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Warm Water Fish Production as a Niche Market and Diversification Strategy . Why aquaculture?. Aquaculture in the UK remains a mainly coastal, specialised enterprise Not integrated with agriculture Specialised knowledge, sites (water sources), markets

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Presentation Transcript
why aquaculture
Why aquaculture?
  • Aquaculture in the UK remains a mainly coastal, specialised enterprise
    • Not integrated with agriculture
    • Specialised knowledge, sites (water sources), markets
    • Off-farm feeds-linked with marine ecosystems
why warm water fish why tilapia
Why warm-water fish? Why tilapia?
  • Lack of suitable local species with the right qualities
    • Tastes good
    • Feeds low in the food chain
    • Tolerant of culture
  • In many contexts tilapia are raised integrated within a broader, terrestrial farming system
warmwater
Warmwater…..
  • Maintaining culture systems at the right temperature (28oC)
  • Insulated, underutilised farm buildings
  • Low value thermal heat-potential for use locally
a rationale diversification approach
a rationale diversification approach?
  • Diversification a common aim
  • Many constraints:
    • No familiarity with technical and market issues
    • Level of capital required
  • Potential benefits
    • Can be based on locally available feedstock
    • Marketed as local and possibly ‘organic’
history and the future
History..and the future
  • Tilapia start-ups in the UK over last two decades have been capital intensive
  • Commodity orientation, specialised
  • Now, massive production in the Tropics will make commodity market very competitive
scale and function
Scale and function
  • Can tilapia production be simplified to produce relatively small amounts of high value fish to local and specialised markets?
  • And if so what technical and markets research is required?
  • What holistic benefits might result?
technical challenges
Technical challenges
  • Naturally tilapias graze on aquatic pastures-plankton, bacterial floc
  • Commercial systems tend to feed complete feeds-like broiler chickens
  • …but they require feed supplementary to natural feed to grow well
  • Ok in ponds but…..tanks?
clean water or food rich water
‘Clean’ water or ‘food-rich’ water?
  • Conventionally waste feed removed by a filter and fish raised in clean water
  • Can waste be retained in the system and used as a further source of feed?
  • Feeding the fish? Feeding the bacterial floc?
  • Results so far…..fish are growing (slower than conventional recirculation (filtered) systems….
waste or food
Waste …or food???

Naturalfood rich

Natural food poor

slide12
But….
  • Water quality remains high without expensive filter (25kg/m3 +)
  • Lower densities-appropriate,
    • lower risk approach
    • simple design and management of the system
  • Overall yield on 20% crude protein
  • Field beans and barley??
other benefits
Other benefits
  • Without fishmeal/oils and associated problems
  • Only useful effluents-local nutrient reuse
  • Traceability, low ‘fish miles’
  • Potentially organic
who will eat the fish
Who will eat the fish?
  • We have identified two major groups:
  • Ethnic markets
  • The ‘foodies’
  • Small quantities;
    • Specialist retailers
    • Farmers markets
    • Internet sales
    • Direct restuarant
ongoing research
Ongoing research
  • Trying to understand how to best manage the ‘floc’ system and produce fish profitably
  • Would this meet the needs of rural entrepreneurs? What types of farmers might be interested?
  • How could this system contribute to sustainable rural livelihoods?
the team
The team
  • University of Stirling:
  • Institute of Aquaculture
  • Department of Marketing
  • Public Health Group
    • Prof. Jimmy Young
    • Prof Andrew Watterson
    • Dr David Little
    • Dr Francis Murray
    • Kathleen Grady
    • Dr. Jimmy Turnbull: Institute of Aquaculture
    • Dr. Kim Jauncey: Institute of Aquaculture
    • Dr Ekram Azim: Researcher, Marie Curie Grant
    • Dr. Sarath Kodithuwakku: Entrepreneurship
    • Anton Immink: Communications officer
    • Marcus Thomson: Rural diversification
    • Dr. Sunil Kadri: Industry Liaison, Fish Welfare
  • Commercial Partners
    • Pisces Aquaculture Ltd
    • Freshwater Fish Farms Ltd
    • Nam Sai Farm