education

4. Indirect Community Services – Changing the social environment

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 11 (1)

multiple roles of community workers
Multiple Roles of Community Workers
  • Helpers need to be able to assume nontraditional roles if they hope to make an impact on social systems. These roles include:
    • Advocate
    • Change agent
    • Consultant
    • Adviser
    • Facilitator of indigenous support systems
    • Facilitator of indigenous healing systems

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 11 (2)

skills in mobilizing community resources
Skills in Mobilizing Community Resources
  • Achieve credibility within the community
  • Build on the strengths of the community
  • Establish and maintain a personal network
  • Assist the community to identify its needs
  • Assume responsibility for instigating change
  • Address ethical issues in the delivery of services

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 11 (3)

special populations
Special Populations
  • How to work with special populations
    • Be aware of your own assumptions, beliefs, and stereotypes
    • Challenge ways society might stigmatize special groups
    • Identify specific populations most in need of help
    • Reach out to a target population
    • Direct educational efforts toward action programs

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 12 (1)

working with groups
Working with Groups
  • Group work as a treatment of choice
    • Some of the advantages of using groups are
      • Groups fit well into the managed care model
      • Groups can be brief and cost-effective
      • Groups provide a sense of community
      • Groups foster interpersonal learning
      • Groups have unique healing qualities
      • Groups provide a natural place to experiment with change
      • Groups provide members with feedback
      • Groups allow people to learn from one another
      • Groups offer both support and challenge

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 13 (1)

working with families
Working with Families
  • Some assumptions of a family systems approach:
    • Client's problematic behavior may serve a function for family
    • Dysfunctional patterns may be passed across generations
    • Actions by any family member will influence other members
    • An individual may carry symptoms for the entire family
    • Individuals are best understood within the context of a family system
    • Accurate assessment of an individual's problems requires observation of other family members
    • Focusing on individual dynamics without considering dynamics within a system gives an incomplete picture

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 13 (2)

stress for helpers
Stress for Helpers
  • Common individual stressors
    • Striving for perfection
    • Excessive need for approval
    • Self-doubt
    • Physical and emotional exhaustion
    • Assuming too much responsibility for clients
    • Ruminating about cases
  • Stresses association with working in organizations
    • Excessive demands of agencies
    • Constant paperwork
    • Dehumanization and erosion of ideals

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 14 (1)

stress and burnout
Stress and Burnout
  • How stress paves the way to burnout
    • Stress at work tends to impact your personal life
    • Working intensely with people opens you up to your own wounds -- it reactivates earlier conflicts and pain
    • Constant stress that is not managed results in physical and psychological exhaustion
  • Burnout
    • There are internal and external causes of burnout
    • Chronic burnout can lead to becoming impaired
    • You are challenged with recognizing signs of burnout before you become an impaired practitioner

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 14 (2)

take care of yourself
Take Care of Yourself
  • The challenge of self-care for helpers
    • There are no easy answers
    • Important for you to discover your own path to keeping alive
    • Develop a personal strategy for coping with stress and dealing with burnout

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 15 (1)

cognitive approaches to self care
Cognitive Approaches to Self-Care
  • Learn to identify constructive and nonconstructive beliefs
  • Recognize the ways your thinking influences your behavior
  • Challenge distorted beliefs
  • Acquire ways to change self-defeating thinking

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 15 (2)

you have control over yourself
You Have Control Over Yourself
  • Assess your current behavior to see if it is working
  • Strive to develop realistic expectations
  • Learn practical strategies for managing stress
  • Realize you are one person
  • Avoid taking on too many projects at once
  • Learn time management techniques
  • Practice time management strategies
  • Find other sources of meaning besides work

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 15 (3)

you have control over yourself55
You Have Control Over Yourself
  • Learn and respect your own limits
  • Strive for variety within your job
  • Build linkages with colleagues and friends
  • Watch for subtle signs of burnout
  • Make taking care of yourself a priority
  • Treat yourself as you want others to treat you
  • Recognize that you can be an active agent in your life

Becoming A Helper - Chapter 15 (4)