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University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point Bethany King Kelly Barden b king174@uwsp.edu kbard020@uwsp.edu Presented on December 19, 2006. Neuro-Semantics “If you can speak fluently in one context, you can learn to speak fluently in all contexts.”. What is Neuro-Semantics?.

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University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point

Bethany King Kelly Barden

bking174@uwsp.edukbard020@uwsp.edu

Presented on December 19, 2006

Neuro-Semantics“If you can speak fluently in one context, you can learn to speak fluently in all contexts.”

what is neuro semantics
What is Neuro-Semantics?
  • Neuro-semantics is a model that describes how we make meaningthrough classifying, associating, and evaluating what we experience – the meanings we make determine the actions we take
  • Neuro-semantics was created in 1997 by Michael Hall and Bobby Bodenhamer.
  • Neuro-semantics is about pooling together one’s cognitive resources to realize his or her self-worth
  • Neuro-semantics is a meta-discipline approach, meaning it is about being aware of your potentials
overview
Overview
  • Though Neuro-Semantics is not effective for everyone who stutters, it has proven to benefit many people who stutter
  • The Neuro-Semantics approach is not a “cure-all” for stuttering – those who are successful must work hard to obtain fluency
principles of neuro semantics
Principles of Neuro-Semantics
  • Cognition explains why most people who stutter can speak fluently in some contexts but not in others
  • Negative views toward one’s self increase stuttering behaviors
  • Once a strong sense of self-worth has been developed, the person who stutters gains control of his or her speech
  • Gaining self-worth empowers the individual to not care what others think of them because of their disfluencies
how neuro semantics relates to disfluency
How Neuro-Semantics relates to Disfluency
  • For disfluency to be viewed in a negative way, it is given unwanted labels such as: “bad, flawed, or wrong”
  • Negative views are learned in childhood and are carried over into adulthood
  • These negative views later determine our concept of “self”
  • These views develop into an external locus of control, determining whether you have the power or resources to control your speech
  • Specific events and environments may trigger disfluency because of associations made with past negative encounters
the 7 matrices of neuro semantics for fluency
The 7 Matrices of Neuro-Semantics for Fluency

Our sense of:

I. Self

II. Power/Resourcefulness, Self-Efficacy

III. Others’ relationships

IV. World

V. Time

VI. Meaning/Value

VII. Purpose/Intent

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Learned Patterns and Frames of MindBodenhamer, Bobby G. (2006). What We Believe About Blocking And Stuttering. Retrieved December 11, 2006 from www.masteringstuttering.com.

thinking about thinking
Thinking about Thinking
  • We continually think about what we are thinking
  • This is how we create self-images
  • Negative and positive thoughts are processed in the same way
  • Thoughts override previous thoughts (second thoughts change first thoughts)
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Cognitive Treatment “Perceptual Positions”Borasky, M. (2005). New Hope for People Who Stutter. Retrieved December 11, 2006 from http://www.contentmart.com/ContentMart/content.asp?LinkID=29528&CatID=327&content=1.

  • First Position – seeing the world from your own point of view; “How does this conversation affect me?”
  • Second Position – feeling empathy for others and taking their perspective; think about how they view how you are communicating
  • Third Position – dissociating yourself from the entire conversation; being able to appreciate both perspectives
perceptual positions continued
“Perceptual Positions” (continued)
  • Fourth Position – allows us to understand all of the surrounding contexts (cultural, linguistic, business, family, etc.) in our world
  • Fifth Position – highest level of perspective; taking on a universal and spiritual view point
  • The ability for a person to freely move from one position to another is key to controlling stuttering.
pros and cons
Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Helps the individual develop a positive self-image
  • The individual gains control over his/her speech by developing an internal locus of control
  • Skills generalize to everyday life because Neuro-semantics address life-changing behaviors and thought processes

Cons

  • Lacks research
  • No guidelines on implementing this approach into therapy
  • No clear description of how change is measured
references
References
  • Bodenhamer, Bobby G. (2006). What We Believe About Blocking And Stuttering. Retrieved December 11, 2006 from www.masteringstuttering.com.
  • Bodenhamer, Bobby G. (2005). Mastering Blocking & Stuttering with Neuro-Semantics. Retrieved December 11, 2006 from www.masteringstuttering.com.
  • Borasky, M. (2005). New Hope for People Who Stutter. Retrieved December 11, 2006 from http://www.contentmart.com/ContentMart/content.asp?LinkID=29528&CatID=327&content=1.