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Supporting Teachers Within RTI: The Role of the School Psychologist. Jon Potter Lisa Bates OrRTI Project. OSPA/WSASP Conference Fall 2010. Objectives. Develop awareness about the potential role of the school psychologist in a RTI model within the domains of: Assessment/Evaluation

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Supporting Teachers Within RTI: The Role of the School Psychologist


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    1. Supporting Teachers Within RTI: The Role of the School Psychologist Jon Potter Lisa Bates OrRTI Project OSPA/WSASP Conference Fall 2010

    2. Objectives • Develop awareness about the potential role of the school psychologist in a RTI model within the domains of: • Assessment/Evaluation • Consultation

    3. Core Principles of RTI • All children can be taught effectively • Focus on prevention and early intervention • Provide services using a tiered model • Use a problem-solving method to make decisions • Use research-based interventions • Monitor student progress to inform instruction • Use data to make decisions • Use assessment for different purposes: • Screening • Skill diagnostics • Progress monitoring NASDSE, 2006

    4. Essential Components of an RTI Model • High quality instruction and intervention materials • System for collecting data • Data-based decision making using a problem-solving method NASDSE, 2006

    5. The Role of School Psychologists • Assessment/Evaluation • Consultation/Coaching

    6. How much time do you send on these activities currently? • Assessment/Evaluation? • Consultation/Coaching?

    7. Assessment/Evaluation

    8. What to Assess ICEL • Instruction:How content is taught • Curriculum:What content is taught • Environment:Accommodations, modifications, & other environmental considerations • Learner:Things specific to the student

    9. ICEL

    10. How to Assess RIOT • Review:existing information • Interview:parents, teachers, student • Observe:student during instruction • Test:student skills LEAST TO MOST INTRUSIVE DIRECT TO INDIRECT

    11. Multiple Sources and Domains Goal: Convergent Data from Multiple Sources Why a student is struggling Curriculum Instruction RIOT RIOT Learner RIOT Environment RIOT

    12. The Role of School Psychologists: Assessment • Assisting in the collection and analysis of academic screening, progress, and diagnostic data • Ensuring high quality instruction and intervention programs by assessing instructional contexts • Conducting Functional Behavior Assessments (FBA) and developing Behavior Intervention Plans (BIP) R C E L I O I T

    13. Assisting in the collection and analysis of academic screening and progress data • Screening – Given to all students regularly to determine who receives extra support • Progress Monitoring – Given to those students who are receiving extra support • Diagnostic – Given to a smaller number of students for whom more information is needed to create an intervention matched to the student’s needs

    14. Additional Diagnostic Data • The major purpose for administering diagnostic tests is to provide information that is useful in planning more effective instruction. • Diagnostic tests should only be given when there is a clear expectation that they will providenew information about a child’s difficulties learning to read that can be used to provide more focused, or more powerful instruction.

    15. Diagnostic Assessment Questions “Why is the student not performing at the expected level?” (Defining the Problem) “What is the student’s instructional need?” (Designing an Intervention)

    16. Assessing Enabling Skills Ex. Phonemic Awareness Vital for Diagnostic Process! Hard • Phoneme deletion and manipulation • Blending and segmenting individual phonemes • Onset-rime blending and segmentation • Syllable segmentation and blending • Sentence segmentation • Rhyming • Word comparison IF DIFFICULTY DETECTED HERE.. THEN check here! Easy

    17. Diagnostic Assessments • Quick Phonics Screener (Jan Hasbrouck) • Digging Deeper (Wendy Robinson) • CORE Multiple Measures • Error Analysis • Curriculum-Based Evaluation Procedures (Ken Howell)

    18. Digging Deeper Questions http://www.aea11.k12.ia.us/educators/idm/Day5_10/Digging_Questions_k8.pdf

    19. Core Multiple Measures

    20. Error Analysis • Select a 250 word passage on which you estimate that the student will be 80-85% accurate. • Record the student’s errors on your copy of the reading probe. • Use at least 25 errors for students in grade 1 to conduct an error analysis and at least 50 errors for students in second grade and above. • Use an error analysis sheet to conduct error analysis.

    21. Error Analysis

    22. Assisting in the collection and analysis of academic progress data • Assessment activities before referral is made to remediate a problem (screening, progress monitoring, diagnostic data) • Linked to comprehensive evaluation • Student has a disability (screening & progress monitoring data) • Impacts their education (screening & progress monitoring data) • Needs specially designed instruction • Linked to IEP development • Develop goals (screening, diagnostic, and progress monitoring data) • Monitor progress on goals (screening, diagnostic, and progress monitoring data)

    23. Assisting in the collection and analysis of academic progress data • Makes your job easier!!!!!!

    24. How do these assessment activities (screening, progress monitoring, & diagnostic assessment) compare to what you are currently doing in the area of assessment?

