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Office of Basic Energy Sciences Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy. BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES -- Serving the Present, Shaping the Future. Basic Energy Sciences Update. Dr. Patricia M. Dehmer Director, Office of Basic Energy Sciences Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy

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BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES -- Serving the Present, Shaping the Future


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    1. Office of Basic Energy SciencesOffice of ScienceU.S. Department of Energy BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES -- Serving the Present, Shaping the Future Basic Energy Sciences Update Dr. Patricia M. Dehmer Director, Office of Basic Energy Sciences Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 5 August 2004 http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/

    2. News BES staffing chart – we have DDs! Budget update Hydrogen solicitation update BES “Program Plan” BES strategic planing and the role of BESAC(For BESAC discussion at this meeting)

    3. BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES -- Serving the Present, Shaping the Future V. BES strategic planning and the role of BESAC

    4. The Intersection of BESAC and BES – BES Strategic Planning • Mission challenges • Mission challenges updated in “Basic Research Needs for a Secure Energy Future” • Follow-on study “Basic Research Needs for the Hydrogen Economy” • Fundamental science challenges to address the mission • The ultrasmall: Science at the nanoscale • The ultrafast: Science at femtosecond and shorter timescales • Theory, modeling, and simulation: Science to understand, predict, and help us control our world • Complexity: Science of systems that exhibit emergent properties not anticipated from an understanding of the components • Enabling tools • Facilities that provide the fundamental probes of matter – photons, neutrons, and electrons • Nanoscale Science Research Centers • Stewardship of DOE-owned research institutions • Workforce development and the Nation’s universities

    5. N NanoSummit June 23-24, 2004

    6. Recent BES & BESAC Activities –Science that addresses the Mission ? BESAC BES BES

    7. Energy Flow Diagram for the U.S., 1999

    8. Rick’s Terawatt Challenge From Rick Smalley’s presentation at NanoSummit 14 Terawatts (world) 210 M BOE/day 30 – 60 Terawatts (world) 450 – 900 MBOE/day

    9. Nate’s Review of the Potentials of Various Renewables From Nate Lewis’s presentation at NanoSummit SolarPotential: 1.2x105 TWPractical: 600 TW Biomass 50% of all cultivatibleland: 7-10 TW Wind 4% Utilization: 2-3 TW Hydroelectric Gross: 4.6 TW Technically Feasible: 1.6 TW Economic: 0.9 TW Installed Capacity: 0.6 TW Geothermal Continental Total Potential: 11.6 TW

    10. Recent BES & BESAC Activities –Science that addresses the mission Solar BESAC BES BES • Solar Energy (Recommendations from BESAC study) • Increase the cost-competitive production of fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass by a hundred fold • Develop methods for solar energy conversion that result in a 10-50 fold decrease in the cost-to-efficiency ratio for the production of fuels and electricity • Convert solar energy into stored chemical fuels • Develop advanced materials for renewable energy applications

    11. Complex Systems Science for the st 21 Century Recent BES & BESAC Activities –Science that advances our understanding of the natural world Theory & Computing ? BESw/BESAC BES BESAC BESAC BESAC BESAC BESAC

    12. The Intersection of BESAC and BES – the BES Strategic Plan • Mission challenges • Mission challenges updated in “Basic Research Needs for a Secure Energy Future” • Follow-on study “Basic Research Needs for the Hydrogen Economy” • Fundamental science challenges to address the mission • The ultrasmall: Science at the nanoscale • The ultrafast: Science at femtosecond and shorter timescales • Theory, modeling, and simulation: Science to understand, predict, and help us control our world • Complexity: Science of systems that exhibit emergent properties not anticipated from an understanding of the components • Enabling tools • Facilities that provide the fundamental probes of matter – photons, neutrons, and electrons • Nanoscale Science Research Centers • Stewardship of DOE-owned research institutions • Workforce development and the Nation’s universities

    13. Complex Systems Science for the st 21 Century Recent BES & BESAC Activities –Science that advances our understanding of the natural world Theory & Computing ? BESw/BESAC BES BESAC BESAC BESAC BESAC BESAC • Grand Qs, e.g. in the style of Connecting Quarks to the Cosmos? • Beyond nano, or, alternatively, complex systems redux? • The forest, not the trees, in eV science.

