museum entrance n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Museum Entrance PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Museum Entrance

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 16

Museum Entrance - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 120 Views
  • Uploaded on

Museum Entrance. Historical Museum of the Native Americans of North America. Visit the Curator Harry. Tribes. Land & Home. Food. Weapons. Essential Question. Welcome to the Lobby. Curator Information. Add Picture Here.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Museum Entrance' - dai


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
museum entrance

Museum Entrance

Historical Museum of the Native Americans of North America

Visit the Curator

Harry

Tribes

Land & Home

Food

Weapons

Essential

Question

Welcome to the Lobby

curator information
Curator Information

Add

Picture

Here

Hello. I am Professor Harrison. I am the curator here at the Historical Museum of the Native Americans of North America. I hope you enjoy the museum. In my free time, I like to hang out, and play the piano. Well, enjoy the museum…

Back to Lobby

Note: Virtual museums were first introduced by educators at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. This template was designed by Lindsey Warneka under the direction of Dr. Christy Keeler during a Teaching American History grant module. View the Educational Virtual Museums website for more information on this instructional technique.

tribes
Tribes

Montauk

Cherokee

Mohawk

Seneca

Back to Lobby

land homes
Land & Homes

Wigwams

Wigwams

Long House

Teepee

Back to Lobby

slide5
Food

Whales

Whales

Elk

Cornbread

Back to Lobby

slide6

Tomahawk

The word tomahawk derives from the Algonquian word tamahak meaning stone headed implements used mostly as tools or weapons. The tomahawk is a thick stick with a rock roped onto it at the tip. It was decorated with duck or chicken feathers. This, as a weapon, was thrown at people, to knock them out unconscious for just enough time for the thrower to knife the person in the heart.

Some tomahawks were carried around in pouches, or bags on horses because they were too heavy to carry around in one’s hands. It takes 2 weeks to make 1 tomahawk. They are made with a lot of handicraft and work. Very effective weapons.

Back to Lobby

essential question
Essential Question

Why do people migrate/immigrate?

People migrate/immigrate when they are scared or need other resources. Some natives ran to the south to get away from the Europeans . Others moved casually in need of other food or resources. Immigration/migration was part of the daily lifestyle for the nomadic tribes. Children of nomadic tribes never complained about having to walk the distance.

Back to Lobby

mohawk
Mohawk

Insert Artifact

Picture Here

The word Mohawk means ‘Man Eaters.’ They called themselves the Kanienkehaka meaning ‘People of the Flint.’After the Dutch settled in, they became allies with the Mohawk and a few other tribes. Women planted corn and other vegetables while men hunted during the fall and winter and fished during the summer. Each Mohawk community had a local board of leaders that guided the village chief or chiefs.

According to traditional accounts the Mohawk leader Hiawatha was the first one to agree to peace with the Europeans. There were three major clans. Turtle, Bear, and Wolf.

Back to Tribes

cherokee
Cherokee

Insert Artifact

Picture Here

The word Cherokee means ‘speakers of another language.’ They called themselves the Aniyunwiya meaning ‘the principal people.’ They were a very peaceful tribe. Although they were peaceful, they killed when they needed to. Men and women painted their faces with smashed rose pedals in a gooey liquid. They made clothing from animal fur, and jewelry out of rocks.

There were seven different clans. Wild Potato Clan, Long Haired Clan, Deer Clan, Bird Clan, Blue Holly Clan, Red Paint Clan, and the Wolf Clan.

Back to Tribes

seneca
Seneca

Insert Artifact

Picture Here

The name Seneca comes from the name of one of their villages, Osininka. They called themselves Onandawaga meaning ‘People of the mountain.’ Today, most of the Seneca speak English. Some of them, still speak their native language, but know all the words at least in the Children’s Dictionary.

For transport, the Seneca went in oak trees carved out to make canoes along the river. They used the tree bark to make shoes. Very basic shoes, not Converses. For transporting food and other goods, they used dogs.

Back to Tribes

long houses
Long Houses

Insert Artifact

Picture Here

Longhouses were built by native people in various parts of North America. They went up to 100 METERS! Usually only 5 to 7 meters wide. It was made of fire hardened poles, with a roof of leaves and grass. People slept on grass mats on either side of the Long House. They put fires in the middle of the houses at night, to keep them warm. Long Houses were kept in large quantity, not alone. Only tribes with large amounts of people used these.

Back to Homes

wigwams
Wigwams

Insert Artifact

Picture Here

Wigwams are Native American houses used by Algonquians in the woodland regions. Wigwam is the word for "house" in the Abenaki people, and Wetu is the word for "house" in the Wampanoag people. Wigwams are small houses, usually 8-10 feet tall. Wigwams are made of pieces of wood which are covered with mats and sheets of birch bark. The frame can be shaped like a cone, with a curved roof. Once the birch bark is in place, ropes or strips of wood are wrapped around the Wigwam to hold the bark in place.

Back to Houses

teepee
Teepee

Insert Artifact

Picture Here

Tepees (also Teepees or Tipis) are tent-like American Indian houses used by the tribes that lived in the plains. A tepee is made of a cone-shaped wood stem, and an outside of buffalo skin. Like modern tents, tepees are carefully made to build and destroy quickly. As a tribe moved from place to place, every family would bring their tipi poles and buffalo hide along with them. Originally, tepees were about 12 feet high, but once the tribes of the Plains got horses, they began making them twice as high.

These Teepees would get worn out, and the owner would go to someone else’s Teepee until they got a new one.

Back to Houses

cornbread
Cornbread

Insert Artifact

Picture Here

For those of you who think the Europeans brought Cornbread to the natives, you’re wrong. The natives were making Cornbread and using ground corn from way before the Europeans came. Cornbread was taken from the natives of the north to the south by fleeing native tribes. It was chosen to be made in the south, because of their wide supply of corn and other materials needed to make cornbread.

Cornbread is a delicious and easy thing to make. The natives could make it on the run, so you should make it at home!

Back to Food

slide15
Elk

Insert Artifact

Picture Here

The natives that lived further in from the coastline, would go hunting, and bring back some Elk on their horse. They ate Elk just as we eat chicken. Here is a picture of Elk stew:

Insert Artifact

Picture Here

Back to Food

whales
Whales

Insert Artifact

Picture Here

Hunting whales was no easy task. It was made all the more difficult by the complicated rituals that the Makah hunters would do in order to get ready for their hunts. Before to the hunt, Makah tribes and would take a bath in the icy waters of the Pacific. They would rub their skin raw on sharp mussels and barnacles. A few days before their hunt they would dig up a fresh grave and remove a skeleton. During the hunt the they would secure the chest of the skeleton on their backs, a gesture showing their respect for their dead catch of whales.

Back to Food