    25. The Role of School Psychologists: Assessment • Assisting in the collection and analysis of academic screening, progress, and diagnostic data • Ensuring high quality instruction and intervention programs by assessing instructional contexts • Conducting Functional Behavior Assessments (FBA) and developing Behavior Intervention Plans (BIP) R C E L I O I T

    26. 2. Ensuring high quality instruction and intervention programs by assessing instructional contexts • Observing the critical components of effective teaching • Focus on teacher behaviors shown to improve student outcomes RIOT ICEL Instruction Observing Brophy & Good, 1986; Gunter, Hummell, & Conroy, 1998

    27. Instructional Delivery Features to Examine • Instructor provides multiple opportunities for students to practice instructional tasks • Students are successful completing activities at a high criterion level of performance • Students are engaged in lesson during teacher led-instruction

    28. Multiple Opportunities to Practice • Provides more than one opportunity to practice each new skill • Provides opportunities for practice after each step in instruction • Elicits group responses when feasible • Provides extra practice based on accuracy of student responses

    29. Assess opportunities to respond • What is an Opportunity to Respond? • Need to operationally define, for example: “An instructional question, statement or gesture made by the teacher that seeks an academic response (i.e. “What sound,” “Sound it out,”, “point to the /a/ sound”, etc.) OTR’s caninclude behavior related statements or directives as long as they have an academic component (i.e. “write the answer in your workbook”).” • Be clear!

    30. Instructional Delivery Features to Examine • Instructor provides multiple opportunities for students to practice instructional tasks • Students are successful completing activities at a high criterion level of performance • Students are engaged in lesson during teacher led-instruction

    31. Students are successful completing activities at a high criterion level of performance • The group of students demonstrate a high percentage of accurate responses • Individual students demonstrate a high percentage of accurate responses • Holds same standard of accuracy for high performers and low performers

    32. First Time Correct = How many errors are students making the first time they answer the new tasks? Students Are Successful • Levels of Mastery: • 90% First time correct on new material • 95% Subsequent responding (after first time)

    33. Correct Academic Responding (CAR):90% 1st Time Responding; 95% Subsequent Responding • Successful Student Engagement • Ensures that students are not practicing errors • Practice to automaticity/mastery • Provides practice at a high level of success to build accuracy and fluency • How do you measure CAR???? CAR = # of correct student respond # of opportunities to respond Brophy & Good, 1986, Lyon, 1998 Adapted from Martin & Tobin, 2006

    34. 6 11= 55%

    35. Students are successful completing activities at a high criterion level of performance • The group of students demonstrate a high percentage of accurate responses • Individual students demonstrate a high percentage of accurate responses • Holds same standard of accuracy for high performers and low performers

    36. Students Are Successful • Coding Student Responses: + = correct response 0 = incorrect response M = teacher model T = teacher test

    37. Individual students have a high degree of success First Time correct= # of correct first responses total # of first responses 4 6 = 66%

    38. Error Correction:Should occur after ALL errors • Prevent students from learning misrules • Positively correlated with • Student Achievement • Ratings of Teacher Effectiveness Adapted from Martin & Tobin, 2006

    39. Error Correction • Does the teacher correct errors? • Does the teacher provide opportunities for the students to respond again to that item?

    40. Students are successful completing activities at a high criterion level of performance • The group of students demonstrate a high percentage of accurate responses • Individual students demonstrate a high percentage of accurate responses • Holds same standard of accuracy for high performers and low performers

    41. Holds same standard of accuracy for high performers and low performers • Teachers hold the same expectations for low achievers and high achievers • No excuses!!!!

    42. Instructional Delivery Features to Examine • Instructor provides multiple opportunities for students to practice instructional tasks • Students are successful completing activities at a high criterion level of performance • Students are engaged in lesson during teacher led-instruction

    43. Students are engaged in lesson during teacher led-instruction • Teacher gains student attention before initiating instruction • Paces lesson to maintain attention • Maintains close proximity to students • Transitions quickly between tasks • Intervenes with off-task students to maintain their focus

    44. Instructional Pacing:8-12 Opportunities to Respond per Minute • Opportunity to learn • Provides mass trial practice to build fluency and achieve mastery • Provides opportunity to monitor student performance • Positively correlated with: • Student On-Task Behavior • Student Academic Achievement • Pacing = # of opportunities to respond • # of minutes observed Adapted from Martin & Tobin, 2006

    45. 11/10= 1.1 opportunities to respond per minute

    46. Tools for Measuring Effective Teaching: Data Pacing # of opportunities to respond8-12 OTRs per minute# of minutes observedfor most intensive instruction Student Accuracy # of correct responses 90% or above # of opportunities to respond

    47. How does this compare to your current practices in the area of instructional observation/assessment?