Applying DROPS approach to preventing dropped object incidents In the Singapore construction industry Leong Weng Fei M.S - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Applying DROPS approach to preventing dropped object incidents In the Singapore construction industry Leong Weng Fei M.S
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Applying DROPS approach to preventing dropped object incidents In the Singapore construction industry Leong Weng Fei M.S

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  1. Applying DROPS approach to preventing dropped object incidents In the Singapore construction industry Leong Weng Fei M.Sc, B.Eng(Hons), CMIOSH, ACMA Asia Pacific HSE Director, Baker Hughes Inc. DROPS Asia Chairman

  2. “Working to make our industry a safer place”

  3. To raise awareness of potential dropped objects • To explore methods for the control and prevention of dropped objects • To recognise your personal responsibilities for the prevention of dropped objects • Eliminate injury to people and damage sustained to equipment due to dropped objects throughout Industry. • Ultimately to deliver a ‘second-nature’ dropped objects prevention strategy DROPS Asia Objectives

  4. ” WHAT IS A DROPPED OBJECT? Any object that falls from its previous static position under its own weight

  5. ” “ ” HOW BAD IS THE PROBLEM? AT WORK : Dropped Objects are among the Top 10 causes of Fatality and Serious Injury in the Oil and Gas Industry AT HOME AND AT LEISURE : The top three causes of fatal accidents are… falls from height…being struck by moving vehicles…and being struck by falling objects (RoSPA)

  6. NIOSH 2003 – 2006Fatalities amongUS Oil and Gas Workers It’s Still Happening…Real Incidents

  7. It’s Still Happening…Real Incidents

  8. Over 70 companies all sharing commitment and enthusiasm for dropped object prevention. • Basic remit to consider and review all avenues available for improving the industry’s dropped object prevention performance. • Distil and identify key learnings and deliver these to industry effectively as awareness, best practice, recommendations, lessons, tools and techniques. DROPS Worldwide

  9. Happened in 2006, Petaling Jaya, Malaysia • Corporate figured killed when 2 tonne (3m X 3m) formwork fell on his vehicle • Raised many questions about standards, compliance, enforcement, culture in the industry that could have led to this incident. This is what we all aim to prevent!

  10. Even small objects can kill!!!

  11. Awareness and appreciation of DROPS • Inspection and Surveys • Control Measures: • Static and dynamic dropped object risk • DROPS systems / procedures • Enforcement and industry self regulation DROPS Approach to Preventing Dropped Object Incidents

  12. Poor awareness and appreciation on DROPS in construction industry • Controls and regulations do cover DROPS but awareness and appreciation of criticality of DROPS is missing • Approach in the oil and gas industry: • All DROPS incident are considered hi-po incidents • Massive awareness blitz on DROPS in the industry through: • Posters • Training • Videos – sample language free video on Tools at Height to be shown at the end • Campaigns etc. • Sustained DROPS specific awareness and appreciation campaign in Singapore is needed Awareness and Appreciation of DROPS

  13. Awareness and Appreciation of DROPS

  14. Awareness and Appreciation of DROPS

  15. Survey and inspection key to preventing dropped object risk • Dropped Object Survey Criteria (ensures consistency in surveys) • Inspection Areas • The Survey • What to look out for • Required survey tasks • Deliverables • Dropped Objects Survey Report • Failed Item List • Dropped Objects Inspection Book Survey and Inspection

  16. Survey tasks: • Document equipment location by Inspection Area • Photograph each item surveyed • Include unique identification number to each item (tag numbers) • Describe each item surveyed • Inspect and document Primary Securing method(s) • Inspect and document Secondary Retention method(s) • Record equipment condition as Pass or Fail, including comments (ie Satisfactory or Reason for Failure) • Record inspection frequency (ie weekly, monthly) as recorded in the Equipment Family Inspection Criteria • Generate a Failed Items List Survey and Inspection

  17. Survey and Inspection

  18. Survey and Inspection

  19. Survey and Inspection

  20. Example Equipment Family Inspection Criteria AREA 1 : Derrick/Mast and Traveling Equipment Derrick Equipment Zone 1 (A-Frame / Crown / Water Table) Survey and Inspection

  21. Survey and inspection for construction industry: • Recommendation to conduct survey/inspection on a routine basis • Eg. survey should be done upon installation of tower crane, formwork, scaffold etc. which have drop potential • Initial survey helps to produce inventory of equipment used at height • Initial survey output can be basis for determining frequency for subsequent surveys/inspection • Maintenance of critical equipment can also be determined through survey and inspection output • Essential to have inspectors/surveyors to have sufficient knowledge and experience in DROPS for survey/inspections to be effective Survey and Inspection

  22. Static and Dynamic Dropped Objects • Dropped Object Management System (DOMS) effective in reducing frequency of static dropped object incidents Control Measures : Static and Dynamic Dropped Objects