    14. BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES -- Serving the Present, Shaping the Future I. The staff

    15. Fundamental Interactions Eric Rohlfing Robin Felder, Prog . Asst. Director's Office Staff Office of Basic Energy Sciences Office of Basic Energy Sciences Robert Astheimer F. Don Freeburn Patricia Dehmer, Director Fred Tathwell Margie Davis Mary Jo Martin, Administrative Specialist Karen Talamini Engineer, Vacant Materials Sciences and Materials Sciences and Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, Scientific User Facilities Division Engineering Division Engineering Division and Biosciences Division and Biosciences Division Harriet Kung, Director Harriet Kung, Director Walter Stevens, Director Walter Stevens, Director Pedro Montano, Director Christie Ashton, Program Analyst Christie Ashton, Program Analyst Diane Diane Marceau Marceau , Program Analyst , Program Analyst Linda Cerrone , Program Support Specialist Ann Lundy, Secretary Ann Lundy, Secretary Program Assistant (Vacant) Program Assistant (Vacant) Condensed Matter Phys X - ray & Neutron Materials and Fundamental Fundamental Energy Biosciences Energy Biosciences Molecular Processes Molecular Processes and Materials Chemistry Scattering Engineering Physics Interactions Interactions Research Research and Geosciences and Geosciences X - Ray & Neutron Scat. Facilities William Oosterhuis Robert Gottschall Eric Eric Rohlfing Rohlfing John Miller John Miller James Tavares James Tavares Vacant Melanie Becker, Prog . Asst. Terry Jones, Prog . Asst. Robin Felder, Robin Felder, Prog Prog . Asst. . Asst. Sharon Snead, Sharon Snead, Prog Prog . Asst. . Asst. Program Assistant (Vacant) Program Assistant (Vacant) Structure & Composition Atomic, Molecular, and Experimental Condensed Plant Sciences Spallation Neutron Catalysis and Chemical of Materials Optical Science Matter Physics Source (Construction) James Tavares Transformation Michael Casassa Raul Miranda Altaf ( Tof ) Carim James Horwitz David Ederer , ANL u Biochemistry and Jeffrey Hoy John Gordon, LANL u Biophysics Sharlene Weatherwax Nanoscale Science Mechanical Behavior of Theoretical Condensed Separations and Analysis Chemical Physics Research Centers Materials & Rad Effects Matter Physics Richard Hilderbrandt (Construction) Yok Chen William Millman Dale Koelling Frank Tully, SNL l Kristin Bennett Altaf ( Tof ) Carim Materials Chemistry & Physical Behavior Linac Coherent Light Photochemistry & Heavy Element Chemistry Biomolecular Materials of Materials Source (Construction) Radiation Research Lester Morss Dick Kelley Mary Gress Norman Edelstein, LBNL Vacant Jeffrey Hoy Aravinda Kini Synthesis & Processing X - ray & Neutron Computational and Chemical Energy and SNS, LCLS, and Science Scattering Theoretical Chemistry Chemical Engineering X - ray&Neutron Scattering Instrument MIEs Jane Zhu Paul Maupin Richard Hilderbrandt Helen Kerch Kristin Bennett Experimental Program to Geosciences Research Engineering Research Stimulate Competitive Nicholas Woodward Research (EPSCoR) IPA l Timothy Fitzsimmons David Lesmes , l Detailee u Matesh Varma George Washington U. Detailee , 1/4 time, not at HQ July 2004 Vacant

    16. BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES -- Serving the Present, Shaping the Future II. The budget

    17. FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2005 Congressional Appropriations (?) FY 2006 DOE Guidance for OMB Budget Preparation The DOE/SC Budget Cycle YOU ARE HERE! August 2004 BESAC Mtg. National Election, November 2, 2004 Inauguration, January 20, 2005

    18. U.S. Department of Energy The Office of Science FY 05 Budget Request Office of Science

    19. BES FY 2005 President’s Budget Request SBIR/STTR 20.3 CONSTRUCTION (Spallation Neutron Source, Nanoscale Science Research Centers, & Linac Coherent Light Source) 178.3 231.9 RESEARCH (Materials Sciences and Engineering Subprogram & Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Subprogram) Research Construction (Universities*) GPP 13.6 Capital Research Equipment 81.8 (Laboratories) 240.1 9.8 User Facilities AIP (Operating) FACILITY OPERATIONS (X-ray and Neutron Scattering Facilities & the Combustion Research Center) 287.7 B/A in millions of dollars * Includes the funding for not-for-profits, other $ 1,063.5 agencies, and private institutions.

    20. BES FY 2005 Budget – House and Senate Marks House Report 108-554The Committee recommendation for basic energy sciences is $1,076,530,000, an increase of $13,000,000 over the budget request. For purposes of reprogramming during fiscal year 2005, the Department may allocate funding among all operating accounts within Basic Energy Sciences. Research. — The Committee recommendation includes $612,228,000 for materials sciences and engineering, and $232,422,000 for chemical sciences, geosciences, and energy biosciences. The additional $13,000,000 in these accounts is to fund additional research on nanoscale science, including research on low cost nanoparticles using plasma reactors at the Idaho National Laboratory, and increase operating time on the Basic Energy Sciences user facilities. Also included within this account is $7,673,000 for the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), the same as the budget request. Construction. — The Committee recommendation includes $231,880,000 for Basic Energy Sciences construction projects, the same as the requested amount. Senate Report Not yet Conference Report Not yet

    21. 15-Year History of EWD Appropriations Bills

    22. FY 2007 planning starts in 8-9 months The DOE/SC Budget Cycle

    23. BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES -- Serving the Present, Shaping the Future III. Hydrogen solicitation update

