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A professional learning group; how to stimulate learners’ engagement in problem solving

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A professional learning group; how to stimulate learners’ engagement in problem solving Alia Sheety & Frida Rundell 531 Main Street, Bethlehem Pa. 18018 International Institute for Restorative Practices. International Institute for Restorative Practices A graduate School

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A professional learning group; how to stimulate learners’ engagement in problem solving

Alia Sheety & Frida Rundell

531 Main Street, Bethlehem Pa. 18018

International Institute for Restorative Practices

International Institute for Restorative Practices

A graduate School

Restoring Community in a Disconnected World

International Institute for Restorative Practices

A graduate School

Restoring Community in a Disconnected

What is a Professional Learning Group (PLG)

The Scaffolding Process in the PLG

Introduction

The PLG supports sharing knowledge, skills and experiences in a group setting (Rodger and Wachtel, 2000).

All members in a PLG team, including the facilitator, have equal status. This promotes a voice for all PLG members in a problem solving and brainstorming process.

Restorative Practices is the study of building social capital and achieving social discipline through participatory learning and decision-making. Through the use of restorative principles we bring active learning experiences into the classroom.

The social discipline window (Figure 1) is a simple but useful framework with broad application in many settings. It provides four different combinations that describe basic approaches to maintaining social norms and behavioral boundaries. The restorative domain combines both high expectation and high support and it is characterized by doing things with people.

Figure 1: Social Discipline

  • Expert knowledge is not always available. Hormel (2009) suggests that some teacher control over the process is needed.
  • During the introductory stage of the PLG process, teacher supports is needed. It is advisable that when introducing the PLG process to new students that a skilled facilitator be present.
  • 2. Some learners get side tracked. A community of learners might fail to confront the side-tracker. The facilitator’s input and experience is extremely helpful at this stage.

Students Preparation for the presentation at the PLG

  • Before the learning group meets:
  • Consider what issue you
  • want to share with the
  • PLG and what your
  • question is?
  • The Presentation Process
  • Be aware of:
  • Not responding during the feedback process
  • When selecting an action no justification or explanation is needed
  • keeping the professional learning group a safe place to present any idea.
  • A time Keeping
    • Time allocated for each stage
    • and to each learner
  • Creating a safe environment
    • No Judgments
    • No use of personal learners name
  • Follow up on each PLG session
    • Report back on action chosen

Restorative Pedagogy

Recent use of modern technology allows easier access to knowledge. This shifts teachers’ role from ownership of knowledge to a facilitator of process to enhance learning. Learners are no longer passive receivers but active and engaging participants (Freire, 1970; Vygotsky, 1980; & White, 2007). Thus the social context becomes critical for dynamic learning experiences (Bandura, 1978, Vygotsky, 1988)

Professional learning groups differ from professional learning communities.

Faculty/staff Administrators

Image 1: Professional Learning Community

Professional learning group (PLG) in higher education build communities of students who contribute to the learning process of each other. It utilizes social context and scaffolding skills to enhance the learning process in problem solving.

Students

Students Students

Image 2: Professional Learning Group

Limitations

Critical Components in Facilitating a PLG

Contact Information

WWW.IIRP.EDU

International Institute for Restorative Practices

A Graduate School

Alia Sheety, PHD Frida Rundell, PHD

aliasheety@iirp.edufridarundell@iirp.edu

Purpose

  • Our purposes for sharing PLG process are:
  • To expose and share with you (participants) a tool that you can add to your tool box and implement when appropriate;
  • To engage in reflective feedback about the process

I never teach my pupils; I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn.” ~ Albert Einstein