  23. Behavioral factors more dominant in controlling dynamic dropped objects Static and Dynamic Dropped Object

  24. Examples of static dropped objects in a work site: • Scaffold and its parts • Formwork • Tower crane etc. • Compared to offshore environment, risk of static dropped object in construction worksite is lower but less precautions are taken • What is done in the oil and gas industry: • Secondary retention system on objects placed at height • Designing equipment at height with consideration for DROPS • Minimizing need to place objects at height • Pre-commissioning/installation inspection • Periodic inspection through use of picture book Managing Static Dropped Objects

  25. Managing static dropped object in construction industry: • Ensuring objects at height come with primary and secondary retention devices • Inventory of parts that has potential to drop • Produce picture book and use that as a mean to inspect after installation and periodic inspection • Use of equipment that has lower DROPS risk eg. clamp free scaffolds, bolts and nuts with locknut/pin • Commisioning/post installation checklist that includes DROPS check items • Zoning/Baricading of danger/high risk zone Managing Static Dropped Objects

  26. Primary and Secondary Retention PRIMARY SECURING DEVICES Nuts, bolts, screws Clamps, Brackets Turnbuckles Welding SECONDARY RETENTION Wire slings Encasement Lock Nuts Lock Wire Split pins, roll pins, spring clips Lock Washers, tab washers Clamp and safety chains Managing Static Dropped Objects

  27. Secondary Retention Managing Static Dropped Objects

  28. Example of dynamic dropped objects: • Hand tools • Material on crane etc. • What is done in the oil and gas industry: • Work at height tools • Red zones / No-go zones • Trained and competent lifting personnel • PTW for lifting operation • Managing dynamic dropped object in construction industry: • Promote use of work at height tools • Use concept of zoning • Improve competency and DROPS awareness of lifting personnel Managing Dynamic Dropped Object Risk

  29. Managing Dynamic Dropped Object Risk

  30. Management system approach towards DROPS in oil and gas industry • Commitment of operators and contractors towards DROPS • DROPS focal person in every rig is appointed. Similar concept can be done for all worksites • DROPS survey is done before a rig is commissioned. Results of survey compiled in the form of picture book and used for routine inspection of high risk equipment. • Similar initiative can be done for erection of tower cranes, formwork, scaffolds etc. • Zoning system used in oil and gas industry • Managing contractors – ensuring that equipment used by contractors are also controlled against dropped object risk DROPS System and Procedures

  31. DROPS Guidance:Restricted Access Areas (Red Zones)

  32. Green Zone: where the layout and activities of the area present little likelihood of personnel being exposed to potential dropped objects under normal circumstances. • Yellow Zone: where the layout and activities of the area do present some risk of personnel being exposed to potential dropped objects under normal circumstances. • Red Zone: where the layout and activities of the area present significant risk of personnel being exposed to potential dropped objects under normal circumstances. DROPS Guidance:Restricted Access Areas (Red Zones)

  33. Green Zones- anyone may enter as long as no additional barriers are in place. • Yellow Zones- only personnel with specific tasks in that zone may enter. All others require the Area Authority’s permission to enter or work in that zone. • Red Zones- personnel may be more exposed to falling objects, the movement of remotely operated equipment, high pressure, and/or other hazards as determined by risk assessment. Personnel in Red Zone must be required for the current operation and must be authorized by the Area Authority. • Area Authority must ensure an appropriate plan is in place for specific operations in a Red or Yellow Zone DROPS Guidance:Restricted Access Areas (Red Zones)

  34. Every effort should be made to identify and define an access route to the Area Authority’s common workplace location within the Green Zone to allow personnel access to Area Authority to request authorization into the Yellow and Red Zones. • Personnel not required for current operations must not be permitted into Yellow or Red Zones. • For any activities that require entry to a Red Zone, and for non-routine activities within a Yellow Zone, a documented risk assessment must be performed before permission is given. DROPS Guidance:Restricted Access Areas (Red Zones)

  35. Access to Red or Yellow Zones must be controlled at all times. • All access points should be identified and equipped with a physical barrier marking the point at which personnel cannot proceed without approval from the Area Authority. • The physical barrier may be a chain, gate, door etc. (Emergency egress must not be impeded.) • The barrier shall always be in place at all access points leading directly to Yellow and Red Zones, and at any other access points determined by the Area Authority. • The physical barrier should also include a sign (in both English and the predominant local language) that communicates the zone is a hazardous area and access requires the Area Authority’s authorization DROPS Guidance:Restricted Access Areas (Red Zones)

  36. Dropped object incidents dropped considerably when the UK HSE focused extensively on offshore safety • Key to use 2-pronged approach to promote DROPS (Enforcement & Self regulation) Enforcement & Industry Self Regulation