    24. Approximately $21.5 million will be awarded in FY 2005, pending appropriations. Five high-priority research directions were the focus of the solicitation. They are: Novel Materials for Hydrogen Storage Membranes for Separation, Purification, and Ion Transport Design of Catalysts at the Nanoscale Solar Hydrogen Production Bio-Inspired Materials and Processes No applications will be accepted without a preapplication followed by a BES response encouraging a full application. Each FFRDC was limited to the submission of up to six preapplications as leading institution. For FFRDCs, BES reserves the right to encourage, in whole or in part, any, all, or none of the preapplications submitted, and BES may issue further guidance on the scope of full proposal submissions of those encouraged. Initial awards will be in Fiscal Year 2005. BES will coordinate with all appropriate groups, particularly EERE. BES Solicitation for Research inSupport of the President’s Hydrogen Fuel Initiative

    25. February 23, 2004 First discussion at BESAC May 15, 2004 Call for preapplications published July 15, 2004 Preapplications due September 1, 2004 Decisions on preapplications sent to PIs January 1, 2005 Full proposals due June – July 2005 Awards made Hydrogen Solicitation Timetable Important Dates

    26. BES FY05 Hydrogen Solicitation Preproposals Statistics A total of 665 qualified preapplications in five submission categories are under review by panels of Feds. A: Novel Materials for Hydrogen Storage B: Membranes for Separation, Purification, and Ion Transport C: Design of Catalysts at the Nanoscale D: Solar Hydrogen Production E: Bio-Inspired Materials and Processes E: Bio- Inspired (54) D: Solar (86) A: Storage (199) C: Catalysts (152) B: Membranes (174)

    27. BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES -- Serving the Present, Shaping the Future IV. BES Program Plan

    28. BES Spring 2004 Program Plan DOE Strategic Plan General Goal: General Goal 5, World Class Scientific Research Capacity: Provide world-class scientific research capacity needed to: ensure the success of Department missions in national and energy security; advance the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computational sciences, or provide world-class research facilities for the Nation’s science enterprise. BES Mission Statement and Program Goal: Mission: The mission of the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program – a multipurpose, scientific research effort – is to foster and support fundamental research to expand the scientific foundations for new and improved energy technologies and for understanding and mitigating the environmental impacts of energy use. The portfolio supports work in the natural sciences, emphasizing fundamental research in materials sciences, chemistry, geosciences, and aspects of biosciences. Program Goal 5.22.00.00: Advance the basic science for energy independence – Provide the scientific knowledge and tools to achieve energy independence, securing U.S. leadership and essential breakthroughs in basic energy sciences. Objectives: Core Disciplines: Advance the core disciplines of the basic energy sciences, producing transformational breakthroughs in materials sciences, chemistry, geosciences, energy biosciences, and engineering research. Nanoscale Science: Lead the nanoscale science revolution, delivering the foundations and discoveries for a future built around controlled chemical processes and materials designed one atom at a time or through self-assembly. Additional details of our program objectives are contained in the Office of Science Strategic Plan (February 2004), the Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty Year Outlook (November 2003), as well as the most recent Office of Science budget.

    29. OMB Program Assessment Rating Tool Performance MeasuresCOVs to address these long-term measures • By 2015, demonstrate progress in designing, modeling, fabricating, characterizing, analyzing, assembling, and using a variety of new materials and structures, including metals, alloys, ceramics, polymers, biomaterials and more – particularly at the nanoscale – for energy-related applications. Definition of “Success” – BES-supported research leads to important discoveries that impact the course of others’ research; new knowledge and techniques, both expected and unexpected, within and across traditional disciplinary boundaries; and high-potential links across these boundaries. Definition of “Minimally Effective” – BES-supported research leads to a steady stream of outputs of good quality. • By 2015, demonstrate progress in understanding, modeling, and controlling chemical reactivity and energy transfer processes in the gas phase, in solutions, at interfaces, and on surfaces for energy-related applications, employing lessons from inorganic, organic, self-assembling, and biological systems. Definition of “Success” - BES-supported research leads to important discoveries that impact the course of others’ research; new knowledge and techniques, both expected and unexpected, within and across traditional disciplinary boundaries; and high-potential links across these boundaries. Definition of “Minimally Effective” - BES-supported research leads to a steady stream of outputs of good quality.

    30. OMB Program Assessment Rating Tool Performance MeasuresCOVs to address these long-term measures • By 2015, develop new concepts and improving existing methods for solar energy conversion and other major energy research needs identified in the 2003 Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee workshop report, Basic Research Needs to Assure a Secure Energy Future. Definition of “Success” - BES-supported research leads to important discoveries that are rapidly and readily available and feed, as appropriate, into use or projected use by the Department’s technology offices, by other federal agencies, and/or by the private sector. There is evidence of substantive interactions with the Department’s technology offices in most BES program areas. Definition of “Minimally effective” - BES-supported research leads to a steady stream of outputs of good quality that show the potential to impact energy research. • By 2015, demonstrate progress in conceiving, designing, fabricating, and using new instruments to characterize and ultimately control materials. Definition of “Success” - BES-supported research leads to new concepts and designs for next-generation instruments and detectors for x-ray, neutron, and electron-beam scattering and for research using electric and/or magnetic fields. Definition of “Minimally effective” - BES-supported research leads to new instruments that are world class. How will progress be measured? - Expert Review every three years will rate progress as “Excellent”, “Minimally Effective” or “Insufficient”.