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Landscape Ecology EEES4760/6760 March 16, 2009 PowerPoint Presentation
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Landscape Ecology EEES4760/6760 March 16, 2009 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Landscape Ecology EEES4760/6760 March 16, 2009

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  1. Landscape Ecology EEES4760/6760 March 16, 2009 • Lessons learned from Term Paper I (all students) • Homework 2: edge influences • Final Term Paper: pattern-process • Edge and landscape management • Corridors

  2. Lessons learned from Term Paper I (all students) • Homework 2: edge influences: please visit the class webpage and download the assignment. It is due on April 10, 2009. • Final Term Paper: pattern-process: • Edge and landscape management • Corridors

  3. Lessons learned from Term Paper I (all students) • Homework 2: edge influences: please visit the class webpage and download the assignment. It is due on April 10, 2009. • Final Term Paper: pattern-process • Edge and landscape management • Corridors

  4. Final Term Paper Pattern-Process relations: Your final term paper will be on linkages between ecological processes and land mosaics. Emphases on landscape dynamics, ownership, disturbance, social/economic influences, or climate change are encouraged to be included in your paper. The instructor will NOT provide you with a list of the papers, instead you will have to find them through literature search. Each student will need to final his/her own relevant papers (no less than 5) and email them to Dr. Chen before April 3, 2009. These papers will be posted at the class webpage to share among the students. When you submit your papers, please also email the complete citation following the format of Ecological Applications so that we can compare our list with consistency. Dr. Chen will compile the list and post all the PDF files on our webpage. You will use the same instructions of Term Paper I, but with a maximum of 5 pages (excluding the references). The term paper is due on May 6, 2009. References: Ecological Applications, Conservation Biology, Ecology, Landscape Ecology, Biological Conservation, Ecosystems, Nature, Science, Journal of Ecology, Frontiers in Ecology and Environmental Science, Landscape and Urban Planning, Remote Sensing of Environment, Restoration Ecology,

  5. Lessons learned from Term Paper I (all students) • Homework 2: edge influences: please visit the class webpage and download the assignment. It is due on April 10, 2009. • Final Term Paper: pattern-process • Edge and landscape management • Corridors

  6. Research Need: Design sound experiments to test various hypotheses to form a united theory on edge effects. Questions?

  7. Hypothesized effects of edges on NEP within the AEI. Edge orientation and edge age will be the two most important factors determining the changes in NEP and/or WUE within the AEIs.

  8. Management Philosophies Leopold-Thomas-Harris/Yanher-Noss-… Create as much edge as possible because wildlife is a product of the places where two habitats meet. This has been the management principle for both public & private land owners until mid-90s. -- Aldo Leopold (1933) The essential requirements of wildlife- food, cover, and water- will be maintained so as to provide optimum ‘edge effect’ and interspersion of habitat components in important wildlife areas. -- BLM Manual 1603 (1973)

  9. The law of dispersion and interspersion work together to show the forest manager how to increase wildlife populations associated with edge. -- Thomas et al. (1979) But increasing emphasis on plant and nongame wildlife conservation during the last two decades has revealed many characteristics of edges and ecotones are now considered undesirable. -- Larry Harris (1988) We must not conclude that creation of more edge in landscapes will always have a positive effect on wildlife … -- Richard H. Yahner (1988)

  10. John Rademacher Methods: Study Site YO YR & MR

  11. Methods:Variables measured Forest structureComposition • DWD Seedling composition • Overstory tree density Function • Seedling density Litterc • Basal area AGTc • Canopy openness DWDc • LAI DWDc • LMA Fine rootc Coarse rootc

  12. YR MR YO MO Results: Forest Structure ~ DWDa and DWDv DWDa and DWDv for the four edge sides (YR,MR, YO and MO). ▲replicate 1, Δ replicate 2, and ● replicate 3 YR MR YO MO

  13. Lessons learned from Term Paper I (all students) • Homework 2: edge influences: please visit the class webpage and download the assignment. It is due on April 10, 2009. • Final Term Paper: pattern-process • Edge and landscape management • Corridors

  14. What are corridors? • Corridors are linear patches or narrow strips -- a special kind of patches. • Examples: roads, railroads, streams/rivers, power lines, sewer lines, trails, hedge rows/windbreaks, etc. • Structure • Width, Length, Height, Shape, Contrast, Connectivity, Spatial Configuration • Corridors are also dynamic (vs static) • Corridors can be visually classified by types: trough corridors, wooded strips, stream/river corridors, etc. • Function • Habitat • Conduit • Filter • Sink • Source Corridors Jiquan chases the bear

  15. The Great Wall in Northern China

  16. TUC use may occur on, above or below the corridor land surface. Both above-ground utilities (e.g., power lines) and underground utilities (e.g., pipelines) have been designated in alignments that provide for access maintenance, landscaping, etc. http://tuc.gov.ab.ca/

  17. Barrier orConduit?

  18. Access or Spread?

  19. Roads in Chequamegon National Forest, N. WI

  20. http://www.unl.edu/nac/windbreaks.html

  21. http://www.gcnursery.co.uk/windbreak.html

  22. http://www.justlogiclifescience.com.au/powerlines.html Power lines cause diseases through Static Electricity New science reveals, not radiation, but static electricity produced by power lines interferes with the bioelectrical life process causing diseases and premature aging.

  23. http://photos.innersource.com/page/45/31

  24. Cheatgrass was brought from Eurasia to Washington State in the 1890s. In 30 years it basically took over the Western USA http://www.enn.com/enn-news-archive/1999/08/081399/cheatgrass_5005.asp http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/aft/aft.html

  25. Cheatgrass changes not only the fire frequency of a site, but also the fire volatility, intensity and the extent that an area is likely to burn in the future. The combination of fires, and low nitrogen content soil may drive out the native plants. But the cheatgrass seems to thrive under these conditions. http://www.enn.com/enn-news-archive/1999/08/081399/cheatgrass_5005.asp

  26. Merriam & Saunders (1993)

  27. Hypotheses: Very rare/difficult in landscape ecology H1: Home range sizes of all three study species would be larger in patches with a corridor than in patches w/o a corridor. H2: Habitat generalists would more likely than habitat specialists to move between them. H3: Individual movement distances would be affected by corridor presence.

  28. Old field mouse: Perromyscus polionotus-- specialist Cotton rat: Sigmodon hispidus-- specialist Cotton Mouse: Peromyscus gossypinus -- generalist http://www.nsrl.ttu.edu/tmot1/sigmhisp.htm

  29. Specialists Generalist

  30. Hypotheses: results H1: Home range sizes of all three study species would be larger in patches with a corridor than in patches w/o a corridor.  not true H2: Habitat generalists would more likely than habitat specialists to move between them.  true H3: Individual movement distances would be affected by corridor presence.  not supported